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A question for instructors - Page 4

post #91 of 141
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by weems:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Vailrider:

Weems, with all due respect, I'm not sure that someone can be both an advocate for instructors and ski area management. If PSIA's mission is to give me the tools, why must I continue to pay annual dues after I've gotten them? My thought is my dues should do more for me then keep a national office employed and get me a few educational materials that may or may not work with what we are doing in our own division.
I disagree with you here, Vailrider, because I've seen people do both very well. I consider both Katie and her husband, Tony, to be perfect examples of drawing the balance, and I would bet you could ask anyone in their locker room and get agreement on that. The reason we can is that the pros, through their team leaders are intimately involved in management decisions. Therefore it makes it easy for a manager to not have to be torn between the two.</font>[/quote]I don't know Katie and Tony, but the level of management I'm thinking of doesn't have a locker in the instructors' locker room.
post #92 of 141
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Rusty Guy:
Oz,

I called a large ski school in the area, told them I was a level III cert, and learned they aren't hiring adult instructors this season.
If they hire instructors via a H2B visa, they may have crossed some legal lines. If not, it’s tough luck. Apply earlier next year.
post #93 of 141
Quote:
Originally posted by Vailrider:
So are you saying, from your experience with the board, the current board of directors would side or value the wishes of the ski area more then they would their instructor members?

And I think it would be the Department of Labor we would need to lobby not the INS.
I'm not sure she meant that. I do know that PSIA has to get along with the areas. Partly because the areas make great efforts to accomodate PSIA. For example, the tickets for the participants of clinics and exams are a donation by the areas. This donation is because the areas respect what PSIA is doing and wants to support it.

On visas, there are three different government departments: Labor for certification of need, Justice (INS) for visa approval, and State for visa issuance. It would be funny were it not so important for people's lives--both domestic and foreign.

Also, I know what you mean about management not being in the locker room. We try to spend a lot of time there, because that's where we find out what we need to do better.

Jeff, nice job on this thread. I appreciate your spirit of seeking information and feelings to do this new job better. This will be a great help to our members.
post #94 of 141
Quote:
Originally posted by weems:

However, having said all that, I wish to restate my original position. Individuals--in any endeavor--will usually benefit to the level of their contribution. I'll add that the benefit may not always be financial either. I've not made money in this business, and I've put a lot of work into it.

Nobody guaranteed that the world would be fair--only that it be real.[/QB]
What is wrong with making money? Why would instructor be ashamed to make a decent living? Is it a proof of lesser love for the sport? Is one as to suffer because of love as if without suffering it worth nothing? Wow, it brings me back to my catholic uprising and the guilt and suffering game

If skiing was a non profit organisation to serve the poor, that would be OK. The reality seems that the instructors have to suffer for their love of the sport meanwhile people pay a premium to ski and take lessons. Are the administrators (not only ski school managers) and major corporations ashamed to pocket the money? No. Are they there for the love of the sport or profits? I let let you answer that one. I'm pretty sure that the CEO of any of those company would not give away any of his bonus for the love of the mountain. There a lot of money into skiing. Why should we be ashamed of wanting some of it? Ski schools are profitable and are even the cow milk of some ski area. At my small area, the ski school generate more net profit than the cafeteria, the bar and the sale of lift tickets together. But we were still badly treated and paid in the name of love for the sport. Come on, this is America, not only for corporations but for individuals too!

[ September 30, 2003, 12:44 PM: Message edited by: Frenchie ]
post #95 of 141
Vailrider,

