EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Help with ski purchase for the bumps!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Help with ski purchase for the bumps! - Page 2

post #31 of 56
PE might ski fine in the bumps as a versatile ski, but it is not a bump ski by any means.  I don't think the PE would be a good choice for what he is trying to accomplish.

And what he is trying to accomplish is a good thing.

Furthermore a softer somewhat shorter ski with side cut could be a good choice, depending on his present ability to turn.  Quick turns are a good skill for bump skiing.  It is true that side cut skis get hung up on the edges in the bumps, which is a drawback.  But if it's short and soft it will be less of a problem.  Finding a straight ski that is forgiving and quick turning might be difficult.

I'd like to hear more about Phil's comment re flat mount.
post #32 of 56
An old Rossi X / B1 and olf soft K2s like the Mod and the lava lamp looking things are really easy going in bumps. The PE is a good bump ski, but the others are easier to learn on. If you have a pair of old advanced / intermediate skis those work well too.
post #33 of 56
One thing I have found that makes a significant difference is find a ski with a tail under 100mm wide.
post #34 of 56
Hippak:

Most people think of a "bump ski" as what the pros use to ski zipper lines at high speed, which is something to aspire to, but not what you need at this point.  You need a ski that is forgiving (i.e. on the mellower side of the stiffness scale), especially in the tail.  Bumps continually try to push you in the back seat, and this it exaggerated by a ski with a stiff front section, and then quickly punished further by a stiff tail that accelerates you when you want it the least.  IMO you are looking for a ski with an even (front and back equal) medium soft flex, and a sidecut that is not very deep.  A wide tip is OK, but not a real wide tail, which will hang up at the end of the turn.

Good powder skis (soft and straighter sidecut) tend to make good bump skis, as long as they are not very wide.  I do not have specific model recommendations, but you want to start out oozing through the bumps, so look for considerably softer and a little straighter than the Mantra.  Mantras can be a pretty good bump ski, if you have the game to stay forward and continually drive them, but not something to learn on in the bumps.

IMO the key to skiing bumps is keeping your tips on the snow, and that'll be a lot easier if your skis are not constantly pushing you back and speeding you up every time you hit a bump.  Good luck, and keep those hands in front where you can see'm.
post #35 of 56
Thread Starter 

From my end i'm hoping to pick something up over the next 2 days.  I'm not really interested in buying a used ski and I do not have any other ski's other then the Mantras.  Its fairly hard to find old stock in Calgary so really my only choice is brand new.

 

So should I be looking for a twin tip park ski around 75-80mm width?  How can you tell how deep the sidecut is and what the flex of the ski is?  Is there specs for this? 

 

Thanks!
 

post #36 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by hippak View Post

So should I be looking for a twin tip park ski around 75-80mm width?  How can you tell how deep the sidecut is and what the flex of the ski is?  Is there specs for this? 

 

Thanks!
 


One way would be to hand flex the ski. Another way is to look for somethign that is marketed as ain intermediate / advanced ski. I would avoid skis with a tip / tail ratio that is close to 1. Alot of park skis have a more symetrical side cut for skiing switch. That is not what you want.
post #37 of 56
Thread Starter 

So a Symettrical Volkl Wedge would be out of the question?  

 

Is the dynastar superpipe too close to being symettrical to being functional? 


 

post #38 of 56

Just get something soft, skinny(80mm or less) , and with the tip wider than the tail, if the tail is less than 100mm perfect, about head high. It really doesn't matter if its a rental ski from the shop or what. Put a 2 or 3degree base bevel on it and mount the bindings flat.

post #39 of 56
See if you can pull some mid-90s straight skis out of a dumpster somewhere (literally or figuratively).
post #40 of 56
Thread Starter 
Just visited anyone ski shop. They recommended a rossignol s4. Any feedback on this choice?
post #41 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by hippak View Post

How can you tell how deep the sidecut is and what the flex of the ski is?  Is there specs for this? 

 

Thanks!
 


Just visit the various manufactures websites. They will have all the ski dimensions on there.

Something to help you look at possible skis to buy are to compare them to mogul specific skis.

Hart F-17 World Cup
99-66-89

Hart F-17 Classic
103-66-89

Volkl Wall mogul
106-67.5-92

Volkl Rebellion
89-63-78

K2 Mamba Mogul
97-65-82

IDone Mogul
95-61-85

Head mojo
89-60-80

Al's Ski Barn has a decent stock of Mogul skis to purchase.
http://www.untracked.com/c94-skis_ski_packages_mens_mogul_skis.html

As you can see most of these skis also have a waist around 14mm narrower than the 80 being recommended. Obviously when it comes to mogul skis the narrower the better. If you truely want a mogul ski to perform do not just find an old straight ski. Moguls for me have always been somewhere that having the right tool for the job was important.

You can get a mogul specific ski brand new for around $300 if you just spend a short amount of time searching on the net. Finding older model years in a mogul ski is not a bad thing at all. If you really want to ski moguls get a ski made for it.  A ski like the Volkl Wall or Hart F-17 classic will still be a decent carving ski with the wider tip. The recommendation to get a soft ski is good but you also want a soft springy ski. You want a ski that flexes easily but also springs back very quickly from that flexed position.
post #42 of 56
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the reply.  I'm not spefically looking for a Mogul ski.  I'm more looking for a forgiving twin tip ski that i'll be able to use to learn how to handle the bumps.   I dont really want to zipper line down the bumps, just learn to survive em.

