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Skiing Solo: what do you like? - Page 3

post #61 of 95
I ski alone most of the time.  I would say I ski with someone less then 20% of the time.  I enjoy going at my own pace, picking my runs and meeting new people on the lift but I also like skiing with friends. 
post #62 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

....Frustrating has to do with the obligations of skiing with friends or spouses that aren't on the same page and having it be not OK to ditch them on a powder day.  I will ski with anyone and have a good time.  It's what I do five days a week.  I'll even do it on my "days off" if it's not a powder day.  I need to feel like it's my choice though.  BTW my wife is a fun, wonderful person who has skied her whole life and lived in Sun Valley for 16 years before meeting me.  She's starting to mellow on her new found JH tude after a few years.  

 

Spot on! 

Now I think we'd have a great couples ski at JH if I can convince Betsy to head up north...

post #63 of 95
Thread Starter 
I was reading one of the classic avalanche safety books, and that book about the ski dog, Merle. Both books make this point. They say (with clinical detachment) that group excitement over deep snow conditions can lead to a poor decision-making process.

(I laughed that the scientific analysis of the situation was so familiar to me. We're always excited on a powder day! I shouted out loud.)

Especially when, and this goes to my thoughts beyond the books, the group is experiencing excitement AND ego competition due to the fact that it is not established who the leaders are.
 
A group is very safe (in very deep snow) when it is organized and the ego is supressed in favor of respecting the conditions and the mountain.

Skiers commit hubris when they lose respect for nature (god to many skiers).

Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

 I have always enjoyed skiing solo.  I also like skiing with a group, but sometimes find it frustrating.  I really love teaching skiing and patrolling, but have adopted a professional mindset that a working day is about the needs of the guests and it's not the same as free skiing.  I was talking with some of my peers this weekend at our refresher and an interesting thing came up.  Several very good and experienced skiers stated that they are safer skiing solo than in a group.  The argument was that when skiing solo less risks are taken.  Group mentality is a known heuristic trap.  I agree to a point.  The hazard may be lowered through less risk taking, but the consequences are higher.  It comes down to risk management and personal comfort.  I have always felt that there is no day that I couldn't safely ski.  It's all about assessing risk and making decisions to manage that risk.  Having said that there have been days when I chose to not ski.
post #64 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I was reading one of the classic avalanche safety books, and that book about the ski dog, Merle. Both books make this point. They say (with clinical detachment) that group excitement over deep snow conditions can lead to a poor decision-making process.

(I laughed that the scientific analysis of the situation was so familiar to me. We're always excited on a powder day! I shouted out loud.)

Especially when, and this goes to my thoughts beyond the books, the group is experiencing excitement AND ego competition due to the fact that it is not established who the leaders are.
 
A group is very safe (in very deep snow) when it is organized and the ego is suppressed in favor of respecting the conditions and the mountain.

Skiers commit hubris when they lose respect for nature (god to many skiers).
 


 

Are you talking about "Merles' Door?".  Great book BTW, I know most of the places and some of the people in it.

My friends were saying that they will push the terrain envelope harder with a group, that might even be a well reasoned group decision, than they will do on a solo outing.  You can safely accept more hazard when in a group and keep the risk factor roughly equal because of the reduced consequences inherent in having people back you up.  Risk = Hazard x Consequences.
post #65 of 95
Thread Starter 
I bet that's it, sub-title, story of a free-thinking dog, or something like that.

cool that you are familiar with the characters; it is non-fiction. I blame it for all the skiers on my block with ill-trained dogs

yeah, their scientific analysis for what we call STOKE! struck me as funny

a group with it's collective head together is the best for deep conditions. agreed.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post




Are you talking about "Merles' Door?".  Great book BTW, I know most of the places and some of the people in it.

My friends were saying that they will push the terrain envelope harder with a group, that might even be a well reasoned group decision, than they will do on a solo outing.  You can safely accept more hazard when in a group and keep the risk factor roughly equal because of the reduced consequences inherent in having people back you up.  Risk = Hazard x Consequences.

 
post #66 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

...that group excitement over deep snow conditions can lead to a poor decision-making process.

