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Movement Analysis - JC Killy vs modern technique. - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Killy is an exceptional athlete with uncommonly wonderful abilities to recover balance. In these scenes he's out having a bit of fun too. Were he somewhat less skilled, the upright stance jc-ski points to would be less successful. His peers mostly angulated at the waist a bit in similar circumstances.

Rebound was an important aspect to ski performance in the 1970s and 1980s. It allowed the seamlessness of his weight transfers from one foot to the other with the accompanying realignment in ski direction. In a couple of the powder sequences, you can see brief inside ski tip divergences, the result of outside ski dominance.

I imagine that were you to see Killy skiing today, you'd still find an excellent image to drool over.
post #32 of 47

Kneale Brownson - in europe, to some extent, there was a change in technique ruffly during the 90s. The former sequensial weight transfer you see in JK skiing that built on the step turn used in ski racing changed to a more free all mountain skiing friendly two footed stance where both legs moved simultaniously and formed a single platform insted of two independent ones. In sweden i was coached to do this early 90s while in austria 10y later. I think it had to do with sweden being somewhat of a pioneer in offpist skiing starting in the early 80s.

post #33 of 47

And now for a brief tangential digression...

 

INGEMAR.jpg

post #34 of 47

Copied these styles also. JK and Stenmark 2 of the best ever.

post #35 of 47

Stenmark won the not too serious competition. In pritty good shape... now back to JK....

post #36 of 47

In that spirit I found another Killy video from "Snow Job", and posted it in the "Best Ski Movie" thread, but for any who didn't catch it there and future searchers of Killy material who end up here...

 

post #37 of 47


 

Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

If you watch JCK's skis in the video, and not the whole wonderful image, you'll see the inside ski in virtually every turn is disengaged from the turn.  It's how "good" skiers used to keep their feet so close together--they minimally hoisted the inside ski to get it out of the way while they turned on the outside ski.

Most "good" skiers today are much more two-footed and have a resulting slight separation of the feet so they can actually roll both feet onto corresponding edge simultaneously and allow the equipment to help.

Killy was blessed with an athleticism few among his peers had, as well as having had a lifetime of focus on skiing.  The practice and the inate skills allowed him to take chances in the race course that others dared not take.  Much of his skiing is wonderful recovery.
 

 

Yes, many elegant recoveries.  I noticed his hands - they move a lot, up and down, forward and (!!) back.  Sometimes they are back level with his core.  Who cares?  Beautiful and inspired skiing.  

 

 

post #38 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

I noticed his hands - they move a lot, up and down, forward and (!!) back.  Sometimes they are back level with his core. 


Lito Tejada-Flores' "Breakthrough With Skis" books/videos from the early 90's map pretty much to the Killy skiing style as shown in the clip: One-footed, step onto new outside ski just prior to turn initiation, mix of steering and carving, etc.

 

One of Lito's mantras from that time was "Ski with your feet; balance with your hands". Seems like that at least might still be regarded as good advice.  ;-)

post #39 of 47
I remember watching some Lito video years ago and thinking that he liked to rotate his torso a lot. I didn't find it nearly as inspiring as watching Killy.
post #40 of 47

Watching the video I see a lot of today's technique.  Yes with improvement in equipment and skis side cut has made great strides. Skiers have also refined a lot of the movements JCK made in the late 60's. Skiers forget it is a copulation of the decades that skiing today has become. Skiers on expert terrain and moguls still ski with there feet together. Why? IMO It is so they can be quicker across the fall line.

post #41 of 47
Quote:
Skiers forget it is a copulation of the decades that skiing today has become.

One of the best Freudian slip malapropisms I've seen in a while!

wink.gif
post #42 of 47

and to think I have been missing this part of skiing my whole skiing life?  Darntongue.gif

post #43 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

Quote:
Skiers forget it is a copulation of the decades that skiing today has become.
One of the best Freudian slip malapropisms I've seen in a while!
wink.gif


In your mind. But perhaps the wording was chosen intentionally? I can easily read it that way. Guess we'll have to wait for the author to weigh in.

 

Funny how it does seem to be generally suggested when skiing powder, bumps and crud to keep the skis close, and work them together, lest they diverge and cause problems. That covers a lot of skiing, yet the idea of using that as a default style is pooh-pooh'd as so dead and outdated.

 

 

 

post #44 of 47

Hard to beat Stenmark and Tomba.

Stenmark's record of WC wins will stand for a long time.

 

post #45 of 47
But could they win in all three disciplines?
post #46 of 47

Came across a couple of gems today...

 

 

 

 

In this one Killy talks about making Snow Job - if you speak French or can read Italian you're in luck...

 


Edited by jc-ski - 11/17/13 at 6:16pm
post #47 of 47

Smooth skiing;-)

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