I don't think the BOD wants to get into labor relations, no matter what state/federal departments and bureaus may be involved. Frankly, I'm surprised to hear U.S. instructors calling for protectionism, but I live in Montana--where I'd love to see a little diversity.
post #96 of 141
Around here (New Hampshire) ski areas tend to like to hire foreign instructors, not for their expertise or certification but for the international flavor their accents bring to the ski school. Very few of the foreign instructors I've taught with had any kind of instructor certification and the ski school didn't seem to care. Most were young kids of college age who wanted a little foreign travel. The ski school tended to favor them with the choice assignments, private lessons etc. Even so I doubt any of them made enough to cover expenses. Thats probably why they seldom returned. The very very low pay is why ski areas here find it nearly impossible to hire any but retired people for their "full time" staff, except during times of high unemployment. The way the ski areas certify their need for foreign workers as required by INS rules, is to conduct a "hiring day" which they advertise only in the local resort paper, which is not circulated outside the resort. No one ever applies for a ski teaching job at these things so the area is able to apply for the necessary immigration permits. I'm not sure how they find their foreign applicants. My Austrian SSD used to get local kids from his village, sons and daughters of friends etc interested in a season in the US. There were always Argentinians, Australians, and the smattering of Brits, Germans etc. The ski areas recruit lifties etc. from a South African sports club that arranges for charters. they come over en masse for a season. Ingenious methods for finding a workforce willing to work for below subsistence levels of compensation. Are they taking jobs from American workers? Yes, in a sense, in that ski areas might be forced to raise their compensation if this low cost labor force were not available. It is nice to have diversity but I would feel a lot better about the situation if our guests' native countries were equally receptive to our beimg employed there.

[ September 30, 2003, 07:23 PM: Message edited by: arcadie ]
post #97 of 141
Quote:
Originally posted by arcadie:
Are they taking jobs from American workers? Yes, in a sense, in that ski areas might be forced cto raise their compensation if this low cost labor force were not available.[/QB]
My point precisely.

Nolo, PSIA is not a labor organization, however, it is an association. If membership wants jobs protected then isn't there some responsibility on the part of the BOD to do so? I'll bet most members would agree on this issue. I certainly could be mistaken.

I resided in Canada for three years. My wife was employed by an American corporation. You want to talk about protectionism. I could not work. I could not attend a class at a public university. All the while we were paying Canadian taxes.

Yes, I think PSIA should be working to help members find gainful employment as opposed to "siding" or sympathizing with SAM as they hire less expensive, non-certified instructors from foreign countries.
post #98 of 141
[quote]Originally posted by Rusty Guy:
Quote:
Originally posted by arcadie:
Yes, I think PSIA should be working to help members find gainful employment as opposed to "siding" or sympathizing with SAM as they hire less expensive, non-certified instructors from foreign countries.
The overwhelming majority of those who come across are on H2B visas. To get one of these you generally have to be certified to at least ISIA. There are exceptions to this rule, but not many though.

A lot of younger internationals would be working on a J1 visa. This is for full time university students only for a maximum of four months over the summer break. These are much more flexible as they entitle the bearer to work anywhere they want.
post #99 of 141
and your point?

OK, let me rephrase, I think PSIA should be protecting jobs for American ski instructors.
post #100 of 141
If the resorts didn't need OS instructors perhaps that would be a stronger position.

Since when was the PSIA a union rather than a body geared towards professional development?
post #101 of 141
Quote:
Originally posted by Seth:
A lot of younger internationals would be working on a J1 visa. This is for full time university students only for a maximum of four months over the summer break. These are much more flexible as they entitle the bearer to work anywhere they want.
A direct quote from a major resorts exit letter from last season.

"Unfortunately the economy is still trying to recover. Although we had a good season comparative to other areas, we still are below the expectations of stockholders and where we were 3 years ago. This means we need to trim full time staff and rely more on part timers when we are busy"

The boss told me just the same thing at my exit interview. To me it was so blatantly obvious during the winter that I choose not to dedicate anymore of my personal resources to the shareholders and leave.

So what this SAM business plan means for the PSIA is a major undermining of its activities by the hiring of "part time" staff many of whom come in on J1 visas or a paid vacation and have no need for the PSIA. The public pays full price for this part time, largely unqualified or low end retired certification instructors. Meanwhile the PSIA originating SAM training staff (the majority of whom are over 40) attempt to introduce direct parallel on the bunny hill using part time instructors (very nice people) with no long term dedication to the business

No wonder there was so much animosity towards the imports last winter AND I do not blame the locals one bit. They are getting screwed. For the good of the SS customers J1 and ISIA at Lev II Oz should not exist so as to dry up the cheap pool of labour and force the hand somewhat of the SAM to provide what they advertise. This all parallels Arcadies observations.

Nolo and Weems you are established dedicated professionals in the prime of your careers. Does the current SAM business model ensure that there will be enough Weems and Nolos to carry the industry forward? I think that is a huge question that goes begging for answers. How does the PSIA (or for that matter at home the APSI) figure in the long term future of SS …. mmmm not sure.
post #102 of 141
Quote:
Originally posted by Seth:
/qb]
The overwhelming majority of those who come across are on H2B visas. To get one of these you generally have to be certified to at least ISIA. There are exceptions to this rule, but not many though.

