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My new addiction

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
   I thought this would be a good place to introduce myself.  I started skiing way back in high school (about 18 years ago) on some skis that were bought for me as a gift but, the boots made me miserable. i.e. feet always cold and constantly going numb.  I didn't enjoy it too much so, I stopped.  I then went on a ski trip with my boyfriend (now husband) with those same skis and wound up not really enjoying the numb/cold foot ordeal again.  But that's all I knew....I thought that was just the way it was.   Well, his friend had some used rental skis that were the perfect size for my height and weight (aka the new shaped skis) that he was going to let me try for the remainder of our ski trip. 
   That next day was amazing.  I could turn much easier (me being a new beginner and all) and I felt more "in control".  I had the best time I can remember skiing ever.   Well, I never looked back at those long straight skis again.  Whenever we went skiing I would rent skis and boots rather than be miserable.  I finally bought some of my own skis and boots last year that finally fit  ...what a difference a good fitting boot makes!!!  I have a new passion for skiing and hope to take some lessons this season (if it ever gets cold enough to snow in the Midwest)  I have never taken a lesson before and wish I would have but, you are never too old to learn.  One day I hope to ski some powder out West or try Telemark skiing.   I would love to learn Telemark......but hear Michigan is not ideal for that type of skiing

  Anyway, I just wanted to say "hi" to everyone,  and if you ever are in MI--- ski the Porkies!!!  they have some great burgers at the lodge too.
post #2 of 16
 Yes in Deed!
Quote:
  ...what a difference a good fitting boot makes!!!
Welcome to EpicSki Boyne Girl!

As you can see, you have some Michigan friends here on EpicSki.  
What is your home mountain?  You are boyne girl but you say ski the Porkies.......
I'm in Cadillac and ski Crystal for the most part but make it to Boyne and Nubs a few times a year.

Now......where's the snow!?
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
I live in SE MI so, I will probably end up taking lessons at Mt. Holly since it is the closest to me.  I love skiing Boyne Mtn.  and Boyne Highlands. Those are my favorites so far---hence my choice for a forum name.   I've been hiking and skiing (Nordic and Alpine) in the Porkies a handful of times and, loved it--awesome views of Lake Superior. If anyone who lives in MI ever gets a chance to go...check out their back-country cabins...they are inexpensive and it makes for a cool ski trip.   Only problem is it takes 16 hours to get there for us.  Never been to Crystal or Nub's...hoping to go as much as possible this season.  I would like to check out all that MI has to offer.
post #4 of 16
Welcome aboard boynegirl and welcome to the addiction!  You'll get plenty of fuel for that addiction here!   I too live in SE Mich.  I teach full-time at Alpine Valley Ski Area.  We have a decent discount on lift tickets on Tuesdays for Ladies Day!    I'd love to give you a lesson if you're interested!  Teaching somebody who's already hooked is always a BLAST! 
post #5 of 16
Another Michigan welcome for you boynegirl!  Hope to see you on the slopes!
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone!

Snow miser, I may just take you up on that lesson.  I see some Tues. sick days off work in my future
post #7 of 16
Welcome to Epic Boynegirl from another metro Detroiter. My son's high school team trains and races at Pine Knob so I spend the bulk of my time there but I would welcome the opportunity to make a few runs with you.

Karl
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by boynegirl View Post

Thanks everyone!

Snow miser, I may just take you up on that lesson.  I see some Tues. sick days off work in my future


When you decide to take those lessons, DO look up Snowmiser.

You can contact her in advance through the Private Message system here.
post #9 of 16
Welcome to Epic.   Glad you have caught the bug - it is a good Bug.
post #10 of 16
 I took my first lesson when I was twenty years out of high school.  You're doing fine.

About new boots:  I also bought new boots and I wish somebody had told me this, so I will tell you.  The foot pads that the boots come with that are under the liners are not very good, no matter how good the boot.  So after about 15 times on the slopes with the boots the pads will wear down and you will have to get new ones.  My boots are still what I consider new, yet when I pulled out the pads I was shocked at how worn out they were.  The worn out pads cause your heel to pop up and push your feet forward.  One day you'll feel your boots are way too small.  It's actually your foot popping up in the back and moving forward, crushing your toes, because the worn pad can't hold your heel down anymore.

