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Fitting for Injuries

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Many moons ago I dislocated my and torsion fractured my left ankle.

This injury left me with severley limited forward flex - unable to flex knee past fore foot
I have tried many solutions including Head WC Foams, Alpina A2R SL fitted by Banff fitters and a pair of Salomon X-wave 10's that were fit in Ottawa. I have had good performance and comfort in my right boot but never my left. After wearing out my Head boots - 30-50 days/yr over 5 years -I decided to try a different route and fit my left foot first.
I purchased a pair of Dalbello Porton 10's, which have a higher volume but a softer flex and have had a pair of super feet corks made.
I would like to try the below on my left boot but there is not a high end boot fitter in Revelstoke for me to ask.

1- Drill out outside canting adj rivet and un-screw inside canting adj screw
    and remove cuff
2 - Remove plastic foot bed
3 - Trim 1cm decreasing to 0mm from rear of cuff to cant mounting location - this will allow
        a more upright stance in boot.
4 -
Grind Heel of foot bed down 1-2mm decreasing toward toe  achieving gas pedal effect
5 - Replace Plastic footbed and re-attach Cuff to lower shell using T-nut to replace rivet
6 - Drill and T-nut the cuff to lower shell - pins cuff in new position and increases rigidity of
       boot

7 - Heat and stretch back of lower boot to match new cuff angle
8- Remove heel from sole of boot, add 8mm lifter and re-attach heel.

9 - Mount a carve plate to front of cuff and add a Booster strap to tie it all together

Note: On right boot only the pinning of lower shell, carve plate and Booster strap would be added.
Am I nuts or does this modification make sense?

I ski soft snow, trees and fresh corduroy, I mainly ski blacks and the deeper the fluff, the steeper I will go.
 
post #2 of 10
Hi JauGarage,


     With a limited range of motion at the ankle you need to be in a boot that won't allow any flexion beyond your range.  Not a soft boot---as to the other modifications??---I can't see your feet form here. 
     Check out the boot fitters listed in the wiki at the top of "Ask the boot guy's"  Find someone versed in biomechanics involved in skiing and trust his knowledge.
post #3 of 10
 

Why do you want to drop the ramp angle of the boot board?  If you have limited or fuzed ankle I would not max out that range of motion by lowering the heel inside the boot.  You would want the 

"net forward lean" inside the boot to match your ankle range of motion so that you are about in the middle of that range.

I would not try to remove the sole of the boot and add your lift between the heel and boot rather I would simply add a lifter plate to the bottom of the heel and router the top of the lug.


Agree with Miketsc, you want a stiff flex on boot to protect your ankle from injury.

Quote:
1- Drill out outside canting adj rivet and un-screw inside canting adj screw
    and remove cuff
2 - Remove plastic foot bed  why?
3 - Trim 1cm decreasing to 0mm from rear of cuff to cant mounting location - this will allow
        a more upright stance in boot.  
4 -
 Grind Heel of foot bed down 1-2mm decreasing toward toe  achieving gas pedal effect why?  this will close the ankle joint
5 - Replace Plastic footbed and re-attach Cuff to lower shell using T-nut to replace rivet
6 - Drill and T-nut the cuff to lower shell - pins cuff in new position and increases rigidity of
       boot    
OK

7 - Heat and stretch back of lower boot to match new cuff angle if needed
8- Remove heel from sole of boot, add 8mm lifter and re-attach heel.  
better to add a lifter to bottom of sole and router lug to DIN specs.  8mm is alot!! maybe experiment with shims first to determine appropriate amount.  also depends on the delta angle created by the binding model you are using.
9 - Mount a carve plate to front of cuff and add a Booster strap to tie it all together OK
Personally, I would address your ankle ROM inside the boot first then worry about your knee postioning and tib/fib angle after addressing the ankle and address this by adjusting the delta angle with sole lifter plates.

good luck
post #4 of 10

the guys at top shelf in fernie might be able to help you?

or

Lou in calgary
or
I'm in banff.

When did you get someone to do this work last in banff.   Xwaves, and alpina have not been avail for a few years...  (Abom sports on banff ave?)

