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Dorsiflexion "Muscle" Question - Page 2

post #31 of 48
Welcome Insideedge! Great thread everyone! Just an aside: The abiility to dorsiflex begins to decrease in your late 20s! You may want to think about doing things to keep the tibialis anterior, soleus, etc. active year round! [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #32 of 48
Downwardly Mobile, your most recent post got me thinking and yes, it could be another thread. It's a great topic.

I've long noticed a bias in ski instruction, often among many more physically gifted athlete/educators, toward visual and cognitive instruction with little or no grounding in accurate or in-depth biomechanical description. Their gift to our world is the beautiful, inspiring images they can present of flowing, dynamic performance and hence, their teaching for many who learn best in these modes.
But their teaching no matter how impassioned does not fully gratify everyone, particularly the kinesthetic learner who progresses by exploring just how to create the universe of varying feelings and sensations in our wonderfully sensual sport of skiing. I wonder how many of these students who come to us eventually abandon instruction or the sport itself because their needs have not been met and they are not progressing. I see many of this type of learner in women's clinics and private lessons particularly.
This type of learner also often seems to get mislabelled in unhelpful ways, particularly those who have less of a sports background or are not as physically gifted but nevertheless can progress quite readily if they are given appropriate coaching. Interestingly, those who primarily need to know "how" to perform certain movements with accuracy and "what" feelings should result can get misinterpreted as being "overly cognitive" learners who "think too much" as they attempt to process and apply the directives they're given which can seem maddeningly vague. Hence perhaps the "anti-verbal" and "anti-feeling" bias you perceive which is not just common to your particular locker room: on a broader cultural level it kinda reminds me of that old high school phenomenon we all once knew as "nerds" vs. "jocks".
As I see it there's at least two things to do right away which can help. They are to:
1) reframe frustration into simple amusement at humanity's wacky need (it's beyond genetics, it seems like our primary spiritual challenge) to feel superior to one another - when really, it's just about variation in learning styles!
2) seek out a high-level mentor who is capable of crossing over, and teaching and exploring in the modes you're comfortable. Their facility is truly a gift, and they're out there, as you can see by reading posts by people like Pierre and others at this website.
Best of luck to you on your journey, and particularly, with your boots. Please report back, and don't give up.
post #33 of 48
Quote:
Originally posted by Lisamarie:
The abiility to dorsiflex begins to decrease in your late 20s!
aaaarrrrgggghhhh - no wonder it was hard to learn to do!!!!
post #34 of 48
Nope, no offense taken! I knew I was opening up a can of worms and you guys came up with some very good points! My explanations were overly simplistic, but I did that to prove a point that if things are broken down and kept simple, basic and easy, most have a better chance of understanding and really changing their skiing. A course in skeletal biomechanics would help any skier and really is not that hard to understand. One reason I really like relating to joints is we have so few of them compared to muscle groups!

Remember your good turns and forget your bad ones!
post #35 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by insideedge:
One reason I really like relating to joints is we have so few of them compared to muscle groups!

Remember your good turns and forget your bad ones!
Excellent point, especially if simplicity is high on your list of values. (And I could use a bit of coaching in that regard!)

But consider this as well...

One reason I like focusing on muscles rather than joints is that my joints oftentimes are a bit achy, whereas my muscles are a source of more "friendly" feedback!

What Vera called
Quote:
our wonderfully sensual sport of skiing
is more pleasurably sensual for me personally when focusing on my muscles, rather than my joints.

Also, as a woman, often skiing with men who are bigger and stronger than me, I am still striving to feel "stronger" in my skiing. (Girls, does that strike a chord with any of you? Boys, I'm asking you too of course. I don't want to be sexist here!)

(My)joints are rather helpless in their potential to enhance that feeling of power(safety?) that I seek, since I'm always worrying to some extent that they're going to "blow out". Muscles, INMO, have greater potential in terms of enhancing a sense of "control" - often why students come to ski school, whether guy or gal!

I think both points of view (joints and muscles) are valuable and important. One cool thing about teaching skiing is playing with multiple points of view and finding out what resonates with the student. Keeps it fresh.

And, speaking of student, I to tend to have my more satisfying, and I like to think, effective, teaching experiences when I'm able to share a "good feeling" with a student rather than trying to manipulate them into jumping through some kind of "task" related hoops.

