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Affordable Skis

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Alright, im looking for ideas for a nice reliable set of skis,bindings, and boots, that won't have me paying a ton. i want to have fun skiing but im not ready to drop a couple hundred of dollars

ANY IDEAS

THANKS

post #2 of 28
Buy straight skis or used demo gear on Ebay.
post #3 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by King4227 View Post

Alright, im looking for ideas for a nice reliable set of skis,bindings, and boots, that won't have me paying a ton. i want to have fun skiing but im not ready to drop a couple hundred of dollars

ANY IDEAS

THANKS


I'm sorry to break it to you but unless you are buying equipment that is way out of date your not going to be able to get skis, bindings and boots with dropping at least $400 or $500 and thats if you can get some really good deals. I don't know where you live but you might be able to get a pair of skis and bindings from a rental store but then again they are selling that stuff for a reason its, out dated and reaching the end of its life.

Boots are a whole other story. You probably will be able to find some really cheap ones but they will probably be used and as almost everyone here will tell you, you really don't want to go anywhere near used boots unless you really enjoy putting your feet into uncomfortable things. 
post #4 of 28
I purchased my first set of skis, bindings and boots yesterday from my local Scheels sporting goods store.  I'm at the very least a beginner, but wanted a decent set-up.  I got Salomon X wing 4 skis, Salomon Performa MG Alpine Ski boots, and Salomon 610 bindings--all for under $400.  It was a HUGE sale though.

The salesman said the skis/bindings retail for close to $399, and the boots close to $149.  Skis w/bindings were on sale for $289.97 + an extra 33% off, and the boots were on sale for $139.  Then he game me an additional 10% off for it being a package deal with everything ringing in at $357......not bad IMO for a beginners set of skis and boots.  But then again, I'm just a beginner! lol

Check them out online.  They might offer the same sale prices through their websites.
post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkirke View Post

I purchased my first set of skis, bindings and boots yesterday from my local Scheels sporting goods store.  I'm at the very least a beginner, but wanted a decent set-up.  I got Salomon X wing 4 skis, Salomon Performa MG Alpine Ski boots, and Salomon 610 bindings--all for under $400.  It was a HUGE sale though.

The salesman said the skis/bindings retail for close to $399, and the boots close to $149.  Skis w/bindings were on sale for $289.97 + an extra 33% off, and the boots were on sale for $139.  Then he game me an additional 10% off for it being a package deal with everything ringing in at $357......not bad IMO for a beginners set of skis and boots.  But then again, I'm just a beginner! lol

Check them out online.  They might offer the same sale prices through their websites.

unfortuanetly the OP said he didn't want to spend several hundred dollars and although that was a great deal $357 is still several hundred dollars
post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkirke View Post

I purchased my first set of skis, bindings and boots yesterday from my local Scheels sporting goods store.  I'm at the very least a beginner, but wanted a decent set-up.  I got Salomon X wing 4 skis, Salomon Performa MG Alpine Ski boots, and Salomon 610 bindings--all for under $400.  It was a HUGE sale though.

The salesman said the skis/bindings retail for close to $399, and the boots close to $149.  Skis w/bindings were on sale for $289.97 + an extra 33% off, and the boots were on sale for $139.  Then he game me an additional 10% off for it being a package deal with everything ringing in at $357......not bad IMO for a beginners set of skis and boots.  But then again, I'm just a beginner! lol

Check them out online.  They might offer the same sale prices through their websites.
Please realize I am not trying to be a dick but, those boots are nowhere near decent unless your foot resembles a horses hoof. Plus I am sure the guy helping you did not know the first thing about how to properly fit a boot. If I sound harsh it is because I see this almost everyday. Person goes into a big sporting goods store, buys a boot that ends up bring too big and they either suffer with it or give up the sport. Boots are THE #1 most important piece of gear you will buy. If a person is on a budget, I tell them to get a good set of boots, from a compitent bootfiiter and rent skis the first year. You will end up in a much better position down the road
post #7 of 28
I dont agree that he will have to spend $400 -$500 for decent equipment.  I think he is going to be out of luck not spending $200.  Last year I bought some Monster IM's brand new for $184 shipped, and some dalbelo mx ski boots for $69.   The dalbello's were so fricking nice.
There is no fricking way we can help you without you giving us more info.  How tall are you?  What size are your feet?  Are your feet wide or narrow?  If you wear a size 8-14 mens ski boot, Try some dalbello's out at the local ski resort rental.  Here are some dalbello mx for $69
http://galacticsnowsports.com/used-dalbello-mx-super-ski-boots.html
at the same site you can find used k2 4r with marker bindings for $60
Rossignol
Model: FreeRide FRX for $90, plus alot of other good deals at galacticsnowsports.com
Another good site is level 9
Here are some xenon 2's without bindings for $90  http://www.levelninesports.com/head-xenon-railflex-lite-skis-170cm-p-6046.html

