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edges slightly grayish

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
well, finally got to ski yesterday, great day and i was happy with my waxing (first time) results. the temp was alot colder than i expected, i used a universal wax, not cold. i looked at some of the skis and boards (i have about 4 pairs of skis and 2 boards that were used yesterday for myself and girfriend and her kids) and on one of the boards and two pairs of skis the base along the edge was slightly grayish, is this because of the cold temps, mostly manmade snow (i live in NY, skied Bellayre Mountain) and the fact that i used universal wax? Its not horrible but is noticable. Im  gonna maybe try a colder wax for next time, gonna hot wax and scrape them again to clean them. anything else i should do to try to prevent this? thank you,
                                           Craig
post #2 of 17
Glad to hear your waxing is showing positive results.

The grayish is often referred to as Base Burn. The cold, abrasive man-made snow causes this and is more evident along the edges due to turning. Universal waxes are typically a low melt, soft wax than performance waxes in the same temperature range. Anyone skiing man-made and abrasive snows should apply a high-melt, durable hard base prep wax periodically to last longer to protect your bases, regardless of temperature. Some will routinely wax along the area you are seeing with hard wax and use the WOTD for the rest of the ski or snowboard.
post #3 of 17
I have found it is very tough to prevent the condition you are describing here in the northeast, especially if you like to run fast and get the skis up on edge. Artificial snow is very abrasive.

Three ways I deal with it:

  1. Wax every day
  2. Lay down a coat of cold wax first. I use Toko Blue. But, can be tiresome to work with. It requires a very hot iron and is tough to scrape, if you let it cool completely, like you should. Your arm will get tired of brushing it, too.
  3. Dribble and iron in some cold powder (I use Toko, but there are others) along the area where the base burn occurs.

Also, Holmenkol Beta is a very good wax to use in the northeast. Has a wide temperature range and runs a little on the harder side.
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
thanks guys, im gonna try some of the harder wax i got from  Alpinord to see how that works
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkers View Post

thanks guys, im gonna try some of the harder wax i got from  Alpinord to see how that works

Suggestion:  run a hotscrape cycle with your usual wax AND a little bit of the harder stuff just before you do your final coat.
post #6 of 17
monkers   I can recommend the Briko-Maplus Race Base Medium Wax from Alpinord (SLIDEWRIGHT). A  harder wax with long durability,great glide in temps from -5f to +32f. Also as good a base burn protector as I've found without going all out with several extra steps (powders or extra hard waxes taking much more prep time). The best 'Universal Wax' choice I've tried.
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkers View Post

thanks guys, im gonna try some of the harder wax i got from  Alpinord to see how that works
The Briko-Maplus Race Base Hard you have is among the hardest wax available as far as I know. It's tough to scrape and brush so use very little. I suppose mixing it with the universal could put it in the neighborhood of the medium. Definitely err towards harder wax in the NE.
post #8 of 17
Did you cycle the wax in ahead of time?  I got maybe 4-5 cycles of straight paraffin and then another 4-5 cycles of toko universal then skied hard for 4 days straight with no rewaxing.  My skis and my daughters looked like they didn't need wax on the 4th day and no graying.

I think the trick is to cycle it in several times.

I did wax them Friday and skied them Sat and Sun.  Same results; they look fresh and are ready to go.

My inexperience pushes me to believe that getting the skis saturated with wax INSIDE (not on) is the key.  The type of wax you use has an effect but to a lesser effect.

The 4 days were;  1 @ Mt. Snow and 3 @ Stratten.  All but one day was man made.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post


The Briko-Maplus Race Base Hard you have is among the hardest wax available as far as I know. It's tough to scrape and brush so use very little. I suppose mixing it with the universal could put it in the neighborhood of the medium. Definitely err towards harder wax in the NE.

This is a big part of the of the reason I say:

Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

Suggestion:  run a hotscrape cycle with your usual wax AND a little bit of the harder stuff just before you do your final coat.
 
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post


The Briko-Maplus Race Base Hard you have is among the hardest wax available as far as I know. It's tough to scrape and brush so use very little. I suppose mixing it with the universal could put it in the neighborhood of the medium. Definitely err towards harder wax in the NE.

 


QFT

I made the mistake of laying it on a little too thick the first time, I think I spent a whole day scraping/brushing.


Once you get the hang of it the hard base is bomber for the manmade ice crystals we call snow. I way all mys skis with this 2-3x to start a season, then overlay with softer waxes as conditions dictate.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post

I made the mistake of laying it on a little too thick the first time, I think I spent a whole day scraping/brushing.

   You didn't re-iron and semi-hot scrape?  
Mechanical engineers. 

(fwiw I've done it too)
post #12 of 17
You can get the base burn because of the harder courser man made snow. Instead of doing the full skis in harder and usually colder temperature wax, you can try a check out a few things. Make sure you are not scraping too hard on the edges. Stay even on pressure along the scraper (do not flex it or push too hard just above where your 2 hands are holding it- many times this is over the 2 outside edges) and therefore leaving too much wax on the center of the skis and none on the outside edges.

If the technique in OK then you can get some harder wax - colder temperature is OK, or a colder powder additive and just lay this down (crayon technique works well if not using the powder)  the first 1/2 inch or so (or the width of the burn) on the edge of the ski and mix in the universal wax. I believe Swix tuning videos have a discussion on this trick. You can save the use of wax if the universal is working OK for glide, and you just need the edge protection for the burn that happens when the skis are up on edge carving through the harder stuff described in the conditions. Finally some will do a restorative wax on the complete ski- something like the Dominator Renew series or any of the other companies waxes that is designed to restore a dry or base renewing properties instead of just a universal wax.
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
thanks guys for all the help
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
welll, i hot scraped them 2 times to clean, then used the hard wax, my girlfriends son skied on them for a full day with the ski team and i looked at them last night. they are not as bad as the first time but you can still see the grayish on one edge of each ski, more pronounced under the boot area, ill try cycleing the soft wax a few more cycles then the hard wax again, ill get it eventually! lol  thank you everyone for all your help and suggestions
                   Craig
post #15 of 17
You can beef up any wax you have against this problem by sprinkling on this powder in the problem areas as you wax:

http://www.racewax.com/product/FA-1216/SWIX_CH3_Cold_Powder_Ski_Wax__FA1216.html
post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
so you would hot scrape to clean, then apply this powder, scrape and brush, then apply cold wax?
post #17 of 17
Swix LF3 powder along the edges under the binding along with your regular wax.  Its a constant battle especially with race skis in cold/dry conditions.
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