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Ski waxing - How to do it proper way. - Page 3

post #61 of 68

Okay, I got a prompt reply from a rep at Rossi.  I am afraid to copy it here as this is what it says at the bottom.

The information contained in this message is confidential and intended only for the use of the individual or entity named above, and may be privileged. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure, or distribution is prohibited.  If you are not the intended recipient, please reply to the sender immediately, stating that you have received the message in error, then please delete this e-mail. Thank you.

 

Anyway, she did not just give me an answer.  She kinda beat around the bush.  Saying that she has been doing email for four years for them and in all that time said I was the only one who ever asked the question of bases.  As for putting the info on their website, she said she would forward that on to the content managers etc.

 

After seeing all the good base info on their snowboards I'm sure they must have some sintered bases on some skis, but if they went the same as Dynastar (same factory) it would only be on their 'race" skis.

 

I sent back a reply and asked if she could just tell me about the bases on the Experience line.  I'll wait and see.

post #62 of 68
Typical help desk runaround you seem to get everywhere these days.
post #63 of 68

My faith in Rossi is restored.  They have not gone the way of Dynastar. 

Here is what I found out directly from them.

 

7 Series powder skis, all of the Experience skis and the upper end carving skis all are sintered base skis.

The E-98, E-88 & E-78 have the IS NCB 7510 sintered base

The E-76 & e-74 have ptex 1925 sintered base. 

post #64 of 68
Thanks for the info Jacques and emailing them. Thats really good to know
post #65 of 68
Maybe that info should be added to the Epic Guides for the skis in question?
post #66 of 68

You can tell whether a ski has a sintered or extruded base by just looking at them.  You do need a bit of an eye for it, but if you compare a unwaxed kids entry level ski, to an unwaxed adult, moderate to high performance ski, you will notice that the kids ski will have a deeper, darker, and shinier shade of black (extruded), than the adults more opaque appearance.  This is easier to see when the skis are used and unwaxed. As well, when ironing wax, it becomes evident what type of base you have.  

 

There are high-quality versions of extruded base material available to manufacturers, that are equally on par with sintered bases performance wise.  They were used in manufacturing a decade or more ago, but the stigma associated with extruded bases, (cheap, with no wax absorption), led the ski companies to only use extruded in entry level adult, and kids skis.

post #67 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chenzo View Post
 

You can tell whether a ski has a sintered or extruded base by just looking at them.  You do need a bit of an eye for it, but if you compare a unwaxed kids entry level ski, to an unwaxed adult, moderate to high performance ski, you will notice that the kids ski will have a deeper, darker, and shinier shade of black (extruded), than the adults more opaque appearance.  This is easier to see when the skis are used and unwaxed. As well, when ironing wax, it becomes evident what type of base you have.  

 

There are high-quality versions of extruded base material available to manufacturers, that are equally on par with sintered bases performance wise.  They were used in manufacturing a decade or more ago, but the stigma associated with extruded bases, (cheap, with no wax absorption), led the ski companies to only use extruded in entry level adult, and kids skis.


That is pretty much true.  It still can be hard to tell though when a ski has a stone ground pattern.  Thing is it's nice when shopping for a ski to know what you are buying.  Since I have been lied to before and found bad info on some sales sites as well, I stared going to the makers sites for info.  It is a sad state of affairs when a maker says nothing about what the base is.  the lady told me they did not even print the info on their own sheets.  She had to go to some wigs to get the info.  Also true that some extruded bases will take up some wax, it just seems to be so little that I say they don't at all.  You just can't compare a extruded to a good quality sintered.  Also who wants to find out after the purchase when waxing?  I don't like to waste a bunch of time and wax to try to make an extruded base take wax when it won't. Sintruded's, 50-50's call them what they want they still can't compare.  Makers use them because of cost for profit margin on cheep stuff.  Some even try to get sintered price for them!  Bla bla bla.

post #68 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by bm4731 View Post

Thanks for the info Jacques and emailing them. Thats really good to know


Thanks for getting me going on that one.  Like I said Dynastar & Rossi. come from the same company so when I asked before it was only the Dynastar answer that I got.  One thing I hate to do is put my foot in my mouth!  Ouch!   I have done my best to correct the prior post.  All that could have been avoided if the makers would just list the info instead of saying nothing.  When they don't say, to me that is a red flag.  Prep them up good and they will treat you good.  Wax often.  When in doubt about snow temps use harder wax.  All temp waxes are always harder, just not THE hardest.

Best to you bm4731.

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