A group is very safe (in very deep snow) when it is organized and the ego is supressed in favor of respecting the conditions and the mountain.

Skiers commit hubris when they lose respect for nature (god to many skiers).

 



 

While not originally a fan of group skiing I do remember Betsy and my first Let’s Go Colorado epic gathering years ago when being asked by this Uncle Louie fellow to circle around him while he gave out his group skiing rules and organization.  Of course I find myself wandering off in mind thinking: 1.) why are we wasting time yammering about group skiing rules out here in the opens of A-Basin 2.) was 'Uncle Louie' a relative of mine? and 3.) why don't these Epic people use their real names?

[While I’m still working on issues 2 & 3] I realized on the very first run how important those group skiing instructions were, often repeated throughout the day.  UL convinced me that a group ski can be fun if managed correctly…otherwise…ski away as though your life depends on it    

post #67 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post




While not originally a fan of group skiing I do remember Betsy and my first Let’s Go Colorado epic gathering years ago when being asked by this Uncle Louie fellow to circle around him while he gave out his group skiing rules and organization.  Of course I find myself wandering off in mind thinking: 1.) why are we wasting time yammering about group skiing rules out here in the opens of A-Basin 2.) was 'Uncle Louie' a relative of mine? and 3.) why don't these Epic people use their real names?

 

[While I’m still working on issues 2 & 3] I realized on the very first run how important those group skiing instructions were, often repeated throughout the day.  UL convinced me that a group ski can be fun if managed correctly…otherwise…ski away as though your life depends on it    

 


 

 

 


Ques 2 ---Maybe

Ques 3---the Lou part is a part of my real name....and I am an Uncle...close enough?

And despite my simple suggestions /"rules" like going to the other side of the slope to pass.......even then, some didn't get it.

I can clearly remember Betsy skiing up to me in the lift line at the Basin saying "The guy in the red jacket just ran over Steve" (Steve being ssh)

I will stop there....If you were there you know the rest of the story, and ALL of you here know the "guy in the red jacket" (it wasn't me btw)

Skiing in groups can be a blast, but safety (individual to individual) comes first.  I never had an issue with someone hucking something and/or endangering themselves....but landing on somebody would be a whole different deal.
post #68 of 95
I ski alone a lot less now that I'm with EPICSKI!
post #69 of 95
I enjoy skiing alone but rarely ski alone anymore.   Our little group varies between 2 and 8 skiers on any given day and we ski 80% off piste in the trees etc. Some of my habits have changed;  no more Ipod in the ears as wouldn't be able to here a partner in trouble or whatever.  We will do some waiting for each other on catch trails and traverses to make sure we all made it that far.  At times it is a little rough on my old body as I am the worst skier of the group.   Pro side is evern at 67 I am getting better and enjoying myself immensely.

This started b y my having to get away from the Ski School mentality and start enjoying myself again.   Mission Accomplished.
post #70 of 95
I'd say about 90% alone, though I've found a few more potential ski buddies this season. I prefer skiing on my own - being able to hit exactly the kind of runs and terrain I feel like, enjoying the peace and quiet on the chairlift, and of course getting to zip through the singles line at the lifts - but I also really enjoying skiing with people who are much better than me. It's a great way to pick up technique tips and push myself out of my comfort zone.
post #71 of 95
When my kids were younger I was forced into skiing alone, since my normal partner (my wife) would be in the lodge watching the kid(s).  To my surprise I found I really liked skiing alone as long as it was not 100% of the time.  

On powder day ( or the  1.5 hrs I would ski before my wife’s turn),   I found it nice to only be concerned with finding 1 good line of powder to ski versus 2-3 on each run.  It made it much easier to stay at a lift and hit all the tight lines versus moving around the mtn. 

It is also nice to ski at your own pace. 

All that said, it is definitely safer to ski with someone else.  I definitely have decided against doing things because I was solo.   But, there is a sense of freedom skiing solo, some might call it liberty other might call it dangerous.


