EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › An all-mountain east coast ski for an ex-racer
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

An all-mountain east coast ski for an ex-racer

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I was a former racer who suffered 6 knee surgeries and have only been on snow twice in the past six years. Gonna give it a go again.

Can you recommend a ski for me? I don't have any loyalty although I raced on Stockli's.  

And do you think I should stick in the low to mid 170s for the first year, then get something in the 180s?

Thanks! 
post #2 of 23
You said all mountain.  I have skied the Nordica Top Fuel for the past 4 years and I have been trying to find a ski to replace them.  So far I am leaning towards the Top Fuel.  It's a ski that performs yet it has a fairly big sweet spot.  I can keep up with my friends who ski on gs race skis and the TF makes nice gs turns.

The ski has titanium so it is a stiff ski.  I can ski it in the bumps but that's not where it shines - but I do like to ski it in the bumps.  In soft snow if you set a hard edge it goes deep, deep as in right to the dirt if the base isn't solid.  It is not great in powder, but it a freight train in crud, which is what we get a lot of in the East.

I don't get to ski that many skis, but the Top Fuel is one fine ski.  It's good for someone who skis a little heavy.  It varies it's turns well.

You mentioned Stockli - great ski.  Talk to Whiteroom, they sell a lot of them and he knows gear.  I'd like a Stockli myself.

Maybe we can hear from others who have a broader base from which to refer.
Edited by Paul Jones - 12/14/09 at 5:56am
post #3 of 23

I'm an aging ex-racer myself, and I finally decided to try something other than race stock GS skis as my "normal" everyday skis about 5-6 years ago. I also ski in the Northeast, and ski everything except bumps....unless they are super soft, and I have no other choice. I have two pairs of Stockli Stormrider XL's. The year with the red, white and blue flame graphics, as well as the following generation with the brown/orange textured topsides. Both are a 184. I love them for an all round ski. Race ski laminated construction. Top quality materials. Smaller turn radius than a GS ski, and wider under foot by a touch. For 90% of my skiing days, they are perfect. I can ski them like a GS ski, but make smaller turns, and they are great in crud. They are not great in powder. They are great on any hard surface. You need to be on them, and on the front of the boot to ski them well. For me, they have been pretty close to perfect. I'm dreading when they give out, and may buy a leftover pair to hold onto. I still have newer GS skis, SL skis, and powder skis, but 95% of the time, I find myself reaching for the Stormriders.

post #4 of 23
I can second the Stockli XL recommendation.  I skied a 168 cm Stockli GS 2002 for several years when I switched from old 195 cm. straight skis here in the Northeast as my everyday ski and switched to a 2005 SC which was a lot more forgiving.  Early last year I bought a used second generation XL and have not used my other skis since.  I even take them out West and only rented powder skis once when I encountered a ridiculously huge dump at Kirkwood.

I ski mostly at MRG and find them perfect for pretty much everything.  I already have two brand new pairs sitting around for when I retire the original pair.  Hopefully I'm set for life!

As for length, I wouldn't know as you haven't mentioned your height or weight.  Mine are 164's, I love them in the woods and moguls, but I'm a shrimp at 5' 3" and 130 lbs.

Joseph
post #5 of 23
I'm 230 lbs., and I love the 184. Tried a 194, and it was no more stable for me than the 184, and just too much length for everyday use. Basically a wide waisted GS ski at that length. So we have "small" at 164cm, and "large" at 184cm. Hope it helps. Highly recommend the ski.
post #6 of 23
This extremely washed up ex-racer recently picked up some Dynastar Contact 4x4 in 178.  I just have a day on them, but they have a nice GS ski feel , but like the ex-racer on them, are a bit fatter and softer than the real thing.  I'm pretty sure they will be my most used ski this winter.
post #7 of 23
Some skis I really like:

Dynastar Contact 4x4
Head Peak 78/Peak 82/Peak 88 (latter may be more width that you are looking for)
Blizzard Magnum 8.1 Max
Elan 82Xti
Stocki XL
Kastle MX78
Fischer Cool or Cold Heat: no longer produced, easily found on Ebay for cheap
Nordica Jet Fuel ti/Nitrous Ti

If you want more of a carver, you can add to the list:
Fischer Progressor 9+
Elan Speedwave 14
Nordica Speedwave 3
Head Supershape Magnum

All of these share some of the race characteristics and feel of their more hard-snow oriented cousins.  None of them are really dumbed-down all-mountain boards; more of a high performance, frontside/versatile ski that skis more powerfully than some "all-mountain" designs.
post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
 Thanks all!