Uh, oh, wait a minute - "jumping through hoops" - maybe I'm really just still trying to come to terms with my own level III exam experience

One last thing. Especially for women looking to feel stronger. Take a look at her: http://www.asianart.com/articles/patachitra/28.html Now there's a strong woman role model for ya!

And notice her CM and fabulously long outside leg! Does anyone recognize that examiner she's with? [img]tongue.gif[/img]

Great stuff here, guys and gals. So helpful to me. I wish all of you happy joints and muscles too!
post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally posted by Downwardly Mobile:

Also, as a woman, often skiing with men who are bigger and stronger than me, I am still striving to feel "stronger" in my skiing. (Girls, does that strike a chord with any of you? Boys, I'm asking you too of course. I don't want to be sexist here!)
Ummm - except for when holding a tuck I don't often feel I am lacking strength....
Bigger is only a problem jumping across creeks - where my vertically challenged state gives me poor reach to the other side & I jump badly in ski boots! (Especially onto wet granite rocks in creeks)
Small size means I can go under trees the guys have to push through or go around.

Quote:
Originally posted by Downwardly Mobile:


(My)joints are rather helpless in their potential to enhance that feeling of power(safety?) that I seek, since I'm always worrying to some extent that they're going to "blow out". Muscles, INMO, have greater potential in terms of enhancing a sense of "control" - often why students come to ski school, whether guy or gal!
I feel more controlled when I "stack" my skeleton - so my body can work properly.

I tend to find that when I try to use muscles to "control" a movement I make the muscles tense - which results in poor skiing.
Also the harder I try to "make a turn" a certain way by muscle control the less likely I am to do so.
I achieve best results by focusing on REALLY learning a movement pattern & then when it is TRUELY learnt just using a focus that does NOT require any thought about the movement - but will require the movement to achieve it. "Fuzzy focus" - we use it in fencing a lot - think about what you will do the next time the opponent pulls his favourite move - focus really HARD on it - then just let go & play with him in some way that will induce the move you want - when the time comes your body WILL do the move - all by itself in super slow mo extended time - you will hit him without effort.

I find I ski better as I learn to me more subtle & less powerful - now if I could just harness the head space a little better!
post #37 of 48
Quote:
One reason I like focusing on muscles rather than joints is that my joints oftentimes are a bit achy, whereas my muscles are a source of more "friendly" feedback!
ROFL ain't that the truth.

I skied with Chris Fallows on D team yesterday. He took some video of us and slowed it down. Now I am a tinker feeler type of learner and the minute I saw that video I could pick out lots of little movements in there that didn't belong. I am sitting there thinking, "what is causing that and what muscles are involved". The result was obviously paralysis through analysis and muscles that were tense because the brain was overloading them. Thinker feelers have the damnest time because the two are opposite learning styles. The brain is demanding action from the body and the body is telling the brain to shut up and just let them do the feely touchy thing. I can only take about one day of the D team without some time to sort things out. I am smart enough to grasp everything that is said but need time for the touchy feely part of me to catch up. Also watching others in the group who are at the upper levels of skiing just screws everything up all the more.

Lets explore that last sentence as it heavily pertains to what this thread has developed into. When we are trying to develop our skiing at the high levels, the differences are in all the little movements going on below the knees that you cannot see. Trying to do so, only serves to make us static. I think this is because we don't see any action so we don't do any action. Watcher/doers are at a big advantage at the lower levels of skiing and lose their advantages at the upper levels without the right coach.

Understanding the little movements that take place in the boots is key to very high levels of skiing. Since we cannot see our feet in the boot, visual learners need to have their boots off to understand. Once the boots are on, we can feel tension in the lower leg muscles that are involved in the movements. This is how to tune in. Being able to tune in and isolate a movement in you're skiing, is what allows you to dispense with all the other crappy movements that are going on. That can be a bit like watching paint dry.