But these are different sizes and you didnt even give us your height so there is no way we can help you!!  Actually I think bang for the buck my suggestion of level 9 and galacticsnowsports has a ton of good deals.  But you want to get decent skis, boots, binding and dont want to spend $200??  You are dreaming, IMO
post #8 of 28
I totally agree with this post.  I got a very decent boot at a good price, but their is no way I would of if I didnt rent the same boots at a ski resort and make sure they worked aout well.  I do think the Dalbello's at the site I mentioned are a very good deal, IF AND ONLY IF YOU GO TO A SKI RESORT THAT HAS THESE BOOTS (the mx turned into a current boot, forget what it is, and you may have to try a couple of ski resorts to find it) and rent them.
Being a beginner, I think you can find some decent skis with binding for ~$50, and it will save you money.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JDoyal View Post



Please realize I am not trying to be a dick but, those boots are nowhere near decent unless your foot resembles a horses hoof. Plus I am sure the guy helping you did not know the first thing about how to properly fit a boot. If I sound harsh it is because I see this almost everyday. Person goes into a big sporting goods store, buys a boot that ends up bring too big and they either suffer with it or give up the sport. Boots are THE #1 most important piece of gear you will buy. If a person is on a budget, I tell them to get a good set of boots, from a compitent bootfiiter and rent skis the first year. You will end up in a much better position down the road
 
post #9 of 28
I totally disagree.  I had crap boots, a pair of rear entry's and a regular pair that didnt fit very well, and found a good deal for $70.  Of course I tried out the same boot at the ski resort and got fitted, but they were soooo nice.  And ski's from a couple of years ago VERY WELL may be the exact same ski as the current model, just with different graphics.   He is just a beginner, he can easily get GOOD ski's that he can grow into with decent bindings for $50 - $200.  And the $200 figure was for me, who skis the double diamond, and finding a good ski for someone who skis the diamonds is alot tougher than finding a ski for a beginner.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post




I'm sorry to break it to you but unless you are buying equipment that is way out of date your not going to be able to get skis, bindings and boots with dropping at least $400 or $500 and thats if you can get some really good deals. I don't know where you live but you might be able to get a pair of skis and bindings from a rental store but then again they are selling that stuff for a reason its, out dated and reaching the end of its life.

Boots are a whole other story. You probably will be able to find some really cheap ones but they will probably be used and as almost everyone here will tell you, you really don't want to go anywhere near used boots unless you really enjoy putting your feet into uncomfortable things. 
post #10 of 28
 I didn't say impossible just not likely. I just got a pair of skis/bindings that I really enjoy but the deal was through a friend who had them in their garage and didn't want them anymore.The op also said he wasn't looking to spend hundreds of dollars which I interrupted to mean he wanted sub $200 or $300 which for boots/poles/skis/bindings will be hard to hit.
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDoyal View Post

Please realize I am not trying to be a dick but...

Your not, someone must speak the truth.

Complete setup under $200, never happen.

Big box 2 year clearance price:

Boots (crappy & too big) = $175
Skis = $150
Binding (youth) = $55
Poles (cause your not stealing mine) = $25
Optional gaper goggle = $35
Guy that has no idea what he's doing (nor care) putting it all together = Priceless - BTW, you do have to pay for that too.

Advice:

Don't listen to Internet morons buying $70 boots, find someone at home that actually knows what they're doing to help you. He/she will find you gear on the cheap and it will be better than this crap.

<$200 no way.
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by King4227 View Post

Alright, im looking for ideas for a nice reliable set of skis,bindings, and boots, that won't have me paying a ton. i want to have fun skiing but im not ready to drop a couple hundred of dollars

ANY IDEAS

THANKS



A whole set up for < $200?