A lot of younger internationals would be working on a J1 visa. This is for full time university students only for a maximum of four months over the summer break. These are much more flexible as they entitle the bearer to work anywhere they want.[/QB][/quote]

I've worked with Austrian, British, Australian, Chilean, Argentinian, German, Austrian, Romanian, Finnish, Swiss nationals(I may have left out a few nationalities) as a ski instructor. Of these, only one Brit and possibly a couple of the Argentinians possessed the kind of certification you are talking about. Some were college students, some were definitely not. I mean how could you be a full time student and be teaching skiing in America full time during the ski season that ecompasses a large part of both semesters? Most were not what you would call particulary qualified ski instructors. I mean they could ski and they had enthusiasm and energy, pretty much like most of the staff but that they might have had some kind of high level certification is inconceivable to me.
I have no idea of the legality or illegality of their employment. There were always rumors of illegality and shady dealing but I can't verify any of that.
post #103 of 141
Big Sky has an Austrian ski school tradition and has brought a lot of talented full cert Europeans into Montana. I have been grateful for the diversity they have brought to the division. I think their preparation has been inspirational to many of us who have examined them when they sought PSIA credentials.
post #104 of 141
Arcadie the whole world doesn't have the same school timetable as the US.

Our summer break for university goes from the end of November to the beginning of March.
post #105 of 141
Quote:
Originally posted by Frenchie:
What is wrong with making money? Why would instructor be ashamed to make a decent living? Is it a proof of lesser love for the sport? Is one as to suffer because of love as if without suffering it worth nothing?
Hey, Frenchie! Nothing is wrong with making money. I agree with you. That's why we try our best to give the instructors the fairest biggest chunk we can in Aspen. We also try to give them access to the best customers we can. We also do our best to develop the best benefits we can.

I'm just throwing out a reality check here. This is the way it is now. And there are some companies that are fair and some that aren't. I think we should continue to strive for all of them to be. But the nature of capitalism is such that some don't share so generously.

But whether I make money or not, my only point is that rarely in this thread do I see a sense of "I'm in it, because I love teaching and the people I ski with." Nevertheless, I know that you all (the instructors) have that in copious quantities and that's why you want a fair shake from the company. So I don't believe we disagree.

C'est bien, la passion canadien-francaise. C'a me plait beaucoup! Ne le perd jamais!!!
post #106 of 141
Quote:
Originally posted by Seth:
Arcadie the whole world doesn't have the same school timetable as the US.

Our summer break for university goes from the end of November to the beginning of March.
Seth
I think I knew this. Most of our foreign instructors were european. Actually I went to a university here in the US that was on a "trimester" plan. The normal school year, for us, was divided into 3 terms plus an equal length summer term. The winter term corresponded roughly to your summer break. I suppose you could have been a full-time student there and still taught skiing during the winter. Probably other places have such a system so possibly some of these folks were here on that student visa. Others were obviously not, though. Rumor had it they would fly into Montreal, Canada and the SSD would drive up and bring them back. The border is pretty easy to cross here. The border stations are not even manned at night so I guess you could just enter illegally and work if your employer were amenable. There may be other ways around the law not as blatantly illegal. There certainly are quite a few aliens working and living illegally around this country. I think the business community prefers to have it that way. I enjoyed being able to meet and ski with people from elsewhere. My only regret is that quite a few of these folks were not very friendly. Possibly just the age differential or possibly just reinforces my suspicion of their questionable legal status. I think they were warned off.

I sure wish that we'd gotten some of those acredited Austrian instructors here, that would have been really interesting.
post #107 of 141
This discussion got a lot of people talking... wow. I will add my two cents.

I am a part-time ski instructor... I started doing it for fun and as a means to get better. During my 2nd season of teaching, I planned to do the PSIA level 1 certification and then a lot of things happened in my life which prevented me.

The following year, PSIA instituted "Fresh Tracks"... what this meant to me was that I would have to do some additional clinics and spend some additional money to get the certification for which I had already prepared. (I had the luxury of working at a mountain with 3 examiners on staff - so our clinics were STELLAR). I thought about the expense (the actual cost, plus the time away from my 9-5 job and determined that I would not pursue the certification.

