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"Extreme" T-Bar

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I learned on rope tows. some were pretty long and traveled over  support wheels. once the guy ahead snapped the rope and it came off the pulley, tossing me sideways and the rope landing on me and pinning me down by the leg.

fast forward: europe in the 60s and long t-bars that involve terrain trails you ride up. a kid could get picked up and just touch his tips.

decent topic for stories ....
post #2 of 22
 Pico had the most extreme surface lift I have ever ridden. 
post #3 of 22
At Charlottes Pass in Australia they have a "High Speed" detachable POMA, you ski down a maze corridor when you get to the end you trip a wand exactly like a start gate. This releases a platter which then drops down to the cable. You don't stop moving through the entire process, trying to grab a platter from a standstill yanked me right out of my skiis.
post #4 of 22
Alpine Meadows in the late 60's and early 70's had a t-bar that routinely lifted me several feet in the air...spinning too! Fun. Guess the lawyers don't let stuff like that go on any more.

Funny thing is, back then if there was anything even resembling a jump they would gate it off and groom it to smithereens. Nowadays, they BUILD jumps. I like it better now.
post #5 of 22
What about the Va et Vient , the Poma lift, serving Roca Jack at Portillo. A four skier lift capable of reaching of a roller coaster speeds. Oh mi dios para no perderselo.
post #6 of 22
Taught at couple of places in the 60s early 70s where we took beginners from rope tows to pomas or t-bars.  Those first rides up were a real experience for the instructor and the students.

The poma had an exposed area that manufactured its own uphill jump.  We tried to send up an instructor and patrolman first to wedge away the 'jump'; sometimes that worked.  For the newbies it could be very exciting, in a non positive way. 

The t-bar was attached to a ratcheting line, so you had to try and pair up people of approximately the same height.  That was great unless the instructor had a kids class.  If you are a 6' instructor riding with a 4' student, it put the T behind your knees.  Try that ride for 800' vertical

They don't make lifts like that any more, hopefully.
post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

The t-bar was attached to a ratcheting line, so you had to try and pair up people of approximately the same height.  That was great unless the instructor had a kids class.  If you are a 6' instructor riding with a 4' student, it put the T behind your knees.  Try that ride for 800' vertical

They don't make lifts like that any more, hopefully.
The t-bar at Breck is like that not sure what you mean by ratcheting but if parents go up with their kids the kid is usually between their legs or with another kid. Other than having to be with some one the same height the t-bar at is pretty tame gets a little windy but nothing extreme
post #8 of 22
 Poma at the local ski hill was detachable with a guy in a shack that pulled a lever to send you up the hill. A couple of Pomas had broken springs so you would get lanched a few feet off the track. You just never knew when. A "J" bar in AK had a 10 foot elevated track up the middle of the run. Fall off-back of the line.
post #9 of 22
I once saw a 10 year old girl get hung by her scarf when it got wrapped around a rope tow and sucked in to the high puller at the top of the hill.  She was unconscious when the hauled her away

I remember my first T-Bar ride.  The first attempt to grab it it sliped out of my mittens and the spring popped it back arouind and whacked me in the head somehow.  Then when I was able to get the next one on my butt I rode about 15 feet when the spring extended and popped bac it got away from me.  I then hugged it with my arms all the way up the rest of the way.  The third time I figured it out, but I was pretty small and remember those dips where it pulled me ovv my veet briefly in spots.
post #10 of 22
Such beautiful childhood memories in this thread

In the 1960s I often rode a platter/poma surface lift at Blue Knob, PA that could potentially turn you into a career choirboy on those cold mornings when the pole springs were frozen in place. I can also remember taking repeat rides on a long t-bar on Spruce Peak at Stowe in 1971 during a frigid visit the family made there.

I rode a serious t-bar for the first time in decades on a trip to Austria in 2003, enjoying a nice conversation with a guy from Holland on that ride. Before and after the t-bar I rode a modern 8-pass gondola and a bubble top six pack express chair. Fun diversity of lifts in Europe.

More recently I had a cool retro moment joining my teenage son on his first ever t-bar ride in 2008 on the west face at Mont Sainte Anne, Quebec. It was a beauty and climbed about 1000' vertical. http://www.snowjournal.com/images/gallery_snowjournal/47f0294c15945.jpg

I've only heard about Roca Jack, that speedy surface lift is in a class by itself.

post #11 of 22
For those who didn't get this when I posted it in 'Name This Trail'...

