EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › What does wax do that the ptex base doesn't?
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What does wax do that the ptex base doesn't?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I'm pretty sold on this whole tuning deal, and I'm planning on ordering some tools in the next few days.  From what I've learned from this forum, proper edge care, base care, and waxing is a proven method for making skis faster, and I guess I buy the explanation that brushing the wax textures it to reduce surface-tension-drag.  My question is why wax is necessary at all.  Why don't the manufacturers make the base of the ski do what the wax is doing? 
post #2 of 16
Then what would we obsess about?

I think it's a conspiracy to sell more wax.  The skis are just a consumer.  Like SUV's and gas.
post #3 of 16

Aside from adding speed, the wax serves to protect your base from the forces of friction.

http://www.racewax.com/category/tuning_tips.quick_tuning_guide/

 

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muaddib View Post  My question is why wax is necessary at all.  Why don't the manufacturers make the base of the ski do what the wax is doing? 

Teflon bases are too soft and unrepairable; bases made out of wax wouldn't flex with and stay on  the ski; self-waxing systems built into the ski aren't quite ready for market yet; steel bases are slow except in very cold snow.
post #5 of 16
The only thing you got to think about here is WHY WAX your car??

Sure, clear coat paints made a huge improvement a few years back.... just like sintered and super dense molecular plastics have revolutionized skiing from the old wooden ski days...

Wax is like Fat, or a Water Repellant Molecule. It wears off because of its properly to slide well. Just as it is sliding over the snow, it is also moving on your base...

The chemical bonds of highdensity molecular plastic on the other hand dont move at all.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
So they don't have a material as slick as wax and strong enough to be a base.
post #7 of 16
for racing purposes, there are different structures (textures) that are employed for varying snow and temperatures as well as different waxes. just as one ski can't excel in all conditions, one base preparation wouldn't either.

from a recreational point of view, one ski, one base material, one structure and one wax will serve many people's needs fairly well. recreational skiers aren't worried about a few hundredths of a second in a run, racers are.

wax also augments the base. a waxed base will last longer than an unwaxed base.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muaddib View Post

So they don't have a material as slick as wax and strong and elastic enough to be a base.

You got it.     

Mind you, polyethylene comes wicked close to being all three; the slickness is the easiest to improve.
post #9 of 16
that product may exist, but it's just not cost effective to manufacture for the ski industry yet. 
And besides, waxing is time spent in the man cave
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the answers guys.  I just received my order from Racewax.  I got a block of all temp and warm temp hydrocarbon wax, one of their plexi-scrapers, their three brush kit, a coarse gummy stone and an arkansas stone to take out any burrs, and a wax iron.  I'm going to give it a shot this weekend.  I held off on getting any edge sharpening equipment, but taking a closer look at my edges, I might need to go that route also.  I'm going to try to build a basic ski vise using a wooden boot blank.  I'll let you guys know how it turns out. 
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the answers guys.  I just received my order from Racewax.  I got a block of all temp and warm temp hydrocarbon wax, one of their plexi-scrapers, their three brush kit, a coarse gummy stone and an arkansas stone to take out any burrs, and a wax iron.  I'm going to give it a shot this weekend.  I held off on getting any edge sharpening equipment, but taking a closer look at my edges, I might need to go that route also.  I'm going to try to build a basic ski vise using a wooden boot blank.  I'll let you guys know how it turns out. 
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the answers guys.  I just received my order from Racewax.  I got a block of all temp and warm temp hydrocarbon wax, one of their plexi-scrapers, their three brush kit, a coarse gummy stone and an arkansas stone to take out any burrs, and a wax iron.  I'm going to give it a shot this weekend.  I held off on getting any edge sharpening equipment, but taking a closer look at my edges, I might need to go that route also.  I'm going to try to build a basic ski vise using a wooden boot blank.  I'll let you guys know how it turns out. 
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the answers guys.  I just received my order from Racewax.  I got a block of all temp and warm temp hydrocarbon wax, one of their plexi-scrapers, their three brush kit, a coarse gummy stone and an arkansas stone to take out any burrs, and a wax iron.  I'm going to give it a shot this weekend.  I held off on getting any edge sharpening equipment, but taking a closer look at my edges, I might need to go that route also.  I'm going to try to build a basic ski vise using a wooden boot blank.  I'll let you guys know how it turns out. 
post #14 of 16
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hahaha, woah, I didn't mean to post that so many times.  It kept telling me that it wasn't able to post and to try again later, so 3 or 4 "laters" and that's what I get. 

RossiGuy: yeah, I was considering getting one of the vises sold by racewax, but I was thinking that I might give a diy a shot to save 80 bucks.
post #16 of 16
i have some simple clamps for the edges and made a wooden shoe which clamps on the bench.
Those curvy skies do not clamp on the sides as easy as the old staight skis.

but a workmate will go a long way......

You will want a edge sharpening setup... every burr is drag... Which version you want depends on your budget and likings.
A real sharp edge does not feel like it is sharp it feels smooth but cuts your hand on the slightest pressure.
there are enough kits out there it is all budget.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › What does wax do that the ptex base doesn't?