I'm 6'3, 210. About 80% of where I was before I got injured, fitness wise.

You think the XL 184 won't be too much? I'm afraid I won't be able to control them...

What will I lose if I get the 174?

Paul: Do you ski at West, or head up to Gore/Whiteface? Would love to catch up one day during winter break if you'd like..
Edited by mbp67 - 12/14/09 at 1:06am
post #9 of 23
I ski Jiminy Peak, Killington, MRG, Stowe and once in a while Jay.  Have only been to Gore once!  I like VT.

Let me know if you want to go.
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbp67 View Post

 Thanks all!

I'm 6'3, 210. About 80% of where I was before I got injured, fitness wise.

You think the XL 184 won't be too much? I'm afraid I won't be able to control them...

What will I lose if I get the 174?

Paul: Do you ski at West, or head up to Gore/Whiteface? Would love to catch up one day during winter break if you'd like..


 


My guess is that you don't give up much with a Stormrider XL in a 174 vs the 184. The 184 is a lot of ski. Most of my skiing is on groomed, buffed cruisers, and I decided to try something more versatile than a real GS ski. I did not want something close to a SL ski, with a short radius that just wanted to turn, turn and turn some more. Have SL's for that. The 184 skis long in terms of it's stability,but it's a lot more "fun" than a GS ski. I'm sure that somebody will weigh in on a 174, and say the same. I will say, again, that the ski rewards good skiing. My hunch is that the 174 might be a good choice.  I have not skied one of the latest versions of the ski, though.
post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 
 Want to sell an old version? :P

Or know a place besides fleebay where I could find an older model? I didn't see much on there currently.
post #12 of 23
Talk to Whiteroom.
post #13 of 23
Denver Wholesale Skis has New 2006-7 184 XLs.  No 174s unfortunately-

http://cgi.ebay.com/06-07-Stockli-Stormrider-XL-Mid-Fat-Skis-184cm-NEW_W0QQitemZ300348252729QQcmdZViewItemQQptZSkiing?hash=item45ee26a239

I bought my spare 164s from them.
post #14 of 23
Thread Starter 
 How do the 164s act for you?

Not too short? It's stable at speed?
post #15 of 23
My first reaction comparing them to my GS skis was to wish I had gone for the 174s because I thought they were a little unstable at speed, but it didn't take me long to find out they were incredibly stable once keeping them on edge became ingrained and I didn't have to think about it.

Believe me, I have had a lot of "ego" problems over using shorter skis, but have come to realize I am having much more fun skiing much more difficult terrain than ever before because of them.

I guess that means I would recommend for you the 174s over the 184s?
post #16 of 23

Hi,

Nope, I'm not selling!  I am going to buy another older 184 at some point, in fact. The 184 really skis like a GS ski, with a slightly shorter {still 20m+} radius, but wider under foot. It's a very stable ski, at speed, and it handles the occasional crud, etc, well. It likes carving bigger turns, and it's a good match, as I do too. It's more versatile than a GS ski in terms of skidding shorter radius turns {you can only really carve to the radius of the ski, after all}. I can't remember the radius of the 174, but it's quite a bit less. I don't find that my skis need to be going rail to rail on edge all of the time. They're also much less of a one trick pony than a true race stock GS ski, in terms of the occasional bump...some softish snow, etc. It's a great ski on any hard surface.

I bet that if you post a few WTB on a few sites, you might find a pair of 174's.  

 

I think that Stowe's been mentioned. Today's Edge sells Stockli, or at least did. I think that Perhaps the Basin does at Killington. Stockli has a lot of good product. Big fan, having skied quite a few skis over the years.

post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTripodi View Post

My first reaction comparing them to my GS skis was to wish I had gone for the 174s because I thought they were a little unstable at speed, but it didn't take me long to find out they were incredibly stable once keeping them on edge became ingrained and I didn't have to think about it.

Believe me, I have had a lot of "ego" problems over using shorter skis, but have come to realize I am having much more fun skiing much more difficult terrain than ever before because of them.

I guess that means I would recommend for you the 174s over the 184s?



 
Maybe the 164s would be a good idea for the first year out. What do you think? Can you - or anybody else for that matter - tell me what I won't get with a 164 ski that I will find with a 184? (As those seem my only two options) 

I will admit when I tried a GS ski I was unable to handle it post-surgeries. But that could be because it was my first day back, etc, etc.. 

