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suggest warm ski boot?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I'm way overdue for new ski boots.  One thing I'll look for is warmth -I have a problem with my toes getting cold/numb.  I use the $2-3 stick-on charcoal heaters under my toes and they help, but if there's a brand or model of boot that's considered more warm and toasty than others I'd like to know about it.  Not sure I want to get into the electric heaters -do they work?
thanks for any info-
post #2 of 28
Intuition liners.
post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your reply-
Intuition website price for alpine ski boot liners: $160.  That's the same price I've seen boot heaters listed at.  Intuition liners are apparently sold at ski shops and custom fitted?  Are they really that much better than "stock" liners or buying heaters, and do they last? I hoped a specific boot model or mfr would be suggested as being "warmest", as I'd prefer not to drop $300-400 on new boots then spend another $160 for heaters or to pull the liners and replace them.  Looking for best option with a budget in mind.  Can stay with the stick-on charcoal toe warmers if no better option.
          
post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by aDOOrondack View Post

Thanks for your reply-
  Intuition liners are apparently sold at ski shops and custom fitted?  Are they really that much better than "stock" liners
 

"Better" is debatable, mostly by racers.     "Warmer", sometimes "much warmer" is almost invariably the case.
 
  I hoped a specific boot model or mfr would be suggested as being "warmest", as I'd prefer not to drop $300-400 on new boots then spend another $160 for heaters or to pull the liners and replace them. 
 

About the best we can do here is tell you which boots are -cold-  or have suspect seals so you can avoid them.


Looking for best option with a budget in mind.  Can stay with the stick-on charcoal toe warmers if no better option.

     Best budget option: boot that fits + boot glove + never put feet in already-cold boots.
post #5 of 28

If warmth is a primary concern for a new boot, then consider the Dalbello Krypton Cross with the silver Intuition thermal fit liner. This is the warmest ski boot I have owned and also the best fitting. BUT - you need to consider the type of conditions / skiing you are targeting: salomon gates, bumps, etc. How a specific boot matches to your foot is also importent. The Cross works well for me providing warmth, outstanding heel hold, moderate flex making them bump friendly while being torsionally stiff for quick edge transfers. The Krypto Pro is a stiffer flexing version also available with an Intution liner. If a Delbello with Intuition liner works with your foot, you will be definately happy with the warmth. On Vermont "extreme - below 0" days I add  neoprene boot gloves which are definitely worth the few $ of cost. I do not know if Intuition liners fitted into other boots would provide the same warmth as they do in the Dalbello Krypton series.

Good luck with your search.

 

Falcon_O aka Charlie
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by aDOOrondack View Post

I'm way overdue for new ski boots.  One thing I'll look for is warmth -I have a problem with my toes getting cold/numb.  I use the $2-3 stick-on charcoal heaters under my toes and they help, but if there's a brand or model of boot that's considered more warm and toasty than others I'd like to know about it.  Not sure I want to get into the electric heaters -do they work?
thanks for any info-
 
post #6 of 28
i'd concur with Boot Gloves.  Wife always used toe warmers in her budget boots.  Bought her a set of boot gloves which also came with the self adhesive foil tape (much like air duct foil tape but with holes presumable to let vapor out) which one cut out and sticks to the outside of the liner.

She hasn't used a toe warmer since but has the option by keeping set in pocket.

some boots (Dalbello i know) were pre-wired as to allow one to just buy the pack later.

or course, if paying $2-$3 a pack for toe warmers, the payback on a 'better' boot could be quick, maybe there's a fine gov't rebate on energy star efficient boots!
post #7 of 28
 I used to have problems with cold feet.  A few major points.  

1.  Do your boots fit?  If you have to clamp them down too tight you will lose blood flow and your feet will be cold. 
2.  Are you starting with warm, dry boots and thin socks.  If I ever have to put my foot in a cold ski boot, I can never catch up and my foot is always cold.

Assuming these two points...  If your foot is still cold.

1.  Boot-glove  sure it looks dorky, but I use it and I know lots of great skiers who use it.  Advantage... Cheap and effective.  Disadvantage...  No easy access to boot buckles

2.  Chemical Pack  I don't like these in my ski boots.  Can be good for hands.  Advantage... Cheap and available.  Disadvantage...  A pain in the boot!

