or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Back to skiing after 5-6years off, Volkl supersport superspeeds a bad idea?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Back to skiing after 5-6years off, Volkl supersport superspeeds a bad idea?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I found a pretty good deal on a set of volkl superspeeds, based on reviews they sound like what i want, although i was looking more for allstars. The "expert level" thing is the only thing making me think twice. Are they really that hard to ski? I considered myself advanced when i stopped skiing a while back.

Im not scared to bust my a$$ a few times to get a hang of them, and don't quite almost anything. Any input would be awesome.

I would love a pair of tigersharks 10-12's but $$ is a big factor at the moment.
post #2 of 15
I have a pair. They are stiff and specialize in going fast on hard snow. Wouldn't reccomend as your only ski.
post #3 of 15
Keep searching  for the AllStars



Also, check out TramDock.com.  They have been trying to unload some 12ft tigersharks lately.
post #4 of 15
Good advice on the allstars. A very very good ski. 
post #5 of 15
Typically, any ski with the name 'Speed' in it is likely going to be a handful for casual skiing. I also suspect the Allstars are probably going to be a tad too aggressive in nature for someone who hasn't skied in years.It's not that you wouldn't be able to ski on the above skis, they just probably won't be the best option for someone re-introducing themselves to the sport. IMO, of course.

If you search the net you can find some good deals in the Dynastar Contact line. Google the phrase and you should find some shops with good deals. You might want to look for the Contact 9 or 10. Both are very good skis and you won't need to always be aggressive to get the best out of them, as you would with the Speed and Allstar.

Other deals you can look for are the Head XRC800 or last years Head IM76. You can find the 76 for around $250 w/o binding. You can also find good deals on prior year Fischer RX8 but I wouldn't wait too long to search for these as the good sizes go fast.

Personally, I would stay away from the high-end burly models for now.
post #6 of 15
Mojo man- you are right. The allstars do take a bit of work-not something you want to step into after a long layoff. I did not read the initial post correctly.

However, if he gets back into it, by the end of the season he might appreicate the allstars....
post #7 of 15
I think skill level would be important too. Even with skill, however, I would say they are not for someone who isn't willing to let them run and use a hard edge rather than slipping or skidding their turns.

I just had a bad experience with them. I am in very good shape-- 190 pounds 6'2" and the 175 Allstars I demoed a few years back were a chore unless I was always riding them at speeds I normally do not prefer to ski at.  I must say, however, If you want a good workout for the legs and abductors, get the Allstars and ski them at a moderate, relaxed pace all day. Your glutes will be burning by lunchtime. You will get your ski legs back into shape in no time !

It was a few years ago when I demoed them. Volkl put a lot of metal in that ski. I also demo'd the Fischer WC RC at the time and thougt the Fischer's were soft and relaxed in comparison.

If you do go with the ski, I would advise a length shorter than what you normally ski on.
 

Allstar is a lot of ski -- more ski than most skiers on the hill would ever need, IMO.

post #8 of 15
They are not hard to ski.  This "expert" business is flattery, pure and simple.  If they didn't call them expert skis, then rich people who want the best skis wouldn't buy them.

That being said, if you are not skiing fast on hard snow, they will not be the right tool for the job and you are better off with something else. 
post #9 of 15
Two skis from Volkl I was always interested in and never skied the 6 Star and the SuperSpeed. Both reported to be very good hard snow skis.  Maybe I don't get it, but when you are typically skiing on boiler plate , a stiff ski can allow these conditions to be more enjoyable. Just my $.02 and it might be warped.
post #10 of 15
I have had both five and six stars as well as superspeeds.
The superspeeds are too stiff for casual use by any but a big guy.
Too much metal.
The six stars are not exactly limp.
I keep my old five stars for guests and they work well on groomed snow for all but novices.
Currently I ski racetigers for NASTAR and the old red AC-4's for cruising with my wife.
I don't like the AC 30 and AC 50's.
Too stiff for cruising at 5'6" and 175 pounds.
post #11 of 15
 Good skis as long as you want to carve turns on hard groomed snow at high speed.  For anything/everything else, there are *much* better choices.
post #12 of 15
I have skied the allstar (First Year Black Ones) for the last 4 years.  I read how difficult they were to ski etc ... however I went for it and have absolutely loved them. 

Keep in mind ... yes they are stiff, however have terrific edge hold ... not great in beyond a foot of snow, but in these parts it never happens cuz the groomers are out full force at the hint of a snowfall. LOL

For the record it should be noted that I'm approaching 50 and am not ashamed to admit that I enjoy skiing hardpack groomers 75% of the time.

Good luck.

RMP  







 
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

They are not hard to ski.  This "expert" business is flattery, pure and simple.  If they didn't call them expert skis, then rich people who want the best skis wouldn't buy them.

That being said, if you are not skiing fast on hard snow, they will not be the right tool for the job and you are better off with something else. 
 

I was't calling them expert skis in the sense that one needs to have exeprt skills to use them. It's just that my impression was they are burly, stiff, and need speed and do not like to be soft-edged without putting up a good figh that will turn your legs to rubber in a short period of time. Anyone can ski them. The question boils down to, how much work do you want to do in the process? If you liking carving at realtively high speeds, you would probably love them and won't need to manhandle the skis. If you are a moderate/lower speed skier who prefers finesse and brushed turns, you are going to get quite a workout indeed.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post




I was't calling them expert skis in the sense that one needs to have exeprt skills to use them. It's just that my impression was they are burly, stiff, and need speed and do not like to be soft-edged without putting up a good figh that will turn your legs to rubber in a short period of time. Anyone can ski them. The question boils down to, how much work do you want to do in the process? If you liking carving at realtively high speeds, you would probably love them and won't need to manhandle the skis. If you are a moderate/lower speed skier who prefers finesse and brushed turns, you are going to get quite a workout indeed.
Hey Mojo,
Pretty good call. I didn't notice you calling them expert.  I was just responding to the original poster. What you say is true enough.  They were not designed to be soft-edged.  They will fight you if you try and out-muscle them.  Don't tell them to turn right and push them to the left!  They will also feel like dead lumps at slow speeds.

I don't think you need to be an expert to tip these skis onto their edges and rail some fun turns on the hardpack.  You just need to enjoy skiing at a brisk pace, with finese if you like too, but fast.  You don't need to work hard to ski them at all.  You just need to work smart.  And if you try and get them out of their groove, well you'll learn not to do that. 

Of course it's very rewarding to work hard and smart too.
post #15 of 15
 My 2 cents.

After being out of skiing for 9 years and jumping back onto my 1987 Rossignol E750s... I decided to go for the Volkl Tigershark 10 foot.  I have really enjoyed them on my Eastern PA hardpack/ice/etc...  They carve like they're on rails (121-73-105).  Certainly not a one-quiver ski... although I found that for a 'first ski' after all those years, and for the type of snow I have easy access to (Poconos) they have worked really really well.

Let us know what you end up with,

mm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Back to skiing after 5-6years off, Volkl supersport superspeeds a bad idea?