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FREEEZING fingers... Because of gloves???

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
hello,


  Well I just wanted to do a little test to see how warm my gear (gloves, coat, ski pants) really is so I went on about a 30 minute walk in my new ski pants and coat. My core temp was fine and I felt pretty warm but my fingers quikly began to become very cold in my gloves. The gloves weren't moist when I took my gloves off (they are made by HEAD and feel decent)  but my fingers began to feel very cold. Anyone have any suggestions for me to do for cold hands? Hand warmers would just seem uncomfortable.

Any advice?
post #2 of 19
 A good pair of glove liners might be in order. You can get very thin ones that still give a good deal of warmth. Usually they come in synthetic (i.e. polypropelene), silk, or merino wool. The synthetic ones do a decent job, but in my experience can get a little wet after a while. I think the silk ones don't offer much in the way of insulation, they're more meant for wicking moisture (which doesn't seem like it's what you need). I just ordered some merino wool ones, so I don't have any experience with them per se, but generally merino wool is pretty warm, and does a good job of staying relatively dry.

The other options of course are get different gloves. Quality and warmth definitely varies. Mittens are warmer, but if you don't like the feel or loss of dexterity, a lot of manufacturers make 3-finger/crab claw type gloves, which have a standard glove for your thumb and index finger, but your other 3 fingers are in a mitt - makes zippers and things easier.
post #3 of 19
Are you sure your coat is warm enough? The first thing your body does to keep your core warm is restrict blood flow. Sure your core might feel just fine but that is at the expense of your fingers. Your core should be warm without your body having to work to keep it warm. This way your body works to keep your extremities warm.

For me I wear mittens while skiing. I have always had trouble regulating my body temp. The difference in activity between sitting on the chair lift and skiing makes it very hard to dress. unfortunately my hands and toes suffer. At least with mittens I can make a fist in the gloves and get the fingers to warm up on the chair.
post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I was wearing just a plain cotton t-shirt when I tried so do you think I will need to buy something else to go on my skin under my coat? Also if my fingers still are cold up on the slopes (I may go this weekend, supposed to be about 35 degrees down here at the mouth of the canyon on saturday) and if I bought a glove liner would that mean I wear the whole glove just over the liner?
post #5 of 19
 If all you're wearing under a jacket is a cotton t-shirt, definitely invest in better underlayers. Cotton in particular is pretty awful - it absorbs moisture, so if you're out for any extended period of time, you're going to be in a very sweaty, very wet, and very cold tshirt. Doesn't matter how great the rest of your clothing is at that point.

Get an appropriate top - something that wicks moisture (i.e. synthetic or merino wool). Then experiment with layering up your core to see if that helps the cold hands issue.
post #6 of 19
 Add a vest under the coat.
post #7 of 19
Another contributing factor to the cold fingers that was partially alluded to is restricted blood flow. I personally have poor circulation in my extremities so my fingers and toes are always cold even right now sitting 5 feet from my fire place. If this is the case I have to wear glove warmers on really cold days and warm them up because it gets to the point that I can't move my fingers.
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Ok will do.


Can you say about the liners and gloves and such? Like do you put the liner on your hand then put a glove ovet that or what?
post #9 of 19
I wear Smartwool glove liners with my ski gloves and my hands are almost always warm enough.  The wool wicks the perspiration well and they are thin enough to let me have some dexterity when I am trying to find something in my coat or camelback while out on the slopes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by drainbamage View Post

Ok will do.


Can you say about the liners and gloves and such? Like do you put the liner on your hand then put a glove ovet that or what?
post #10 of 19
Think of gloves like a sleeping bag. If you get into them cold, they will stay that way.

I think the gloves are just too thin.

I'd go with some Burton AK, Dakine Apollo or Excusion, or the best are the Hestra gloves.

The Stoic brand by the Backcountry looks perty good. I don't know much about them yet though...