You wouldn't be from Detroit by any chance?

post #13 of 28
In college, I was able to score a set of skied 2x Dolomite Sintesi 8.5 boots (a high level boot) for $60 off of Ebay.  And, I picked up a pair of great condition Volkl P40's for something like $199 with binding, so it can be done.  Very important disclaimer: I had done my research, and knew that these skis would work for me, and that the boots fit. If you get the wrong gear or a boot that is the wrong size (more than likely if you are purchasing something through ebay without knowing much about fitting boots), or skis that are too stiff/too soft/too long, you are throwing your money away. 

I had a guy come into the shop over Thanksgiving: he was a fairly tall intermediate, and "won" a raffle to buy a pair of Fischer Cool Heats in 180cm for $299 (they sell on Ebay for $299 all the time). The Cool Heat is a lot of ski, really a slightly wider Progressor 9+, suited to very good and fast skiers.   When I mounted them for him, he noted that "this ski seems awfully stiff". After skiing it the next day, he was thinking aloud when he came back in: "well, I am going to have to deal with these for a couple of seasons until I can get skis that are more suited to me". The sad thing was that we had a pair of Elan Magfire 78's, last year's ski with binding in 176cm, that would have been just what he was looking for.  Price: $299.  He just figured that he was getting a good deal because he won a raffle (or scam for an unsuspecting ski buyer).  My point: don't shop on price unless you know what you are doing.  Throwing away money on gear that is unsuited to you gets expensive.  And, it is nearly impossible to get good gear from a reputable seller for $200.  Not unlike walking into Saks and asking for an Armani suit on a $399 budget.
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post


I had a guy come into the shop over Thanksgiving: he was a fairly tall intermediate, and "won" a raffle to buy a pair of Fischer Cool Heats in 180cm for $299 (they sell on Ebay for $299 all the time). The Cool Heat is a lot of ski, really a slightly wider Progressor 9+, suited to very good and fast skiers.   When I mounted them for him, he noted that "this ski seems awfully stiff". After skiing it the next day, he was thinking aloud when he came back in: "well, I am going to have to deal with these for a couple of seasons until I can get skis that are more suited to me". The sad thing was that we had a pair of Elan Magfire 78's, last year's ski with binding in 176cm, that would have been just what he was looking for.  Price: $299.  He just figured that he was getting a good deal because he won a raffle (or scam for an unsuspecting ski buyer).  My point: don't shop on price unless you know what you are doing.  Throwing away money on gear that is unsuited to you gets expensive.  And, it is nearly impossible to get good gear from a reputable seller for $200.  Not unlike walking into Saks and asking for an Armani suit on a $399 budget.
 
Hey Dawg, why dont you tell me what I have done wrong (I am asking so don't worry about hurting my feelings, plus I know you will be respectful).

Last year I needed some boots.  Paying $350 for new boots was just not an option.  I saw dalbello MX's for $70.  I have a friend at the local mount ski rental, and he let me try out some dalbello mx (rent) for free.  He fit the boots, got the correct boot for me, and it was great.  My skiing was so much better.  So I bought the boot in the appropriate mondo that we figured out at the shop and the boots felt great and really improved my skiing.

This year, found some last years elan 888 for $225 including bindings.  Haven't tried them yet but figure they should sky the local expert bowl that get a foot or two of pow pow.
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveys View Post


Last year I needed some boots.  Paying $350 for new boots was just not an option.  I saw dalbello MX's for $70.  I have a friend at the local mount ski rental, and he let me try out some dalbello mx (rent) for free.  He fit the boots, got the correct boot for me, and it was great.  My skiing was so much better.  So I bought the boot in the appropriate mondo that we figured out at the shop and the boots felt great and really improved my skiing.
 

Well the key here is that you found the proper fit for the boot BEFORE you bought it. As Dawg said there is nothing wrong with getting bargain prices if you are informed on what will work. I am also assuming that you knew what you were buying when you bought the skis.

Now we understand that it can be done. We are trying to warn the guy against  just going on ebay and being like "oh those boots are close to my size and they are cheap!" Because that's just throwing money because more than likely they are going to be a terrible fit and the same goes for the skis.