In addition to the excellent on-hill clinics/training that I have received as an instructor, my profession is in training and development. I have more than 10 years experience in Adult Learning Theory, course developement, and delivery.

These days I teach a women's clinic - 8-12 week program, and do some group classes for adults and kids. I only teach a couple days a week. I hold no certifications from PSIA. It does not affect the attitude that learners have toward me. I have many private requests and do very well in tips. People I work with commonly assume I have my level 2 PSIA certification.

I have decided that if teaching skiing was my "career" - my full-time job, then I would have the certifications... because I'd seek career development and elevation. As a part-timer, I really am doing it for fun, the free lessons, etc.

Hope my opinion helps. [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #108 of 141
I did some more thinking and after giving my opinion about PSIA certs, and I decided to enter the discussion about PSIA and paying dues, etc.

PSIA, as I have always understood it, is a professional association dedicated to the development of it's members. PSIA holds all sorts of training/clinics, has a nice website, and produces all several periodicals for it's membership.

Why do people belong to professional associations? Generally it's to take advantage of the information sharing, the training and development, the conferences, and for networking purposes. Does PSIA fulfill all of that for you?

I belong to a few organizations: US Sailing, American Society of Training and Development, and the New England Human Resources Association. I do it because I want the credentials, they keep me current (knowledge, information), and for networking. None of these entities guarantee me work or specific rates.

I appreciate the concerns that people have, and being a ski instructor is definately a labor of love - because we all know it doesn't pay very well. And, a ski resport is a business. The idea is to make a profit. Two somewhat opposed perspectives.

IMHO - most resorts do have a ramped-up "reward" system - you get more pay for higher certifications and you get exponentially more pay for private and private "requests". Therefore, I maintain that the really great instructor/business person seizes the opportunity that presents itself: UPSELL... you want to make more money then you have to take charge of your revenue. Being a great instructor, having a friendly/warm personality, and explaining to people that they can "ask for you" for their next lesson are all ways to do this. And, *I think* that people tip for SERVICE - meaning you have to a little above and beyond.

I hope that I have not come across as preachy - just wanted to voice my opinon. thanks for listening! [img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #109 of 141
Quote:
Does the current SAM business model ensure that there will be enough Weems and Nolos to carry the industry forward? I think that is a huge question that goes begging for answers. How does the PSIA (or for that matter at home the APSI) figure in the long term future of SS
Oz, first, thank you for putting me in the same sentence with Weems, which I take as a great honor. The saving grace of ski instruction is also it's worst enemy: we love what we do so much that we are willing to give it away. If we won't, there is someone who will. The only way to get ahead is to be businesslike in your approach, learn your profession inside and out, build a clientele, and work your book. Otherwise you are a fungible commodity.

It's unfortunate, but I'm afraid that to SAM, ski instructors often come across as lazy, when really it's more that they are helpless at marketing themselves. How well are we selling the next lesson? How well do we make a cold call to a stranger on a chair lift ride?

I think the next best thing PSIA could do for its members and for SAM is to help them with professionalism, salesmanship, marketing and promotion--teach them how to fish, so they don't have to go hungry while they wait for someone to give them a class.

Then SAM gets more than a warm body in a snazzy coat, it gets me and my book.
post #110 of 141
Quote:
Originally posted by Vailrider:
I have recently been selected to represent the Rocky Mountain division of PSIA/AASI at the national level. I am wondering what the members, both current and past, think the National organizations role is/should be? For current members, why do you stay? For past members, what made you leave?
Thanks in advance.
vailrider-

congrats on your selection to represent RM at the national level. i don't check and/or post often to epic. however, you did ask and i'd like to offer my two cents on this topic.

i believe one of the roles of PSIA should be 'creative partnerships'.

principles are:
1)look for more than money - though financial support is usually critical, partners can provide much more than money. in-kind support, advocacy, and influence are all of value.
2) identify unusual suspects - a creative process to bring radically different groups on board can build strong constituencies and achieve results at a much more ambitious level.
3) find the mutual benefits for a win-win relationship - get the usual and unusual partners together to share mission, vision, and organization action plans; identify common areas of interest; define goals and benefits to be achieved; and outline responsiblities and performance standards.
4)collabolrate - means more than cooperation and compromise. collabolratation is the act of 'laboring together' so that the efforts is dynamic and synergistic.

creating partnerships generally takes more time and energy, but the results can be spectacular....
post #111 of 141
Quote:
Originally posted by man from Oz:
[QB
Nolo and Weems you are established dedicated professionals in the prime of your careers. Does the current SAM business model ensure that there will be enough Weems and Nolos to carry the industry forward? I think that is a huge question that goes begging for answers. How does the PSIA (or for that matter at home the APSI) figure in the long term future of SS …. mmmm not sure.[/QB]
Thanks Nolo! Me too.

