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PSIA Level 1

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hi, I need some informatin on the PSIA level 1 test. Am I eligible to take it if I have taken an IT course and have more than 50 hours of teaching under my belt? I know that I would need a letter from the ski school director varifying my hours. The problem is, I don't believe that anyone on the ski school, including the director is/was PSIA certified.

The thing is, the area was closed last season and is reopening. I've been asked to come back on staff andI would like to get my PSIA 1.

Also, how couldI find out where a PSIA level 1 exam will be given and when (in or near MA) if I am qualified to take it.

thanks,
Laurie
post #2 of 14
Just go to www.psia-e.org and look under events. The 2003-2004 forms and schedule are all there. I believe you just need you SS director's signature on the form. I don't think they need to be PSIA themselves.

The site should answer your questions. Just surf around it, and you'll find study guides etc... under education.

Read the exam study guide and you'll find the requisits involved. These days you have to take a first tracks and become registered before taking the actual Level 1 exam.

Good luck....
post #3 of 14
Give the folks in Albany a call. They are very friendly.
post #4 of 14
Here's a question for any who would know:

PSIA-E seems to encompass PA and East. Who covers Ohio? Can I as an instructor in PA, attend a first tracks or L1 cert in OH?

I ask because the only local FT event is held here the first week of January. Obviously not enough time for a part timer to get 25 hours under my belt. Driving 12+ hours to NE to take the tests and paying for lodging is not something I really want to do, nor do I want to wait until next season to become registered and the season after that to go for L1. 3 years to get an L1 cert? What's the point? There's not enough listings for Western PA events on the schedule.
post #5 of 14
Ohio is PSIA-C (central). You'll probably have to talk to E and C in order to coordinate something. There's links to both divisions at www.psia.org . If this works here's the shortcut http://psia.org/psia_2002/whos_who/w...t.asp?mode=who

Good luck, I don't really know the answer to your question.
post #6 of 14
Another place to check for everyone is with their ski school. some of our trainers did a great job of "training" as far as running clinics but in talking to some of the other candidates during one of the prep clinics, I found that few of the trainers or schools did a very good job of letting their instructors know how to get the paper work and scheduling done. You have to dig in and get the training and exams. Don't expect your SSD or trainer to just hand you all the info.

Keep calling your division people. get a good working relationship with them. The list of scheduled prep's and exam's are often way under reported. Don't know about other divisions but in PSIA-W, A local school may arrange to bring an examiner or trainer to their local school to do the prep/exam if there are 6-7 candidates. If you keep up with the division, they might be able to put you in contact with a school doing this near by. If your schedule allows it and your ski school director can work it, you might be able to take an exam at one of these events as well. Also talk to your fellow instructors. If there are several in your school that are interested, see if you can get together and ask the SSD to bring the clinic/exam to your mountain.

Many ski schools I understand now use the portfolio method which may not require attending "sanctioned" tests but rather that you keep a journal and work with a trainer through out the season. Upon completion of the requirements including some testing you are awarded your level 1. Also I beleive the "50 Hrs" is not a hard fast rule in all the areas. It's more of a guideline. If your SSD thinks you have what it takes in experience to take the test they will often sign off on you going to the exam.

Good luck, I found the journey a very worthwhile experience.
post #7 of 14
as far as cross division event's, All the websites I've looked at show that if arranged in advance, the divisions will allow for training to be done in other areas. Exam's might be a little harder because some of the requirements can be different. At the lvl 1 Level I would imagine it not too big of a deal but when you get to lvl2 and above it's probably best to stick within your division. You will be on "home snow" conditions and probably more likely to not encounter conditions you have not been able to prepare for. Doing linked wedge turns for instance is very different in dry packed powder and on hard pack. Especially when they do it somewhere very flat.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally posted by dchan:
as far as cross division event's, All the websites I've looked at show that if arranged in advance, the divisions will allow for training to be done in other areas. Exam's might be a little harder because some of the requirements can be different. At the lvl 1 Level I would imagine it not too big of a deal but when you get to lvl2 and above it's probably best to stick within your division. You will be on "home snow" conditions and probably more likely to not encounter conditions you have not been able to prepare for. Doing linked wedge turns for instance is very different in dry packed powder and on hard pack. Especially when they do it somewhere very flat.
Ohio, PA...it's all the same flat boilerplate, no worries [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #9 of 14
Doing linked wedge turns is difficult on packed powder and hardpack? What other conditions would you use linked wedge turns for? Most beginner terrain IS packed stuff.
post #10 of 14
Taylomatt,

Didn't you have your certifacation earlier? There are reinstatemwent events in January at Wintergreen, Va (Jan21-23) and Pico, VT (Jan 23-25) and another at Attitash, NH March 5-7. I'm not sure of the requirments but it seems to me that you should be able to get your L-1 with some local clinics and this 3 day event. Your previous experience should count. If you didn't get your certs before, perhaps you old SS director can verify your experience and enable you to do a frist tracks at7S December 13-14.
post #11 of 14
Rob,

No when I taught full-part at 7S (10 years ago) I was only registered (senior year of college, trying to graduate, earn money, no time or funds to travel to get certified...you know). I never bothered when teaching at Loveland because basically I was part time and was more into getting a career started for myself, it was simply something I didn't really have time for.

Now that things have calmed down I want to get that certification when I return. As far as I know, nobody at 7S now was even there when I taught previously. The director of the Sunbowl is long gone and ski school there has undergone some pretty major changes over the years. Hopefully something can be worked out to make it a bit easier. We'll see in the coming weeks.
post #12 of 14
I said different not difficult, But the wording should have been

Doing linked wedge turns for instance is very different in dry packed powder THAN on hard pack. Especially when they do it somewhere very flat.

I remember when I took my Level 2, Normally we do each demo 2 times for each examiner, however our examiner had us do them three times. One time was later in the afternoon on a hot spring day. We went somewhere with fairly flat spring snow and proceeded to do our linked turns, starting with wedge turns changing to beginning wedge Cristies to advanced wedge cristies and finally to open parallel turns. (3 to 4 turns of each) It was very hard to keep moving because the snow was very slow. (like a packed powder day) earlier that morning the snow was quite fast so it was a totally different experience. I suspect the examiner wanted to "verify" some of his impressions from an earlier run for one of the candidates. (of course he did not say which candidate) but I asked why we were doing them again and he just said "I need another look" With the more difficult conditions I suspect one of the candidates might have either gone from a pass to fail or fail to pass based on this third look.

If you practice all your work in CO or UT for instance, and then take the exam somewhere like PA or CA you may encounter totally different conditions. at level 1 it probably would not make much difference but anything above that...
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally posted by Taylormatt:
Rob,

No when I taught full-part at 7S (10 years ago) I was only registered (senior year of college, trying to graduate, earn money, no time or funds to travel to get certified...you know). I never bothered when teaching at Loveland because basically I was part time and was more into getting a career started for myself, it was simply something I didn't really have time for.

Taylormatt..... 10 years ago all we had was registered, associate, and full cert. I was registered 10 yrs ago too. When they changed the system I was automatically made an L1. The biggest joke for me is I tell all the new instructors.." I never took a Level 1 exam ", when they ask me for sage advice (I of course go on to encourage, and help them work on stuff. I don't know whether they would consider your old registration status or not in a reinstatement situation.
post #14 of 14
Eastern,

I suspect I'll get these Q's answered soon. SS meeting tonight and next weekend, hopefully I get answers and everything works out. It would be great if some of my past experience seeped through and counted this season.
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