Could you please stop trying to be counter productive and prove us wrong, because the truth is I wish we could all find everything we need for under a $100 but thats not going to happen. I would rather the guy take a little longer in obtaining the equipment and get stuff that will be enjoyable, over him getting stuff he'll use 3 times and than say this sucks and it all go into a dark closet. The $100 he saved doesn't really matter when the $200 he spent sits in a closet because he was so miserable using ill fitting equipment  
post #16 of 28
i would check out levelninesports.com, they have some good stuff, i agree though, spend some money, it will be worth it in the end....
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveys View Post



Hey Dawg, why dont you tell me what I have done wrong (I am asking so don't worry about hurting my feelings, plus I know you will be respectful).

Last year I needed some boots.  Paying $350 for new boots was just not an option.  I saw dalbello MX's for $70.  I have a friend at the local mount ski rental, and he let me try out some dalbello mx (rent) for free.  He fit the boots, got the correct boot for me, and it was great.  My skiing was so much better.  So I bought the boot in the appropriate mondo that we figured out at the shop and the boots felt great and really improved my skiing.

This year, found some last years elan 888 for $225 including bindings.  Haven't tried them yet but figure they should sky the local expert bowl that get a foot or two of pow pow.
 
Doesn't sound like you did anything wrong; you did your homework, which is just what I was suggesting has to be done if you are intending to get gear on the cheap (see my example of buying the P40's and Dolomite boots when I was in college). I could go on Ebay right now and pick up a sweet pair of skis and boots that would work perfectly for me, for under $350, precisely because I work in the industry and know my needs.  For "money down the toilet", I am referring to the person who "gets a good deal" but has not done their homework, and their "deal" ends up costing them more in the end, as the gear they end up with is just not compatible with their needs.  It is that person who needs the expert to get them the right gear, especially when it comes to boots.  Nothing will turn a skier into a snowboarder faster than poorly fitted boots.  Being in the business for awhile now, I have seen it more than a few times   Not just skis either; bicycles are another obvious example; a poorly fitted bike is as useful as a pair of shoes 3 sizes too large. 

That is why these forums are so helpful: there is always advice available from people who actually use the gear and can give you an honest opinion.  Which is why the suggested donation of $35 for membership is such a great deal: it can save you a whole lot of money and effort if it helps you narrow down a ski search or pick out a great instructor.   
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post





A whole set up for < $200?


You wouldn't be from Detroit by any chance?


Ooo! The Paris Expedition! I have one of those!

Really, I do. I add PVC piping to create the arms to hold the sled back, attach them to a climbing harness to attach to me and I have a inexpesive, lightweight and effective sled for carrying my load, getting it off my back. Great for a day long slog into a base camp.
post #19 of 28
Didn't realize what kind of forum I was getting into when I get ripped apart after my 1st post!

I wouldhave been happy to purchase my equipment from a "ski shop" but living in Omaha Nebraska has it's limitations. I went to where I thought I would be given good service, and in my personal opinion I was.  The salesman said he worked as a ski instructor for 15 years in Utah, and then 5 years in Colorado.  Should I not take the advice he gives me?

And why is this a bad boot unless my "foot resembles a horses hoof"? If you give a statement like that don't just be a (as you so eloquently put it) "DICK". Help a beginner out and clarify it.

I went into this whole process with the thought in mind that the boot IS the #1 most important thing to purchase which is why I tried on every pair they had in stock, and asked extensive questions about each set. After trying on the pair I eventually purchased, he gave me the rundown on performance and fit and they seemed to be the best bang for the buck.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JDoyal View Post



Please realize I am not trying to be a dick but, those boots are nowhere near decent unless your foot resembles a horses hoof. Plus I am sure the guy helping you did not know the first thing about how to properly fit a boot. If I sound harsh it is because I see this almost everyday. Person goes into a big sporting goods store, buys a boot that ends up bring too big and they either suffer with it or give up the sport. Boots are THE #1 most important piece of gear you will buy. If a person is on a budget, I tell them to get a good set of boots, from a compitent bootfiiter and rent skis the first year. You will end up in a much better position down the road
 
post #20 of 28
Check out the deals on www.evogear.com/outlet/default

You can find a beginner ski/binding for under 2 bills.
post #21 of 28
I said the "horses hoof" comment because that is what the inside of that boot is like, a big wide open cave. It is a boot that works for people with wide feet. Also just because a person is or has been a ski instructor does not mean they know anything about fitting a boot, I have worked with many very high level instructors and many do not anything about bootfitting, it is not really their #1 concern. Sorry you don't have any real shops near you, but how are we supposed to know that? FWIW I really was not trying to be a jerk, I even said not to take it that way, but it seems you still did. 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkirke View Post

Didn't realize what kind of forum I was getting into when I get ripped apart after my 1st post!