 

post #43 of 56
Thread Starter 

I'm hoping to pickup a set of skis tomorrow.  Can anyone provide comments on either of these two skis? 

 

Dynastar Superpipe: 

112-78-102 mm
radius: 20m
length: 175


Rossignol S4 Park: 
116-84-109
radius: 19.7m
length: 174

The S4 seems like it has some flex to it.  I checked an online review of the Dynastar superpipe and they mentioned that it is stiff?  I was under the impression that park skis are usually not stiff? 

 

Any comments or other options?  Thanks guys!

post #44 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by hippak View Post

I'm hoping to pickup a set of skis tomorrow.  Can anyone provide comments on either of these two skis? 

 

Dynastar Superpipe: 

112-78-102 mm
radius: 20m
length: 175


Rossignol S4 Park: 
116-84-109
radius: 19.7m
length: 174

The S4 seems like it has some flex to it.  I checked an online review of the Dynastar superpipe and they mentioned that it is stiff?  I was under the impression that park skis are usually not stiff? 

 

Any comments or other options?  Thanks guys!


In moguls, as in supermodels, skinnier is better. I'd go with the Dynastar. As far as park skis being not stiff, that's a relative assumption. A park ski is never going to be as stiff as a carving ski or a race ski. But park skis range in stiffness just as any other ski. PE's are stiffer than 1080's, etc. But I'd rather have the narrower ski rather than worry about degrees of stiffness between park skis.
post #45 of 56
Thread Starter 

How would you rate the Rossignol Phantom SC 80 against these two other skis? 

 

http://www.sportinglife.ca/sportinglife/browse/productDetailWithPicker.jsp?productId=20151429&categoryId=cat120008

 

post #46 of 56
Titanium - not for the bumps.
post #47 of 56

Elan Bloodline the best way to take out moguls. Was the ski used by other, with their topsheet on it.

If you can't find it then, go for Fischer Watea 78.

post #48 of 56
No one hearts the new (non-green) Elan 777 for teh bumping?
post #49 of 56
not a bump ski  (Two sheete of titanium above and below woodcore )if you bang them. would work if you carve.
post #50 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by CR0SS View Post




Just visit the various manufactures websites. They will have all the ski dimensions on there.

Something to help you look at possible skis to buy are to compare them to mogul specific skis.

Hart F-17 World Cup
99-66-89

Hart F-17 Classic
103-66-89

Volkl Wall mogul
106-67.5-92

Volkl Rebellion
89-63-78

K2 Mamba Mogul
97-65-82

IDone Mogul
95-61-85

Head mojo
89-60-80

Al's Ski Barn has a decent stock of Mogul skis to purchase.
http://www.untracked.com/c94-skis_ski_packages_mens_mogul_skis.html

As you can see most of these skis also have a waist around 14mm narrower than the 80 being recommended. Obviously when it comes to mogul skis the narrower the better. If you truely want a mogul ski to perform do not just find an old straight ski. Moguls for me have always been somewhere that having the right tool for the job was important.

You can get a mogul specific ski brand new for around $300 if you just spend a short amount of time searching on the net. Finding older model years in a mogul ski is not a bad thing at all. If you really want to ski moguls get a ski made for it.  A ski like the Volkl Wall or Hart F-17 classic will still be a decent carving ski with the wider tip. The recommendation to get a soft ski is good but you also want a soft springy ski. You want a ski that flexes easily but also springs back very quickly from that flexed position.

 

Good info.  I have some older F-17s
Add this to your list

'07 K2 CaBrawler Mogul Ski
- Torsion Box Construction
- Triaxial Braided
- Fir Core

Dimensions: 92-66-82
Turn Radius: 23m @ 169cm

I have it in a 179--it is actually shorter than my 177 F-17s  They're pretty soft but hold remarkably well on hardpack.
post #51 of 56
Not so sure that these are the bump skis you want to learn on.
post #52 of 56
IF YOU WANT A SKI WITH SOME SHAPE  FISCHER WATEA 78
post #53 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by backroom View Post

not a bump ski  (Two sheete of titanium above and below woodcore )if you bang them. would work if you carve.

That sounds like you're referring to the old green 87mm waist ones, not the new 77mm waist ones.
post #54 of 56
yes the new one
Quote:
the 777 ALU has been designed for freeriders of intermediate ability looking to step into the big league. Lightweight and durable DualTi technology coupled with a laminated woodcore and aluminum topsheet combine to produce a more forgiving and versatile flex suited to all snow conditions and terrain.  A raised tail at the rear of the ski makes all the difference for when it just dumps from the heavens.

 

http://elanskis.com/pcc.asp#xpath=/products/product#xpathid=Freeride777#lang=usa
post #55 of 56
how was the lesson.

was it the hammer, or the carpenter that was the issue?

 

I boot fit for a bunch of the high end instructors in the area, and send you in the right direction for some instruction

PM me,  I might not check this thread

post #56 of 56
Thread Starter 
Hi Guys,

Just figured I'd give you an update on my progress.

 

Ended up purchasing a pair of Apache Raider 170s.

 

Tried them out today at lake louise.  What a difference compared to my Mantras!
 

I was able to get down bump runs where I could barely link two turns with my Mantras in one shot.

Also was able to catch most of the world cup races too which was a huge bonus!

mntlion:  I'd be interested in getting a few lessons.  I"ll send you over a PM now!


 

 

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Help with ski purchase for the bumps!