New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Aspen and Louise... Impressions.

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Just watched Lindsey Vonn ski the GS run I wonder if something happened to her edges, they were most certainly not "serrated" .. The snow looks boilerplate and glazing none of the girls are looking smooth so far...  If its making the best in the world look tense and slippery I can only imagine what its really like on there...

More as it develops :)
post #2 of 26
 This was strange race... at least first run, will see how will be second one. It looked like the more mistakes you make, the faster you are. Obviously Hoelzel made run for someone from outer space, even though her run looked everything but great for me. On the other side, Goergel for example had pretty clean run, but ended almost 5sec back... I mean 5sec??? I have no idea what this was, but time differences are extremely huge.
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Hammer run by Didier...

Tough luck for TJ Lanning... Nasty looking wipeout, hopefully its nothing too bad.

The snow at Louise looks hooky, hopefully we don't see more of this.
post #4 of 26
@louise:

From what I could see, most of the time differences were made in the waterfall. Sadly, it was extremely hard to judge that area on television with the limited amount of light. The entry line in that area was the most dominating aspect in this race imo.

Lanning looked horrible, hard to comprehend one of his ski's not coming off in a crash like that :( DIN-roulette is sad.
post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
The 2nd run in Aspen was a little less of a mess...

That track definitely humbled some of these girls.

Louise was also weird how some guys were money on top and as soon as they came around Waterfall.
post #6 of 26
I wish that the video player didn't suck so much. It's lagging so horridly that I don't even feel like watching anymore.
post #7 of 26
According to Vonn, she hit a rock early on during her run and "totally destroyed" the edge on one of her top GS skis.  She had described the piste as very slick during yesterday's interviews, and I can't imagine how even a top-level racer would get anything decent out of that track without perfect edges.  She was unlucky today - says it was the first time she can recall hitting a rock on a World Cup race course.

Hopefully she'll fare better in the slalom.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TMAS29 View Post

Just watched Lindsey Vonn ski the GS run I wonder if something happened to her edges, they were most certainly not "serrated" .
post #8 of 26
I think it's worth pointing out just how fast Cuche was throughout. Through the five timed sections he was 10th, 7th, 1st, 2nd and 2nd. Nobody else was even close to that consistent for the length of the course. Heel (2nd) was 43, 1, 3, 11, 21; Janka was 39, 6, 8, 4, 26. Not sure if Cuche caught the wind in the right spots (although doesn't seem like it, since the wind is much more of a factor up top), but that's some really impressive consistency.

Props to Canadian Louis-Pierre Helie for sneaking into the points (22nd) from bib 60. Weibrecht was even more impressive, finishing 12th with bib 62.

One other observation, you might have noticed Hans Olsson (brother of Jon) coming into the finish in a strange tuck, kinda like a ski jumper with his arms back and poles behind and up slightly. Apparently it's something he was playing with in training and got a good speed boost from - might have worked since he was 1st in the final section (his best out of the others was 14th).
post #9 of 26
Thread Starter 
Good day for Canada today.. Exept Kucera breaking his leg...

And just like to point out that Aspen was a mess today again... What's the big deal with injecting artificial snow anyways... were they budding the good stuff or something?
post #10 of 26

 Great day for the Canadians for sure - not just the men in Lake Louise, but a couple good results in Aspen with Goodman skiing solidly on a tough course, and Erin Mielzynski finishing in the points in her first WC start, from bib 60 (!), but Kucera's injury put a huge damper on it. Huge blow, and while I have no doubt he'll be back with a vengeance next season, no matter how much they downplay the Olympics, it's gotta be a huge disappointment to miss out on an Olympics on home turf when he was skiing so consistently well that he was a serious medal contender. Big vibes for a quick and easy recovery!

As for the s@#$show that was Aspen, SkiRacing.com's wrap up article notes that the injection has been handed down from upon high by FIS for all women's tech events this season. Presumably to ensure a more consistent and fair surface, combined with the early season man-made snow on a tough hill (and apparently the high altitude and low humidity) it made for an obviously brutal race. 1/3 of the racers didn't finish the first run, and that rate was actually slightly higher in the top 30.