I wouldhave been happy to purchase my equipment from a "ski shop" but living in Omaha Nebraska has it's limitations. I went to where I thought I would be given good service, and in my personal opinion I was.  The salesman said he worked as a ski instructor for 15 years in Utah, and then 5 years in Colorado.  Should I not take the advice he gives me?

And why is this a bad boot unless my "foot resembles a horses hoof"? If you give a statement like that don't just be a (as you so eloquently put it) "DICK". Help a beginner out and clarify it.

I went into this whole process with the thought in mind that the boot IS the #1 most important thing to purchase which is why I tried on every pair they had in stock, and asked extensive questions about each set. After trying on the pair I eventually purchased, he gave me the rundown on performance and fit and they seemed to be the best bang for the buck.
 


 
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDoyal View Post


I said the "horses hoof" comment because that is what the inside of that boot is like, a big wide open cave. It is a boot that works for people with wide feet. Also just because a person is or has been a ski instructor does not mean they know anything about fitting a boot, I have worked with many very high level instructors and many do not anything about bootfitting, it is not really their #1 concern. Sorry you don't have any real shops near you, but how are we supposed to know that? FWIW I really was not trying to be a jerk, I even said not to take it that way, but it seems you still did. 

 

Sausage foot/bucket boot!  Horses hoof: hadn't heard that one before, although it effectively conveys your point!
post #23 of 28

Hate to break it to you but I just spent almost 700$ on a pair of skis and bindings...and that was when they were on sale!  If you want somthing halfway decent your going to have to pay at least 300

post #24 of 28
You will likely need to spend more than 200 on boots and fitting.

If you know how to ski, you can pick up straight skis for next to nothing.  It takes a little more effort to ski them, but it's still skiing.

I recommend you invest 20 bucks in real skiers, then haunt e-bay, and various stores for out-dated skis that are still "new in wrapper". 
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkirke View Post

If you give a statement like that don't just be a (as you so eloquently put it) "DICK". 
 


You start a thread [in the wrong forum] asking for ideas on buying gear, a boot fitter replies and you call him a dick.

This all within 24 hours of joining.
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jag View Post




You start a thread [in the wrong forum] asking for ideas on buying gear, a boot fitter replies and you call him a dick.

This all within 24 hours of joining.
 

Actually it was King4227 that started the thread (in the wrong forum).

Lots of newbies of questionable, errr, ahh, ummm, talent joining recently. Loserzo...ooops, Alpinezone refugees since apparently nobody wants to spend the $169 to buy it?
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by King4227 View Post

Alright, im looking for ideas for a nice reliable set of skis,bindings, and boots, that won't have me paying a ton. i want to have fun skiing but im not ready to drop a couple hundred of dollars
 

To inject a little reality into the conversation:

You don't need the latest, greatest gear to ski Michigan.  When I started out about a decade ago I went to Play It Again Sports and picked up boots, skis with bindings and (new) poles for under $100.  That gear got me through two seasons.

In retrospect, the boots didn't fit all that well, and the skis were so-so, but it got me out on the hill learning and exploring. And it was far superior to the rental gear available at the time. I'd go that route if you're looking to do it on the cheap.

Better gear will definitely make it easier, but I know people who can out-ski me by a good margin on old crap gear so don't get too hung up on the hardware. 

Some tips:  boots are the most important piece of gear and they should fit snugly.  Take the liner out, put your foot in the shell and place your fingers behind your heel - if there's more than two fingers width behind the heel, the shell is too big.  The most common mistake is buying boots that are too big.

As for skis, pretty much anything in the "all mountain" or "carving" ski will work for Michigan. Poles can be found for $5 at the re-use center and as long as they're the right length it doesn't matter.

And, BTW, don't listen to the people who tell you to buy straight skis.  Sure, you can buy them for $10 a pair, but unless you are already proficient on them and want to stay in the 80s technology-wise they're a bad deal.
post #28 of 28
and Walt provides the best advice so far on this thread.

Really, just because everyone on here is a gear junkie doesn't mean everyone who is new to the sport should run out and buy custom footbeds and high end boots. A pair of $100 craigslist skis and entry level boots make a lot more sense for the guy who might ski a few times and doesn't want to spend $700.
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