Now , we are back skiing together most of the time.  But, I do occasionally sneak in a solo powder day.  A little freedom is good thing.
post #72 of 95
Uncle Louie, could you do a brief summary here of your group ski rules, or point me to another thread that contains them?  Sorry if this is a thread hijack.
post #73 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie View Post




Ques 2 ---Maybe

Ques 3---the Lou part is a part of my real name....and I am an Uncle...close enough?

And despite my simple suggestions /"rules" like going to the other side of the slope to pass.......even then, some didn't get it.

I can clearly remember Betsy skiing up to me in the lift line at the Basin saying "The guy in the red jacket just ran over Steve" (Steve being ssh)

I will stop there....If you were there you know the rest of the story, and ALL of you here know the "guy in the red jacket" (it wasn't me btw)

Skiing in groups can be a blast, but safety (individual to individual) comes first.  I never had an issue with someone hucking something and/or endangering themselves....but landing on somebody would be a whole different deal.
 

I think I have been hit by the guy in the red jacket as well. :( He is pretty much the biggest dick I have ever met skiing and a stalker. 
post #74 of 95
Thread Starter 
X2, I'd be interested, hijack or not.

I ski with a large group a lot, and one rule is: no overtaking. If you want to be up front, start the run up front. then everyone holds their places till next run. verrrrry imPORtant!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post

Uncle Louie, could you do a brief summary here of your group ski rules, or point me to another thread that contains them?  Sorry if this is a thread hijack.
post #75 of 95
I enjoy skiing alone. I particularly like to ski alone when it's snowing lightly. Sorta like stopping by a woods on a snowy evening. I do not like to ride the chair or eat alone. In fact one of the things I like about skiing alone is the opportunity to meet more people on chairs, bars and community tables at lunch.
I start almost every ski day alone because everyone else likes to sleep late or start very slowly. I buy all the tickets and meet them at the bottom of the designated lift about an hour after the lifts open.
I don't like to wait. It's not bad on the slopes but I find it frustrating to wait on one of the group to get up on time, find their gear, stop for warm-ups and potty breaks then do it all over again after lunch. When you have a group it's just difficult to get everyone moving at the same time. I enjoy the group on the hill and during lunch but it's also frustrating. UL, if you can get a group organized please write an instruction book - I'll buy it.
Most of my family does not really understand I enjoy skiing alone. They take it personally thinking I don't want to ski with them, which is not the case. All of us are adult, low level expert, skiers but I'm probably the only member who will consistently go out alone.
post #76 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




I think I have been hit by the guy in the red jacket as well. :( He is pretty much the biggest dick I have ever met skiing and a stalker. 


 

No Josh, different guy. 

The event I spoke of was just 2 guys skiing on a trail that was becomming narrow and suddenly found themselves right next to each other and made contact.  Easy terrain, both were arcing and they just hit.  No big deal really, but it could have been. 
post #77 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj 

Uncle Louie, could you do a brief summary here of your group ski rules, or point me to another thread that contains them?  Sorry if this is a thread hijack.

Sure.

The LGC series attracted a level of skiers from upper intermediate to those who could go nearly everywhere.  Groups were usually about the size of an average ski school class but sometimes hit as many as 14.  Being a good skier and ripping along is one thing, being next to a dozen doing the same thing is a whole 'nother issue.

I always stressed the following;

*Know and observe the Skiers Responsibility Code

*Passing-  Pass with care and if you plan on passing, pass on the other side of the trail from the skier you are overtaking and yell left/right  as needed

*Leave plenty of space between you and the rest of the group and more space between you and the public on the hill.  (keep in mind we were in CO where there is usually significant trail width.)

*Stopping- Stop away from the group and ski over when clear or stop below the group.

*Don't pass the guide (we had a leader usually for the Let's Go Colorado events) "Guides" if you will, were usually local instructors who put the rest of the group on the terrain and toured them around.  The don't pass here idea was so the terrain the guide had in mind wouldn't be skied by.