There are definitely some good arguments in favour, but it seems like they've gone overboard in mandating it for every race, rather than making the call based on conditions. Similar to the mandatory heli-evac rule they have now - obviously past experience has shown that having a helicopter on stand-by is a good idea, but it doesn't seem to me that a heli-evac from the slope is necessarily the most efficient or fastest means in every case.
It looked like at LL they were hoisting off the hill, then landing in the parking lot to actually load them in the bird, then off to Banff - not to mention the time spent waiting for the heli, lowering the medic, prepping him for transport, etc. I can see why this would be a good idea in some locations in the Alps, but knowing that location on Lake Louise, I'm pretty confident they would have been faster taking him in a sled to the bottom and loading him directly into the heli.

post #11 of 26
Quote:
As for the s@#$show that was Aspen
 

AFAIK, racing in those conditions does nothing to help promote the sport.  It is sad to watch the best skiers in the world have to struggle for survival.
JF
post #12 of 26
I agree about Aspen, but then again, this season is pretty strange from beginning. I don't remember such time differences in previous seasons as they are this season. Fifth in Soelden was 1sec behind already, 10th almost 2. In Levi 4th was 1.33sec behind already and 10th almost 3sec. In Aspen GS 5th one 2.13 behind and in 27th more then 5sec, and in SL 5th one almost 2sec behind, with 30th 7.69sec. I mean almost 8sec????
Courses were same for everyone, as they were in previous seasons, but time differences are huge... much bigger then they were before. So we can't say it's about snow. Zahrobska in SL and Hoelzl or Zettel in GS still had to ski same course as everyone else, so we can't really blame course or injected snow for this kind of performance.
post #13 of 26
I guess I'm in the minority about Aspen: I think it was a top-notch challenge for the elite of women's skiing.  Those who could adapt to the conditions did well; those who couldn't paid the price.  Frankly, I think it's great to have a course that is an extreme challenge that isn't a DH or SG course.  The men have such courses in Adelboden (GS) and Schladming (SL), so why can't the women also have the same level of challenge?  These are elite athletes, and they should either put up or shut up.

I think that all of the complaints, both from racers and officials, are just a lot of grousing.  Sure, it's a bit monotonous to have every race be injected, and I think there's something to be said for allowing a variety of snow conditions back into the World Cup (I recall a picture of Stenmark skiing a World Cup SL in the 1970s where he was not only skiing in soft, rutted snow, but had to avoid bare patches, as well - now that is a test of skill!).  And Aspen did a great job with their course prep (save for the random stones that made their way onto the surface of the GS course), and their injection made for a remarkably consistent surface throughout the field (e.g. Anne-Sophie Barthet, skiing from a 58th-place 1st run start to a 6th place finish after both runs).

Sure, the war of attrition model isn't a great TV show (though it seems to work for shows like The Amazing Race and Survivor, doesn't it?), but it's compelling skiing: showing that, even at the elite level, skiers are not infallible.  To me, that's compelling, that's what draws me in and keeps me in: seeing how the world's best deal with adversity is part of the allure of World Cup skiing, and Aspen provided that allure in spades.

Just my $0.02 - YMMV.
post #14 of 26
 Ski races these days have the appearance of a darts match -- everyone is hitting 180's and no one is missing by much.  The top are all within a few hundreths of a second.  To me, that is boring -- can you imagine a race where everyone hits the line, no one falls, and the top 30 are 0.30 secs apart?  It would be like watching paint dry.
post #15 of 26

I think I have to agree, re course conditions.  I was at a Nor Am SL at Loveland this morning, with a lot of US Teamers, all of the Canadian techies, plus Mario Matt, Marcel Hirscher, Rainer Schoenfedler, and Marc Berthod, among the Euros.  I don't remember, one of top women, it might have been Hoelzl, said Aspen was no big deal because she had been training on similar stuff at Loveland...which was definitely glassy today.  The slippers didn't have to do much work today, and the course stayed pretty fair for the whole field (90 starters), and there were actually some decent runs from the end of the pack...and there were some people who struggled.  It obviously ain't easy, but super hard stuff like that will separate the best from the rest in terms of athletic ability, skiing skills, and tactics...