I can do all that work, except for the 8mm lifter (and that is a BIG lift)  even if your legs are out by 8mm, I would start with 3 or 5mm and see how that feels,  your body can correct for a lot

post #5 of 10
as others have said, work form the foot outwards...deal with the anle ROM then do the external work if required, making the boot cuff more upright and adding an internal heel lift will bring you to a more open poistion for the ankle, that may be all that is required...... stiff is probably the best way  but without seeing your feet none of us can comment as to what will work best

good luck
post #6 of 10
You say you have had good performance and fit from the right but not the left, but you don't describe what is lacking.  I would think comfort issues relative to your injury should typically not be a problem to deal with unless related to stretch in your achilles or perhaps other soft tissue due to their now relative inflexibility.

I agree with the other guys that from what you describe a stiffer boot is in order to protect your injury, but I don't necessarily agree about the gas pedaling.  Yes it stretches your injury and that may be a problem but it also makes your system more responsive so you may not need as much movement to ski. 

You also don't mention anything about binding delta and binding position which also may have an effect on your needs.

And finally to reiterate Mtnlion, there are three respected shops within only hours of Revelstoke.  I guarantee all three of us see people from further away than yo would be coming.

Lou
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
My Left Foot
The inside ankle and The forward flex is limited by two permanently mounted screws and the scar tissue\calcium deposits that are present. I routinely stretch my achilles tendon so as not to develop drop toe. I wear a Richie style brace and orthotic in my day to day shoes and Superfeet\Dr.Scholls combination in my gym and trail shoes. The joint is tight when it is cold but once warm it loosens  I have good power just limited travel, I often press into the cuff -not bounce- two or more times during a long turn to correct my line. I compensate with my right ski for my limitations on the left. 
  I have pain from the bone bruising on the inside ankle, arhtristis in the joint and soft tissue damage on the sides of my achilles. The outside of my ankle is mis-shapen (flat)but causes no discomfort. I have very low tolerance for direct pressure on the inside rear of my heel\ankle. this has lead to heel cup problems in the past(no Bananas for me). I tend to push off with the ball of my foot to raise my ankle out of the pocket and temporarily relieve the pressure which causes all sorts of problems.
If I can make my left foot happy I would even consider buyinf a more technical boot fitted for the right. Although performance is high on the list, comfort is paramount. I would rather ski lazy Blues all day with no pain, than Black trees for two runs and am crippled for half the day.
Of course if I could ski Black trees and Bowls all day with little pain, well thats why I am asking questions
post #8 of 10
Now I have a clearer picture.  Still of course can't make complete recommendations without seeing everything.

Most skiers I've seen with screws holding things together have little ability to tolerate direct pressure anywhere around the screws.  Typically fixing this is just a matter of good boot work (stretching and grinding in the ankle area).  Your need to readjust your turn by continually moving back into the tongue during a turn may be helped by binding position adjustments.

Agree that pushing off the ball of foot does cause problems in the heel and is a major cause of heel spurs in skiing athletes.  But it is possible to dramatically reduce pressure in the heel area by grinding.

Still at day's end I can't say what will work for you and whether your modifications will help without seeing you.  So as previously mentioned there are three shops within several hours drive that specialize in helping skiers in your situation.

Lou
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks Lou
I have taken this as far as I had hoped and everyone was helpful
Is there a shop that you or someone else can recommend on this side of the Columbia's
I am a ski bum with a ski van, I would rather put the $300 + into my feet than into gas and travel expensives
I would also like to avoid 6hr drive over the pass if I could (there is already snow up there)
post #10 of 10
No problem.  First let me say ;it shouldn't take you 6 hours to get here and Mtnlion is one hour closer.  Understand there may be lots of snow in the pass now and that's a good thing except for in a ski bum van.  I don't know how to help. 

The only person I know of anywhere on your side of things is Terry Makos and I don't know exactly where he relocated to when he left Canmore.  He is in the interior somewhere though. 

I feel for you.  I know there isn't much over in your area.  Hard to make a living catering to only several thousand people spread over same number of square kilometres.

Lou
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