*Stay with a partner in the trees and stop to make sure all got out (when we went off-piste) (We adopted this one when a very good skiing female Bear got out of the trees quickly enough to make another run and find us.  Yes, there was lots of POW that day)

Just common sense stuff really.
post #78 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie View Post




No Josh, different guy. 

The event I spoke of was just 2 guys skiing on a trail that was becomming narrow and suddenly found themselves right next to each other and made contact.  Easy terrain, both were arcing and they just hit.  No big deal really, but it could have been. 
 

Hey, if you can't get around the gates, you shouldn't be in the course, right UL? 

Usually in these cases, someone was the gate, and someone was the racer.  No fault works for car insurance, but it's seldom the case on the mountain.  The only no fault there is granted to the gate. 

This coming from a guy, as I'm sure you will attest, is usually the racer. 
post #79 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post


Hey, if you can't get around the gates, you shouldn't be in the course, right UL? 

 

Yeah, this is where thinking outside of the box sometimes works.  I have found it much easier to go the other direction around the 1st gate than everyone else does.  It's quicker and easier and keeps me away from the rest of the pack.  But they keep announcing "dsq" over the loud speaker.  You race Rick.....what the heck is that ?
post #80 of 95
I usually ski alone.  I guess nobody likes me..

It's nice to be able to ski at my own pace, and not spend half the day waiting with cold feet, or trying to find lost sheep, or worrying about what happend to so and so.  It's nice to be able to break when you want, stop when you want, keep going when you want and not have to worry about inconveniencing others.

I enjoy skiing with others too.  It's nice to share the joy. 

When skiing with others, I have noticed a need for one rule (in addition to the skier's code).
I sometimes play follow the leader.  This is a fun game to play with two people.  When playing with three, it is very important that you designate the person who will be second, or you just might find the followers trying to occupy the same space.
post #81 of 95
Here's a thought. We should do an Epic gathering for the loners. Meet up start of each day, then go our separate ways. Meet up again for beers after skiing.
post #82 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post

Here's a thought. We should do an Epic gathering for the loners. Meet up start of each day, then go our separate ways. Meet up again for beers after skiing.
Finally!  An event that I can attend!   I'll even buy the first round!
post #83 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post

Here's a thought. We should do an Epic gathering for the loners.

Here is the unofficial UnGathering Roll Call;

Ghost
Prickly
SugarCube
post #84 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post

Here's a thought. We should do an Epic gathering for the loners. Meet up start of each day, then go our separate ways. Meet up again for beers after skiing.

No friends here (but my mom says I'm cool). Count me in.
post #85 of 95
Lone Peak at Big Sky? Solitude? Mt Bachelor?
post #86 of 95
Definitely not Loveland.
post #87 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie View Post




No Josh, different guy. 

The event I spoke of was just 2 guys skiing on a trail that was becomming narrow and suddenly found themselves right next to each other and made contact.  Easy terrain, both were arcing and they just hit.  No big deal really, but it could have been. 
Years ago....  The first year for the gondola I think....  Two snowboarders collided like this in Teewinot Gully and one of them was killed.  
post #88 of 95
 I'm always down for a non-gathering
post #89 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post

Lone Peak at Big Sky? Solitude? Mt Bachelor?

Solitude. Kinda says it all.
post #90 of 95
Thread Starter 

 

 

I'm back to skiing a lot of solo now that the skiing is epic again. I take the time to figure out an adventure, a perfect set of turns, an absolutely remarkable place to be, an experience that gives me an amazing thrill and incredible satisfaction. It's profound. It's  putting the ski experience of a lifetime into one run, and thinking....there, that's my best.

 

I don't have the energy to go for quantity of runs to have a great day. I focus on a few goals, given conditions, and then savor those runs all day. I told a friend that it took me 30 minutes to hike into a couloir over scree and ice. I said it reminded me of the mountain climbing tales I read up on. He said he could have made three runs in that time. I said that I couldn't have ripped three runs anyway, so I enjoy the hike and explore, discovering good snow that no one had the notion to hit.
 

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