Oz, we also have increased our part timers.

We do this to protect our local instructors so that during the down seasons in January, etc. they will still have the first opportunities for work. Furthermore, the number of J1's j2's that we get is miniscule, and they have to compete in the hiring interviews.

Mainly, in hiring, we have been the beneficiaries of the last few years downturn in the economy, where many really fine teachers have decided that they want to be part time instructors. Last season I interviewed a woman who had been a corporate trainer for a large company and captain of her college ski team. I immediately offered her my job, and she turned it down as she wanted to be a part timer and pursue other interests as well. My point is that just because someone is part time does not mean that they are lesser instructors. We have many full certs who are part time.

We still follow the letter and spirit of the immigration law in that we hire most full cert Americans (exceptions only being people that we feel will not be a good fit for us--as all companies can and should do).

However we really do need a certain number of fully certed pros, and we have not found enough of them here, so we pull them in from abroad. (and without guarantees for them!!!!)

I have huge pride in all of our instructors. They are fine people and well trained (because of their own motivation) and offer a wonderful product for our guests at the level that they teach.

I'm not sure that PSIA could or should be involved in this process. It's more up to the ethics and business realities of each company. We think we balance the customer and employee needs pretty well. We will continue to improve that.
post #112 of 141
Quote:
i believe one of the roles of PSIA should be 'creative partnerships'.
Redrocket has some very exciting ideas in his post. I'd love to hear more about them, RR.
post #113 of 141
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by nolo:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />i believe one of the roles of PSIA should be 'creative partnerships'.
Redrocket has some very exciting ideas in his post. I'd love to hear more about them, RR.</font>[/quote]Me too!
post #114 of 141
[quote]Originally posted by weems:
Quote:
Originally posted by man from Oz:
[QB

I have huge pride in all of our instructors. They are fine people and well trained (because of their own motivation) and offer a wonderful product for our guests at the level that they teach.

I'm not sure that PSIA could or should be involved in this process. It's more up to the ethics and business realities of each company. We think we balance the customer and employee needs pretty well. We will continue to improve that.
Weems, it seems that you are doing a good job at Aspen. I am not asking for a perfect world but one where people are at least trying. IT seems to happen more in CO. I guest, I really got burned at the only ski area I worked in the U.S. Maybe my experience is kind of isolated. It seems according to old timer that the situation at that area got progressively worse.

A word on the need of full cert. There might be some more full cert around if there were more clinics at a high level on weekends. PSIA west division would not offer a single clinic at level 2 or 3 last year on weekends. Also there was only one exam date for the level 3 which is not enough. It makes it hard to get prepared and give it a second shot if we miss something. Some people would just like to try their level 3 as it is a unique chance to really know where you're at. There should be more collaboration between the divisions as I could attend clinics and exams in other divisions if they are not in a schedule that I can attend in mine.
post #115 of 141
Sadly, Frenchie, your experience may not be isolated. Although, I'm kind of insular here in the Colo/Utah axis so I really don't know for sure.

But yeah, getting burned, when you're putting out so much is really hard.

And yeah, Redrocket...more!

[ October 02, 2003, 02:29 PM: Message edited by: weems ]
post #116 of 141
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by weems:

We still follow the letter and spirit of the immigration law in that we hire most full cert Americans (exceptions only being people that we feel will not be a good fit for us--as all companies can and should do).QB]
Weems, I have been told in the past that if you hire H2B instructors that you have to hire all PSIA level 3's which apply or you could be opening the resort up to lawsuits. It doesn't matter whether or not they are a "good fit". It only matters if they have the qualifications. Can you shed any light?