The first sign to look for that this is happening:  A blister on your big toe.  I should have questioned myself why that was happening.  I just figured it was a fluke.  I didn't realize what was happening until two more days on the slopes and I could no longer wear the boots.  I was in pain.   Then a bootfitter pulled out the pads and showed me the problem, and for 35 dollars put new pads in.

Now my boots fit perfectly again.  But I'm still going to be mindful that when I get a blister on my toe that the pads probably need to be replaced again.  

Well, have fun on the slopes!
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCJIM View Post

 I took my first lesson when I was twenty years out of high school.  You're doing fine.

About new boots:  I also bought new boots and I wish somebody had told me this, so I will tell you.  The foot pads that the boots come with that are under the liners are not very good, no matter how good the boot.  So after about 15 times on the slopes with the boots the pads will wear down and you will have to get new ones.  My boots are still what I consider new, yet when I pulled out the pads I was shocked at how worn out they were.  The worn out pads cause your heel to pop up and push your feet forward.  One day you'll feel your boots are way too small.  It's actually your foot popping up in the back and moving forward, crushing your toes, because the worn pad can't hold your heel down anymore.

The first sign to look for that this is happening:  A blister on your big toe.  I should have questioned myself why that was happening.  I just figured it was a fluke.  I didn't realize what was happening until two more days on the slopes and I could no longer wear the boots.  I was in pain.   Then a bootfitter pulled out the pads and showed me the problem, and for 35 dollars put new pads in.

Now my boots fit perfectly again.  But I'm still going to be mindful that when I get a blister on my toe that the pads probably need to be replaced again.  

Well, have fun on the slopes!

 
Or you could have a good footbed made for about $100-$300 that will really solve the problem and increase snow sensitivity and pressure transfer.  I am very cheap and will not ski anymore without a good footbed.  It is worth the money and will help you ski better.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post



Or you could have a good footbed made for about $100-$300 that will really solve the problem and increase snow sensitivity and pressure transfer.  I am very cheap and will not ski anymore without a good footbed.  It is worth the money and will help you ski better.
 

I fully agree that this is the best answer to the problem.  As a ski instructor I consider new foot beds just part of the cost of new boots.  However, sometimes people can't or won't go the extra mile for this type of fix.  Also beginners might not think it is wise to spring for the extra bucks at the beginning.

So, the next best thing is a set of after market off the shelf foot beds.  Most boot fitters and stores that sell boots have them.  They cost between $20 and $50 for a pair.  (There's a ton of them, just look.)  While not as good as custom foot beds, they do help and might even be all that you need for now.  Buy a good well fitting pair.  Ditch the crappy standard foot beds.  Put the new ones in and see what happens.

Then remember, if these made your feet feel so much better and possibly improved your skiing experience, what will a full boot fitting with custom orthotics do for you?  You'd be surprised!  Check out the threads in the Boot Fitter section for some answers.
post #13 of 16
 Thanks for that info.  Kudos to you both!
post #14 of 16
Sweet, hooked on the good stuff.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post



Or you could have a good footbed made for about $100-$300 that will really solve the problem and increase snow sensitivity and pressure transfer.  I am very cheap and will not ski anymore without a good footbed.  It is worth the money and will help you ski better.
 

I can't agree with this enough. I was going to buy the trim to fit ones but after thinking about it and how goofy my feet are in running shoes and the like I opted for custom fit for $100. Worth every penny. Much more comfortable in my boots (no arch or instep pain), and my skiing has gotten leaps and bounds better since then. Probably the best $100 I've spent on gear.
post #16 of 16
Glad to hear that!
Quote:
Originally Posted by bnferguson View Post




I can't agree with this enough. I was going to buy the trim to fit ones but after thinking about it and how goofy my feet are in running shoes and the like I opted for custom fit for $100. Worth every penny. Much more comfortable in my boots (no arch or instep pain), and my skiing has gotten leaps and bounds better since then. Probably the best $100 I've spent on gear.
 
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