3.  Foot-beds  I think everyone should have these for lots of reasons.  

4.  Intuition Liner  I use one and love it.  Would like one in every ski boot.  Better control, much lighter, and much warmer than stock liner.  Advantage...  Great liner!  Disadvantage...  Expensive and IMO must be heated and formed by a pro.  This pro will charge you enough that it is probably better to by the liner from the shop that will mold it.

5.  Boot Heaters  I use Hotronics, Thermic is also good.  Unit must be installed correctly.  This is easy but pay attention as I had a skilled bootfitter screw one up for me.  Also don't cook your foot.  If it feels like there's a heater in your boot, it is set too high.  Your foot will sweat and you will be moving backwards.  Usually on my M4 the lowest setting is plenty.  Advantage...  Works very well when installed properly.  Additional elements are relatively cheap, install in multiple boots and share batteries and charger.  Disadvantage...  Expensive.  Can be difficult to find good battery mount on some boots.  I use clip to outside edge of power-strap and tuck into gaiter.

I hope this helps.  Cold feet suck!  
post #8 of 28
Tetonpwdrjunkie hit it.  If your boots fit you properly, nearly all boots are reasonably warm.  There's plenty of insulation in virtually all boots. The problem usually arises when there are tight spots (perhaps the buckles tightened too much to compensate for boots that are actually too big, for instance).  This will cut off circulation and make your feet cold.  I have low blood pressure and a tendency for my feet and hands to get cold easily.  A few years ago, I was properly fitted into a pair of Fischer plug race boots with very little insulation.  No problems.  On days when the temp would drop below -20 degrees, I'd put on a pair of Boot Gloves.  Find a good boot fitter and you'll have very few problems.  Good luck!
post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 
I wasn't aware of the boot glove option -at $30 that might be the way to go.  I didn't see mention of self-adhesive foil tape in what I saw listed online.  Is there a certain brand that works best that I should look for?
post #10 of 28

The brand is Bootgloves.  In my experience, the foil makes little difference; it's the neoprene covering that helps.

post #11 of 28
 Being warm in a ski boot entails a few different steps. First is getting a snug fit that does not cut off your circulation. This usually involves a custom footbed to control motion. This really helps because you don't have to overbuckle the boot to hold the foot in place. A custom liner also improves the fit but is not always necessary.Intuition is considered the warmest liner but I think you get a much better fit with the Zip-Fit liner. Before a footwarmer is installed you should consider a boot dryer that will dry and also pre-warm your liner so you are not putting on a cold (room temp) boot. A damp boot transfers the cold much more quickly than a dry one and a boot warmed to body temp gives you a huge head start on warmth. (room temp-68,  body temp-98.6)  The sock is also important, use a thin or mid weight sock that is made for skiing.  If at this point you still have cld feet you need extra help. Thats where a battery powered footwarmer can be beneficial. 
post #12 of 28
If you want boot gloves I've got a few pairs to sell, with light (1x) to nonexistent usage.  I think I have one large (size 10-13) and two medium (5 - 9).  I got them a year or two ago and ended up using my pair once or twice (one of the mediums) and my kids never bothered with theirs (the other medium and the large).  New retail is $30 + shipping (e.g., http://www.rei.com/product/679011) -- make a reasonable offer and any or all of these could be yours.

In my experience boot gloves do what they're supposed to do.  I used these on alpine boots on bitterly cold days at Whiteface (i.e. -10 or colder and windy) and they worked as expected; took the edge off.  BUT these boots fit fine in the first place and were not cold under normal conditions. 

On the other hand my tele boots have molded intuition liners and tele boot + intuition is warmer than alpine boot with boot glove.  If you're getting new boots anyway, I'd go for the Kryptons, or just get any boot with a decent shell fit and get the Intuitions.  If you do it yourself it's a little scary the first time you mold them, but really not that hard, lots of good "how to" info on TGR and telemarktips.com.  Or get 'em baked at a ski shop, I don't know where you're located upstate but if you can get up to Lake Placid, they do a good job at High Peaks Cyclery.
post #13 of 28
all boots are about the same for warmth.

so get boots that fit her well, and then add stuff as needed   (what the others have said)
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01 View Post

If you want boot gloves I've got a few pairs to sell, with light (1x) to nonexistent usage.  I think I have one large (size 10-13) and two medium (5 - 9).  I got them a year or two ago and ended up using my pair once or twice (one of the mediums) and my kids never bothered with theirs (the other medium and the large).  New retail is $30 + shipping (e.g., http://www.rei.com/product/679011) -- make a reasonable offer and any or all of these could be yours.

In my experience boot gloves do what they're supposed to do.  I used these on alpine boots on bitterly cold days at Whiteface (i.e. -10 or colder and windy) and they worked as expected; took the edge off.  BUT these boots fit fine in the first place and were not cold under normal conditions. 

On the other hand my tele boots have molded intuition liners and tele boot + intuition is warmer than alpine boot with boot glove.  If you're getting new boots anyway, I'd go for the Kryptons, or just get any boot with a decent shell fit and get the Intuitions.  If you do it yourself it's a little scary the first time you mold them, but really not that hard, lots of good "how to" info on TGR and telemarktips.com.  Or get 'em baked at a ski shop, I don't know where you're located upstate but if you can get up to Lake Placid, they do a good job at High Peaks Cyclery.

I think your the guy that bought my old blue Garmont tele boots.  Are you still using them?  Or is this another pair?
post #15 of 28
mntlion, you are 100%, don't purchase the brand, purchase the boot that fits you best for your ability.  Go out and buy the boots recommended and if they don't fit right they will be colder then anything you currently have. 

Best advice I know, FIND A GOOD BOOT-FITTER.  The good ones are hard to find but you'll know the difference right away.  If the boots fit well, they will be warm.
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post




I think your the guy that bought my old blue Garmont tele boots.  Are you still using them?  Or is this another pair?
 

Yup, that's me.  

And true confession - I'm wearing them right now, at the dining room table.  (Only on EpicSki could I even hope that's not taken as really really weird.)  I re-molded the Intuitions last weekend and am comparing the fit with a newer pair that I just picked up.  Probably will keep both, but wanted to try a bigger boot (Ener-G's)  and the pinholes are shredded on the old blue ones.  Hardly need excuses to pick up more gear but as the first adopters go to NTN, I'm happy to tinker with their 75mm leftovers. 

End of thread-jack.  Thanks for the deal on the Garmonts, they've served me well.
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01 View Post




Yup, that's me.  

And true confession - I'm wearing them right now, at the dining room table.  (Only on EpicSki could I even hope that's not taken as really really weird.)  I re-molded the Intuitions last weekend and am comparing the fit with a newer pair that I just picked up.  Probably will keep both, but wanted to try a bigger boot (Ener-G's)  and the pinholes are shredded on the old blue ones.  Hardly need excuses to pick up more gear but as the first adopters go to NTN, I'm happy to tinker with their 75mm leftovers. 

End of thread-jack.  Thanks for the deal on the Garmonts, they've served me well.
 

Thats funny, because I'm wearing ski boots, Garmont Endorphines, right now.  I bought those blue Garas new and never used a binding with pins.  They had a lot of miles when I sold them to you though.  I also upgraded to an Ener-G which I am still using.  I'm not convinced about NTN, mostly because I have never seen anyone using a pair.  If they were good I would be seeing them here. 

End of thread jack
post #18 of 28
 many race boots are not as warm as recreational boots. that is two boots that are not equal in insulation, and the race boot would seem to many skiers to have inadequate insulation.

What temperature would you think of using bootwarmers? normal resort skiing and standing in moderate lines.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike_m View Post

....... If your boots fit you properly, nearly all boots are reasonably warm.  There's plenty of insulation in virtually all boots. ........
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post




Thats funny, because I'm wearing ski boots, Garmont Endorphines, right now.  ...

End of thread jack

THE DARK SIDE???

End of thread jack of thread jack.
post #20 of 28
aDOOrondack

Lots of good info above.  For the most for your money, I think these three steps are the way to go.

(1)  Buy the boots that fit you the best and best suit your skiing ability.  They'll all be about the same warmth.  Only high performance boots have thin liners that can be colder (like my Nordica Dobermans).  As well said above, blood circulation brings warmth to toes and fingers.  Proper fitting boots allow for good blood circulation.
(2)  Buy the neoprene boot covers.  Boot Gloves are one brand, and there is at least one other brand.  All seem to be about equal.  Use the chemical warmers on the coldest days.
(3)  If needed, buy Hotronics heated insoles.  Have fun.  I'd only try the custom liners if you get a 100% money back guarantee with them.
post #21 of 28
What SSG said.

I would add that boots that are too warm will make your feet cold.  I have intuition liners (Gold ID) and even on the coldest days my feet will sweat in them.  That in turn makes my feet very cold.  I have to change my socks constantly when it is "bone chillin' cold".

Ken
post #22 of 28

my read all depends on your spend.  Ideally, the best solution would be a good fitting boot what gives the toes some wiggle and not clamping off the blood flow. 

I'll admit i'm cheap and will likely upgrade and spend the money on a good boot fitter (but not for warmth, my feet run hot) for comfort, overall given what one spends for warmers, you can offset on comfy boots without warmers.  a prewired boot for the hotronics type warmer doesn't add much cost but i haven't checked in 2 yrs to see if many boots offer it, but it is not a very formed base.  comfort (blood flow) i suspect is the ideal solution.  I'd rather spend the extra cash on fit, boot fitter.

the boot glove used for my wife did have the foil, while i agree the neoprene outer glove is the biggest benefit, theory holds foil will reflect heat back ... hey, the fancy survival blankets use it, HD insulation with it adds an R .5 to 1 .. not much but sometimes a tipping point.  Christmas is coming, well placed hints may get you a free pair.

My tipping point is your comfort level, given how long one may use a boot, upgrade with a good fitter over time a low cost option, but if you can't swing the cash, or for the minimal extra cost, the boot glove is sure cheap and one needn't use it when it's warmer.  my wife uses it primarily when powder is abound to pile and ride the boot.

anyhow, just my opinion.

post #23 of 28
another vote for the hotronic M4. they work extremely well, recharge quickly and last for a solid  6 hours even on the 3rd level. Not that you need to run them at 3.
post #24 of 28
Clip the Hotronics to the top front of your boot strap, NOT the sides or back. They don't get banged up by crashes, the chair or anything else. You may need an extra long cord to attach them as boot shops usually run the cord up the back or sides of the boot, but TOTALLY worth it......Shops may not want to put them there because they USUALLY place it on the sides..........but insist and they will offer a longer cord, otherwise you will be fiddling and/or banging your investment on the chair when you sit, against rocks or hard snow when you wipe out, as these units aren't cheap...........

As others have said, proper boot fit is paramount,  try dressing in the lodge and let your feet warm up, and boots get as near room temp as possible before heading out. On 0 or below days add the boot glove to a room temp boot in the lodge and you'll be able to stay out all day on a 2 setting (that's with circulation issues like mine)..........I find that putting my boots on first and letting them warm while I have hot cocoa and put on my jacket and other upper deck gear last works for me.........
post #25 of 28
When I go skiing I put my boots on the floor of the car next to the right front seat and turn the heater on the floor vents.  I turn on the Hotronics heaters immediately after putting them on.  If you put them in the trunk or back seat on the way to skiing they will get cold and so will your feet.  Every little bit helps. 
post #26 of 28
I know this has probably already been said a bunch of times, but if your boots fit right you won't need boot gloves, electric heaters, charcoal baggies or any of that crap. Make sure at least the liners are warm and dry before you put them on.If you sweat like a pig like I do, change your sox halfway thru the day.
post #27 of 28
If you find that you are tightening the boots every time off the chair and unbuckling down at the lift line, would it be likely that there is a fitting issue? Involving cantng and alignment or just boot shape? It's mostly about tighten for control and unbuckle for pain relief and aleviating loss of circulation. I've pretty much always gone through this, but would rather not.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post

I know this has probably already been said a bunch of times, but if your boots fit right you won't need boot gloves, electric heaters, charcoal baggies or any of that crap. Make sure at least the liners are warm and dry before you put them on.If you sweat like a pig like I do, change your sox halfway thru the day.
post #28 of 28
+1 for most important fit.  Mntlion knows his stuff.  Start with a fit and dont worry about price.   Buy a boot that fits perfect, not one that is close and is cheaper.   Then go from there.  I use thermic heaters in my custom footbeds occasionally when it is really cold, but also have boot dryers/heaters that I use the night before skiing to make sure they are dry and warm when I put them on and it has made a huge difference.
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