Also, I am wondering what other full time instructors think when you read or hear another instructor say that they don’t do it for the money. That they do it for the love of the sport and the free pass.
post #117 of 141
Well I have to say I am one of those full time instructors. I don't do it for the money. I work at a fantastic resort with great benefits and training.
I originally got into this on a whim, right after college before I got a "real" job. But once I started meeting people, was introduced into the certification process, "I am very goal oriented," and saw the personal growth potential, I was hooked.

It funny the first couple of years I had people tell me that I was a "lifer," I would dismiss this comment and laugh, not knowing that I actually would become fully commited to this sport.
I have now been teaching for four years, I am fully certified, have taught two years in Australia, and I am looking to make a difference in the snow sports industry. I absolutely love everything about teaching, especially seeing the expression on a kids or adults face when they "get" what you were 'showing, telling, teaching' them. I love the commradore and helpfullness shown not only in my ski school but as a whole the PSIA 'team.'

Now back to money,
Likealot of other full time ski professionals I do not make alot or 'enough'(what is enough?) money. The past four years I have always wondered what it would be like to work a full time "real" job and make $$$. This summer I decided to give it a try and I have learned many things. I am good at the indoor job, but IT does not make me excited to go to work. Though I could now afford to go to a fancy restaurant, I would perfere to eat spaghetti sitting on the floor with friends in employee housing.
So in conclusion, as a full time instructor, I am not working to MAKE money. I am an instructor because skiing and teaching is my passion. My goal in life is not to have a wad of money in the bank account but to be thrilled to go to work everyday. Instructing does that for me, so I will continue on instructing and encouraging others to enjoy skiing as much as I do.

LU
post #118 of 141
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by LU WHOO:
Well I have to say I am one of those full time instructors. I don't do it for the money. I work at a fantastic resort with great benefits and training.
Sorry Lu if I have affended you. That was not my intention. If I may ask though, how do you pay your rent? Do you have another job?
post #119 of 141
Vailrider, I'm sorry if in my attempt to express my enthusiasm for teaching and skiing portrade an "I'm offended" attitude, it was not meant. Not offended.

How do I pay my rent? I live in great employee housing with friends, this saves a heck of alot of money and I am single. During the season, I make more than enough money to live comfortably, but the main problem is in the off season. The past two seasons I worked in OZ but, as some of you know making OZ dollars does not pay for US bills, insurance, car payments etc....... so this summer I had to stay here in the States and am working a higher paying job, so I can go another couple of years in OZ. Regardless of my summer job the shoulder seasons especially in the spring are tough.
Now that I have decided that I am in this profession for at least the next 5 years, I am trying to figure out how I can make this life style a bit more permanent at least in cash flow.
But as I stated before, my passion is skiing and teaching. Success to me is not necessarily having a wad of money in the bank account (though it would be nice).
If there are any success story's of how other Bears have been able to make skiing there career I would love to hear them.

[img]smile.gif[/img]
LU
To succeed you have ot believe in something with such passion it becomes a reality.
post #120 of 141
Quote:
Originally posted by Vailrider:
[QB]Weems, I have been told in the past that if you hire H2B instructors that you have to hire all PSIA level 3's which apply or you could be opening the resort up to lawsuits. It doesn't matter whether or not they are a "good fit". It only matters if they have the qualifications. Can you shed any light?
QB]
Sorry, I've been out of this for awhile. In answer to your question, we do not have to hire all PSIA 3's without regard to quality. We have turned down some 3's because we feel they are not suitable to teach our students. However these are few and far between. We actively seek American 3's to fill the number of Level 3 positions we need, and will usually give these pros the benefit of the doubt, if we're not too sure of their suitability. (This is a weird thing, because it speaks to the lowest common denominator quality-wise. Nevertheless, this is clearly the spirit of the law and we follow it with care, with an eye toward providing employment for Americans.)

The other factor that sometimes intervenes is the timeliness of the application. Sometimes the Americans apply way too late, because we've filled positions--having to start the visa process quite early in order to ensure the correct size and quality of staff.

Having said all that, the serendipitous effect of having the foreign instructors is that they lift the whole level of our school. Most of them teach two seasons a year, and they're normally of a very high quality.

And lastly, many of our instructors have had enormous benefit in working abroad. If all the world schools remain open to that, AND if we continue to fulfill our legal and moral obligations relative to the hiring of suitable Americans first, then I believe it's a wonderful program for our guests.

[ October 08, 2003, 05:05 AM: Message edited by: weems ]
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