What do you think?
post #18 of 23
Last year's Head iM88 Monster.   Can do it all and has race ski construction....but no plate...and its all the better for it.
post #19 of 23
Kastle MX78 with the KTi plate, in a 176 will give you a real nice go fast feel. The Stocklis are nice as is the flat Nordica HR Pro. 
post #20 of 23
Quote:
"Maybe the 164s would be a good idea for the first year out. What do you think? Can you - or anybody else for that matter - tell me what I won't get with a 164 ski that I will find with a 184? (As those seem my only two options) 

I will admit when I tried a GS ski I was unable to handle it post-surgeries. But that could be because it was my first day back, etc, etc.. 

What do you think?"



It's hard to say.  At my size I find the 164s very easy and comfortable and very forgiving.  If you plan some slow and careful skiing for awhile I'm sure you could get by, but at your height and height I think they would feel sort of more like a slalom ski.  For you, the lack of surface area might make them feel less like an all mountain ski in softer conditions.  I bet bumps would be a blast?

I noticed Denver Wholesale has some 174 Stormrider ATs (the red ones) which I remember reading some rave reviews about in the past.  If I remember correctly I think they were thought of as a slightly more forgiving XL.  You might want to check them out.  Perhaps someone familiar with them could chime in?
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTripodi View Post


 

Hey JTripodi,
I couldn't help notice that you have Stockli Snakes in your picture!  Do you like them?  I've got a pair in 170cm that I skied once and wasn't happy with the tune on them.  The tails really seemed to hang up and the skis were very slow.  When I checked the bases with a true bar, they were concave in the tails.  How are they at MRG?  Good in bumps?  Are yours mounted on the powder or park line?
post #22 of 23
mohrgan,

My Snakes.  A rather long story.  I borrowed the snakes from a friend of mine a few years back to take out to Snowbird.  (I thought back then that an 80mm. waist ski was a fat powder board!)  They are mounted 1cm forward of the powder position because my boots exploded out in Snowbird and when I was fitted for new boots the boot fitter felt that my old boots were two! sizes too large and the new boots were too small to adjust the bindings.  The shop decided just to move the heel piece forward a bit to avoid the old holes, etc.  Of course my friend was a little disconcerted so I ended up buying them from him.  I had them tuned up by Rick at Ski Sharp in Waitsfield and found them to be very fast (did very well in some ski-cross races) and fine in every respect except one- I'm just not big and strong enough to bend them without excessive exertion!  I didn't know that until I got on the 164 XLs.  Now I'm spoiled.

By the way, these Skis are also the 170s.  I would love to try the 160s sometime.  Never-the-less, the skis will have a new home this winter.  My friend and I have convinced another old friend to give up on his old 195 Rossignol 4Ss.  Finally!

Before you give up on yours I would highly recommend having Rick (www.skisharp.com) take a go at them.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTripodi View Post

mohrgan,

My Snakes.  A rather long story.  I borrowed the snakes from a friend of mine a few years back to take out to Snowbird.  (I thought back then that an 80mm. waist ski was a fat powder board!)  They are mounted 1cm forward of the powder position because my boots exploded out in Snowbird and when I was fitted for new boots the boot fitter felt that my old boots were two! sizes too large and the new boots were too small to adjust the bindings.  The shop decided just to move the heel piece forward a bit to avoid the old holes, etc.  Of course my friend was a little disconcerted so I ended up buying them from him.  I had them tuned up by Rick at Ski Sharp in Waitsfield and found them to be very fast (did very well in some ski-cross races) and fine in every respect except one- I'm just not big and strong enough to bend them without excessive exertion!  I didn't know that until I got on the 164 XLs.  Now I'm spoiled.

By the way, these Skis are also the 170s.  I would love to try the 160s sometime.  Never-the-less, the skis will have a new home this winter.  My friend and I have convinced another old friend to give up on his old 195 Rossignol 4Ss.  Finally!

Before you give up on yours I would highly recommend having Rick (www.skisharp.com) take a go at them.
 

Thanks for the info.  Yes, I have had Rick tune my Stormriders and he does a great job!  I bought the Snakes last year at the end of the season and I think the bases are just oxidized or something.   They are 5 year old skis that were still wrapped in plastic!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › An all-mountain east coast ski for an ex-racer