I have a few pair of gloves. Spring, Cold Dry days, Storm Days etc... all get a different glove.
post #11 of 19
I'm sure that you could find gloves that work, but I had an experienced skier tell me something interesting...he found that the cheapest, crappiest mittens he had ever worn for skiing were warmer than the fanciest, most expensive gloves. I had two sets of gloves that never kept my hands warm and finally bought some $30 mittens, and they've been great. I did just buy a set of liners for the very worst days, though, we'll see if I like them.
I don't use hand warmers very often, but they don't bother me when I do...my daughter insists upon them and I buy them in quantity at an LL Bean outlet store.
post #12 of 19
The key to warm, dry hands is this: 

1.  Ultrathin, snug-fitting, synthetic glove liners.  This is not an insulating layer per se, it is a wicking layer.  Merino wool is great for its lack of stink, but it is inferior to synthetics in its wicking ability.  Also, based on experience, merino glove liners fall apart faster. 

2. Big, warm, insulated Gore-tex mittens with long cuffs and a wrist leash.  If necessary, you can drop your mittens and they will dangle by the leash while you fiddle with your phone, iPod, radio, beacon, etc.  The liners will keep your hands from freezing solid for the few minutes it takes to, say, call your boss and explain that you're far, far too sick to come in today.

3.  Chemical handwarmers, bought in bulk from Costco.  Unwrap the handwarmers on your drive up the mountain and stick them inside the toe of your boots.  In the parking lot, transfer the warmers from boots to mittens.  Result: toasty boots and mittens.

Your hands will stay warm all day and never feel sweaty.  At the end of the day, take your liners off and reach inside your mitten.  You'll be amazed at how wet and nasty it is.  The wicking glove liner keeps you from feeling the dampness.
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Haha, I really was worrying about it too much, today it was snowing up at snowbird it was like 25-30 F and I was perfect. I dont think they groomed it so it was very bumpy and it was hard to pick out the bumps and pick your line but it was fun!
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post

The key to warm, dry hands is this: 

1.  Ultrathin, snug-fitting, synthetic glove liners.  This is not an insulating layer per se, it is a wicking layer.  Merino wool is great for its lack of stink, but it is inferior to synthetics in its wicking ability.  Also, based on experience, merino glove liners fall apart faster. 

2. Big, warm, insulated Gore-tex mittens with long cuffs and a wrist leash.  If necessary, you can drop your mittens and they will dangle by the leash while you fiddle with your phone, iPod, radio, beacon, etc.  The liners will keep your hands from freezing solid for the few minutes it takes to, say, call your boss and explain that you're far, far too sick to come in today.

3.  Chemical handwarmers, bought in bulk from Costco.  Unwrap the handwarmers on your drive up the mountain and stick them inside the toe of your boots.  In the parking lot, transfer the warmers from boots to mittens.  Result: toasty boots and mittens.

Your hands will stay warm all day and never feel sweaty.  At the end of the day, take your liners off and reach inside your mitten.  You'll be amazed at how wet and nasty it is.  The wicking glove liner keeps you from feeling the dampness.

 

This. Keep in mind that the problem might also be genetic. Some people just naturally have poor circulation to their fingers.
post #15 of 19
Nobody mentioned buying gloves slightly oversized so you get a bit more space off your fingertips for insulation.  I've got very long fingers & my fingertips always get cold by the end of the day because I can't find a glove long enough in the fingers. And I'm currently using Marmot Gore-tex Piste gloves in XXL - an excellent glove, but not long enough in the fingers.
post #16 of 19
What are you doing to insulate your head?

Keep the head and core warm. Keep your skin dry. Worry about gloves last. 
post #17 of 19
Drainbamage, if your coldness in your extremities seem abnormal, you might want to consult with your family physician for a condition known as Raynaud's disease.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/raynaudsdisease.html
post #18 of 19
I find that if I adjust the sleeves on my arms my hands get warm. It's just the bunched up clothing is cutting off my blood flow to the hands.

Hope it's that simple for you.

Or may take up a indoor activity....
post #19 of 19
Keep in mind that on real codl days you don't need goretex and it doesn't really breath that well. Consider a non-gore glove for uber cold days. less moisture= less cold.
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