As far as generating power through strength goes; forget it. That is the stuff of world cup atheletes. Learn to shut down the muscle groups that are not involved and tune into the ones that are. Through that method, you can learn to stack the skeleton using the kenetic chain from the feet up and generate power through being in a stacked balanced position throughout you're turns. That is fineness, not brut force.
[img]smile.gif[/img]
post #38 of 48
[quote]Originally posted by Pierre:
Quote:
As far as generating power through strength goes; forget it. That is the stuff of world cup atheletes. Learn to shut down the muscle groups that are not involved and tune into the ones that are. Through that method, you can learn to stack the skeleton using the kenetic chain from the feet up and generate power through being in a stacked balanced position throughout you're turns. That is fineness, not brut force.
[img]smile.gif[/img]
In my mind, this understanding (finally), is what allowed me to start to improve and enjoy my skiing much more. I sure wish I had gotten this advice or figured this out, up front. I'm sure I would be further along at this point.

Having said that, and feeling stupid for not realizing and/or understanding this much sooner, it's clear watching many others from the chair, that a lot of other skiers don't get this as well. It's kind of funny really. Many skiers can be seen making big movements, muscling the skis down the slope with their shoulder, hips, and arms going everywhere, while the others are flowing seamlessly down the hill, almost looking like they're making no movements at all. Quite a contrast in effort and style.

[ February 03, 2004, 05:40 AM: Message edited by: Coach13 ]
post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally posted by vera:


I wonder how many of these students who come to us eventually abandon instruction or the sport itself because their needs have not been met and they are not progressing.
This type of learner also often seems to get mislabelled in unhelpful ways...
... those who primarily need to know "how" to perform certain movements with accuracy and "what" feelings should result can get misinterpreted as being "overly cognitive" learners who "think too much" as they attempt to process and apply the directives... It's just about variation in learning styles!
Been there, done that, been labeled, decided not to worry about instructors' short-sightedness or inexperience (needed to get old for this one)

One thing it impressed on me was that you get more out the more you put in. I was forced to examine how I learnt things and became a bit less defensive in my quest. I am not average! But neither are most people.

It is a shame that learning style is not a school subject with the emphasis on personal learning style. I am sure so many people would gain from it. It is hard to cover at the beginning of a lesson or on the lift as most people have to think about it for sometimes a considerable while before any worthwhile conclusion can be made. If you get it spot on they can get a great lesson.

I had one student in a group who was about 7 and had skied for a couple of seasons. He was fumbling in a poor wedge/wedge to parallel on the warmup on a green run. We, as a group, repared to really easy terrain and we discussed an exercise to do there. He said 'What, like the racers on TV'. I said 'yes' and he presented a good parallel with some edging skills. Mum said he had never skied like that before.
The next day, due to class requirements, he skied with another instructor's group who got him right behind on his heels through the moguls. He had massively overtaken his elder brother in ability in a few hours. His mum was impressed. We suggested she buy him some instructional videos for the off-season along with using the best skier they could find as an instructor. He was an exceedingly visual learner and would pick up any of your own poor habits.

OFF topic move if you want.
post #40 of 48
Thread Starter 
OK, I'm such a nerd, I proudly admit I like to read the dictionary for fun!

I ask you check out all the possible meanings (listed below) of the word "strong" that came up in an online dictionary!!!

What a minefield this communication thing is, eh? Probably explains the anti-verbal bias thing. Minefields aren't so much fun! I do feel that words (especially, tricky ones, should be used with extreme caution in ski teaching. That being said however, I would like to state that I see a need for using them correctly and taking the time to check for understanding.

What I was trying to describe when I used the word "strong" in regard to my own skiing goals (really an emotional thing)was a blend of #3 and #12 below.

1. Physically powerful; capable of exerting great physical force.
2. Marked by great physical power: a strong blow to the head.

3. In good or sound health; robust: a strong constitution; a strong heart.

4. Economically or financially sound or thriving: a strong economy.
5. Having force of character, will, morality, or intelligence: a strong personality.
6. Having or showing ability or achievement in a specified field: students who are strong in chemistry.
7. Capable of the effective exercise of authority: a strong leader.
8. Capable of withstanding force or wear; solid, tough, or firm: a strong building; a strong fabric.
9. Having great binding strength: a strong adhesive.
10. Not easily captured or defeated: a strong flank; a strong defense.
11. Not easily upset; resistant to harmful or unpleasant influences: strong nerves; a strong stomach.

12. Having force or rapidity of motion: a strong current.

13. Persuasive, effective, and cogent: a strong argument.
14. