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Opinions: Any chance "straight" skis will ever be mfr'd again? - Page 3

post #61 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by retroEric View Post

Well, mostly I just wanted to go fishing for a guy with bait in the water...

But if you watch this video, at about 50 seconds you'll see Jonny letting the energy of hitting the bump turn his skis.

In your video, with moguls that easy you don't need to heel swish. Just jam your tips into the mogul with your skis on edge and they'll come around. You'll get no scraping, and you're letting the skis absorb impact instead of just sliding into the mogul on a sideways ski with your forefoot.


 


yeah I am well aware I am pussy in bumps field and there is alot of improvement to be made. and yeah touche' forum thread like this make my head spin but also tons of fun to post in :). fishing for the fisherman isnt the easiest thing in the world.
post #62 of 79
Thanks for being a good sport about it. I really tossed out way too much chum. (But if a little is good, more must be better, right.) I would like to retract the word wrong. The skiers are obviously skilled and are skiing with premeditated style. It's clear they could change their style if they wanted to.

This thread appeals to me because 6 months ago I felt the same way as the original poster.

Now I feel like I want to explore the brave new world of non straight skis. I've realized that my skiing hasn't progressed in many, many years.  I've also been a bet afraid of getting on new skis and stinking up the slope.

Without passing judgement on anybody's way of enjoying skiing, I would like to nudge the neophobes towards neophilia.

Remember, there is no greater zealot than the recently converted.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
yeah I am well aware I am pussy in bumps field and there is alot of improvement to be made. and yeah touche' forum thread like this make my head spin but also tons of fun to post in :). fishing for the fisherman isnt the easiest thing in the world.

 
post #63 of 79
The Dynastar Legend series is the straightest out there in the 75-99 range. They were inthis direction with their pintail skis in the 90s,
meant straighter in the tail section. They are still straighter an therefore perform better for the tail sliding technique styles of skiing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aDOOrondack View Post

The examples of current "straight" skis provided in responding posts appear to be specialty skis (wide/powder, soft/moguls).
I doubt these would excel for hi-speed cruising using old-school parallel form on NE groomers?


 
post #64 of 79
Here is the heart of the 2019 K2 Ski Lineup.

List Price $2100

post #65 of 79
Whenever I read these old-school style threads, I have to chuckle.  Being old and having learned to ski on some very old skis, I should be skiing old style, but, you see, I skipped the lessons.  The closest thing I had to lessons was watching DH racing on the television; I didn't care too much for the SL racing.  This is what I thought people meant by old-school style.
http://archives.cbc.ca/sports/skiing/topics/417/

Very avant-guard stylish suit for the times though


Arcing edge-locked turns has always been the most fun way to ski, for some people.
post #66 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

I'd say at least 50meters to be considered straight. Maybe 45, not much less.
 

Hmmm, I have some skis from the mid-70's
170 83 65 74 = 41.1m
160 83 68 74 = 47.2m
150 84 70 75 = 45.9m

Now those 41m 170's are a pretty decent all-day piste ski and require little effort to turn them, but I've heard of folks who are used to <15m skis complain that they can't turn a 20-25m radius ski. I wouldn't call my 170's a shaped ski by any means, but I'd definitely call a 25m TR a shaped ski. I have a feeling the boundary between the two types is wide and fuzzy.
post #67 of 79
 Scotty Bob also makes custom skis to your specification (and there's a number of other small, specialty companies out there that do it, too: Igneous, 333, ...).

if you are referring to the current reverse camber/rocker "craze" as being new and trendy, just keep in mind that Shane McConkey and a few others were experimenting with these designs almost a decade ago. Volant made the Spatula in the early 2000's. the reason it's seen as trendy now is because all the major ski companies finally realized that these designs were valid and that people would buy them (because a lot of small ski companies were making them and selling them). the simple fact that the skiing magazines are touting this "new technology" is hilarious, as anybody who stays in tune with skiing equipment well knows that it's far from new technology.

additionally, why wouldn't you wish to take advantage of the new tech? i mean it's all fine and dandy to remember the olden days, but why not move into the present century, as well?

a wise old grandfatherly dude who was sitting next to me on my return flight from my first trip to Europe many, many years ago said: "Son, if you spend all of your time looking over your shoulder you'll miss what's coming up ahead."

Remember the past, but don't live in it. 

I say try some of these new and trendy ski designs, you might like 'em. If not, then shell out the $$$ to have one of the numerous small, indie ski companies custom make a ski to your specification (heck, Scotty Bob will even name the ski after you and include it in their catalog!).
post #68 of 79
The kind you are thinking about?

No. Never. No way.

I'm sorry to say that.

But why?

They are simply too effing hard to ski on, let alone learn how to use.

I, too, have paid my dues, and really enjoy the old skis. But it took me from years 5-10 to become comfortable in bumps, and another 10 more before I could ski any bump run non-stop. Maybe another 10 more years to refine style, so I'm now smooth and stable at speed in the bumps, and never get tired, ever. And I'm still improving, which makes everything easier and easier to do.

It took me about 30 years, but I feel that I've outgrown most ski areas now. Hope that doesn't sound as critical as it seems - I really enjoy the fact that I'm finally an "expert" (notice the quotes) skier now.

 

I just now wish for a 10,000 vertical foot ski hill, that's all. You know, maybe 50,000 acres and several dozen ultra high speed lifts to get you from bottom to top in less than 15 minutes. 15 - 20 mile long cruisers (wow, a 12 minute long downhill race at 70 mph!) Maybe in a future lifetime I'll have to find a different planet . . .


The longest, hardest runs on the mountain are simply to short and to easy for me now - however I'm not complaining, that makes them EXTREMELY FUN.

A White Raven
post #69 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by kermit88 View Post



I came this >< close to buying a pair of 220 Bonnas with the original brass Troll bindings on them yesterday.  
post #70 of 79

Hello,

Last week I cleaned my garage and found two pairs of rare skis. I saw them on ceilings

Shelf since I bought my house nine years ago. Surprisingly, they both are in very good conditions including boots guides. I sprayed a lot of WD 40. Any reasonable offers are welcome. Thank you.

Regards,

William

      1) SKI---- HEAD HRP COMP 74" LONG

           COMPETITION GLASSWRAP

           FOAM CORE CRACKED-EDGE

           MADE IN BOULDER CORORADO

           USA

           AMF

      GUIDE--- MARKER ST

    

2) SKI----FISCHER VP 70" long

                MADE IN AUSTRIA

    GUIDE----THUNDER

                      U.S.A. SWISS JAPAN

P.S. If anyone interest in, I will send photo.

post #71 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

There is nothing a straight ski does better than a modern ski, with that said there are some fairly straight modern skis out there.
.



Took my old 200 cm TR4's out for a lark last spring. 

 

Wouldn't want to race with them anymore, but they are still the best bump ski I've ever had.

post #72 of 79

There is still one thing a 50 m side cut radius ski does better than a 27 m radius ski, arc turns between 27 and 50 m radii.  However those turns are more suited to high speeds, and since it is becoming increasingly politically incorrect to ski at those speeds, I doubt straight skis will be making a comeback anytime soon.

post #73 of 79

I'm waiting for the return of the basic 275cm hickory ski with leather boots. This new-fangled metal and plastic and fibberglob stuff is just for you young whippersnappers who can't learn how to really ski! Give me Real Skis (TM) any day! If it's too easy, it's not worth doing!

 

What's old is new, right? People got down the hill on that equipment, didn't they? Why wouldn't long (really long), straight (really straight) skis come back? Doesn't everything?

 

FWIW, I have actually skied Rifle Sight Notch at Mary Jane on a pair of 207cm Karhus with a waist less than 60mm wide on 3-pin bindings with leather boots. And lived. Guess what? Heel push doesn't work very well on a rig like that. Standing on them accurately does work, just as it works for other types of ski equipment. It did require serious lead change, though!

 

So if you're serious about retro, don't go halfway.

 

I'll continue to struggle with my shaped skis, thank you.

post #74 of 79

Fat skis suck.

post #75 of 79

Didn't hart reintroduce a "Classic" Javlin model a couple years ago...a model which is gone now...presumeably because it didn't sell?  There's no reason for a manufacturer to continue making a ski that doesn't sell.

 

I'm 6'5", 195 lbs.  It's really hard for me to find clothes that fit.  Why?  Because most people aren't 6'5" and 195 lbs.  Zumiez and JcPenney etc., stock clothes for average sized people, and they sell alot of it.  Bit & Tall stores stock clothes that are just that...Big and Tall.  Not one or the other, but both.  They do this, because they've determined through trial and error, that that is what they will sell the most of, and thus make money. 

 

Ski companites figured out, quite easily, that if they make straight skis, they don't sell. (though snowboards will), but if they make shaped skis...and twin tipped skis...they sell a whole lot of them.  It's good business.

 

 

I remember in the winter of 99/00, I had just made the switch.  I was on a 201cm Hart F-17t in 1998, and a 178cm Rossignol Pow'Air in 1999.  Somewhere in the middle of the season, I pulled the Harts out just for the heck of it.  Holy crap I thought I was going to die.  Once you figure carving out, I found there was no reason to ever go back to skidding. (Until Tip and Tail butters started at least)

post #76 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

Didn't hart reintroduce a "Classic" Javlin model a couple years ago...a model which is gone now...presumeably because it didn't sell?  There's no reason for a manufacturer to continue making a ski that doesn't sell.

 

 



Well, sort of....

 

They were made in 1998 with dimentions of the day. They are a nice ski and you can imagine the comments from the older skiers on the lift! They were actually made by Atomic for hart. I bought a pair, can't speak for others, but don't blame me. I do ski on pure "straight" skis often.

 

 

(1998) Hart Javelin Repro (Atomic made), 201cm, 90-63-79

 

New Javelin98.jpg

 

post #77 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

The only reason to post this thread is to be elitist and stubborn.

Which you have done quite well.

 

I really enjoy taking out my 203 F9.1 Salomons, they are the bomb for bombing down groomers at mach looney, and work exceptionally well in ice bumps. I only ski them one or two days per year though, it keeps me honest and lets me know how much of my ability is me, and how much is just the equipment.

 

They were certainly worth the $15 I spent on them.

 

Edit: Oh, and to answer the thread starter,  straight skinny skis will never again be the only or the dominant ski shape. They may be offered for retro appeal, and mogul skis will always be skinny without much sidecut, but widening skis is a real improvement in technology for offpiste skiing, as is increasing sidecut for carving.
 

post #78 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post

I'm waiting for the return of the basic 275cm hickory ski with leather boots. This new-fangled metal and plastic and fibberglob stuff is just for you young whippersnappers who can't learn how to really ski! Give me Real Skis (TM) any day! If it's too easy, it's not worth doing!

 

 And you forget bear trap bindings. Now those separated the men from the boys! Not to mention the legs from the ankles. 

post #79 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post



Which you have done quite well.

 

I really enjoy taking out my 203 F9.1 Salomons, they are the bomb for bombing down groomers at mach looney, and work exceptionally well in ice bumps. I only ski them one or two days per year though, it keeps me honest and lets me know how much of my ability is me, and how much is just the equipment.

 

They were certainly worth the $15 I spent on them.

 

Edit: Oh, and to answer the thread starter,  straight skinny skis will never again be the only or the dominant ski shape. They may be offered for retro appeal, and mogul skis will always be skinny without much sidecut, but widening skis is a real improvement in technology for offpiste skiing, as is increasing sidecut for carving.
 



not figuring skinny into the OP's query, look at the demensions on the Salomon Czar. Talk about straight! And a few Pro models out there, like the Kreitler I think. I think it's a current powder concept, can't be that fun on groomers or ice, all tail thrust.

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