How about the T-Bar at la Grave?

It is extreme in that the entire T-Bar lift forms a T itself. You ride up one section, ski down to another section that is perpendicular to the first and get back on to ride to the top of the glacier.
 
Half way up the first section you ride under this arrangement that sends the return line of the first section off to the right at 90 degrees where you pick it up later. Then the second section's return line comes back here to complete the first section return line.

post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nono View Post

What about the Va et Vient , the Poma lift, serving Roca Jack at Portillo. A four skier lift capable of reaching of a roller coaster speeds. Oh mi dios para no perderselo.

+1
post #13 of 22
There is T bar in Pra-Loup (France) which is a few Km long and turns corners, goes up and down gullies etc.  A few places the return bars are 80 feet up, and the only thing keeping you from being launched to the same level is one wobbly pulley holding the cable down.  When I rode it the trail next to the lift was an unskiable boulder field so if one fell off they'd have to ski the liftline back down.

We don't  have cool old lifts like that in the states.
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

 Pico had the most extreme surface lift I have ever ridden. 


The top of that (we're talking a few decades ago) was major vert!
post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 
reading this reminded me. when we kids rode a poma with a washboard, we would jump the bumps as hard as we could.and let the spring extend the air time. 

 remember those washboards on long surface lifts? gnarly!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post


.......The poma had an exposed area that manufactured its own uphill jump.  We tried to send up an instructor and patrolman first to wedge away the 'jump'; sometimes that worked.  For the newbies it could be very exciting, in a non positive way. 

......
They don't make lifts like that any more, hopefully.
post #16 of 22
I remember quite fondly the T bars as a kid skiing at Sunday River and Sugarloaf. Maine Winters freeze little bones and T-bar springs. We would often be catapulted into the air as the track fell away and the T bar arm failed to extend. You would desperately try to keep the tips of your skis in the tracks. Failing that, you would inevitabley be spun around, and set down into the track - pointing down hill. Great fun that. And all but lost, like the pig piles created when someone ahead of you on the rope tow crashed and burned. Like lemmings off to their doom.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowfan View Post

 Guess the lawyers don't let stuff like that go on any more.

 
I am a lawyer. We have been blamed for many things. But the demise of the rudimentary T bar, or the fun we had on them, can not one of them. I believe the culprit is.....progress. Or just plain good sense.
David
post #17 of 22
On my trip to Switzerland (Villars-Gryon, and over towards Diableres (sp?)) last year, I had the "pleasure" of riding several T-bar and Poma lifts for the first time in many years.

First time I'd ever seen a Poma with *turns*... that took a little getting used to.  One of the guys in our group wiped out pretty bad on one, slid back down an icy, steep part of the track...
post #18 of 22
At Val D'Isere, the 3000 Poma lift. That is scary IMO!
post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 

A T-Bar could run in high winds better than a chair, I'd think. You're generally more sheltered on the snow.

But that may be the list of advantages to the skier, over a chair, and still, skiing up the mountain is not too bad.

post #20 of 22
Riding a T-bar with a newby is always a pain. First-timers always sit on the bar. Always. Even after explaining, lecturing, berating them, they sit on the bar. One companion sat on the bar after a ten-minute lecture and explanation of the consequences of sitting on the bar. He went down, I bailed out and then turned and said to him, "I told you not to sit on the bar!" With a straight face and absolute sincerity, he said, "How did you know?"
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I learned on rope tows. some were pretty long and traveled over  support wheels. once the guy ahead snapped the rope and it came off the pulley, tossing me sideways and the rope landing on me and pinning me down by the leg.

fast forward: europe in the 60s and long t-bars that involve terrain trails you ride up. a kid could get picked up and just touch his tips.

decent topic for stories ....


It happened to me more than once on "normal" ski lifts, I remember the place even. It was at a quaint little resort called "San Simone" where we used to go with our club.
post #22 of 22
Troll ski resort in Quesnel BC supposedly has the longest T-bar in North America.

http://www.trollskiresort.com/lifts.html
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