 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by songfta View Post

I guess I'm in the minority about Aspen: I think it was a top-notch challenge for the elite of women's skiing.  Those who could adapt to the conditions did well; those who couldn't paid the price.  Frankly, I think it's great to have a course that is an extreme challenge that isn't a DH or SG course.  The men have such courses in Adelboden (GS) and Schladming (SL), so why can't the women also have the same level of challenge?  These are elite athletes, and they should either put up or shut up.

I think that all of the complaints, both from racers and officials, are just a lot of grousing.  Sure, it's a bit monotonous to have every race be injected, and I think there's something to be said for allowing a variety of snow conditions back into the World Cup (I recall a picture of Stenmark skiing a World Cup SL in the 1970s where he was not only skiing in soft, rutted snow, but had to avoid bare patches, as well - now that is a test of skill!).  And Aspen did a great job with their course prep (save for the random stones that made their way onto the surface of the GS course), and their injection made for a remarkably consistent surface throughout the field (e.g. Anne-Sophie Barthet, skiing from a 58th-place 1st run start to a 6th place finish after both runs).

Sure, the war of attrition model isn't a great TV show (though it seems to work for shows like The Amazing Race and Survivor, doesn't it?), but it's compelling skiing: showing that, even at the elite level, skiers are not infallible.  To me, that's compelling, that's what draws me in and keeps me in: seeing how the world's best deal with adversity is part of the allure of World Cup skiing, and Aspen provided that allure in spades.

Just my $0.02 - YMMV.
 
post #16 of 26
I'm not a fan of racing on ice or watching racing on ice, I just don't think it's that compelling.  I'd like to see longer and/or steeper courses to create more distinction between racers rather than icier courses.

The funny thing is that back when I was actively racing, I had better results on ice.  Still hated it.
post #17 of 26
Read Greg Needell's latest blog at alpineraceconsulting.com   Brutally frank on this weekend. Tough weekend for the USST.  Great insight on injection.
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muleski View Post

Read Greg Needell's latest blog at alpineraceconsulting.com   Brutally frank on this weekend. Tough weekend for the USST.  Great insight on injection.

Great blog.
post #19 of 26
I love how all of the reports are silent on Miller's performance... is he finally getting what he wants from the media? No attention/talk?
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post

I love how all of the reports are silent on Miller's performance... is he finally getting what he wants from the media? No attention/talk?
 

He's a non-factor at the moment. Carlo Janka looks like the real deal, though.
post #21 of 26

I imagine that Bode's right on track, and perhaps a bit ahead of plan, based on when he rejoined the sport, and the USST. That's what I hear and read. Coming off last season with the ankle, having almost no on-snow prep periods this summer, etc., he needs time.  Most reports are positive, and suggest that he's getting dialed in as he works himself back into a WC fitness level. It will be interesting, and more telling to see how he's skiing at Bormio, and Wengen in another 4-6 weeks, I think. We shall see. He seems to be working at it, working to fit in as a teammate, and keeping a low profile. I have thought all along that this has to be geared at peaking for the Olympics. Still feel that way. It would be great to see him on the podium, and to see him reverse his diasterous PR episode from Torino. Plus, a great showing, and good image in Vancouver could be a big payday. Maybe not to the extent that it could be for LV, but still big!

Agree on Janka, and Cuche is just terrific. Swiss duo is killing it!


 

post #22 of 26
Yeah, if I were Bode, that's what I'd be doing. Looks like Svindal is doing the same. Which means the Cup overall is up for grabs.
post #23 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post

 Which means the Cup overall is up for grabs.

You mean... "Cuche is going to be all over that like a fat kid on candy"
post #24 of 26
Yup. But he's gotta be thinking Olympics too, no? Tough one for him, as he's never won the Cup or an Olympic gold. What's he do? At least if you're Bode or Svindal, you've got one half of the puzzle already -- and if you're Raich, you've got both.
post #25 of 26
post #26 of 26
To be honest, I don't consider skiing as one of sports, where you normally can win overall World Cup OR Olympic medal, but not both. If you are in good form, you can easily win both. So I don't think Cuche has problems deciding which one to go for.
With Bode and Axel things are different. They are currently out of shape (ok strong word, but you know what I mean), so overall WC is most likely out of question, so they can concentrate on only remaining goal. But if they will get into winning shape anytime soon, they will be going for WC victories without any consideration. For Bode things might be still a bit different, since with his summer preparation, it's most likely he won't be able to get through all season without burning out.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home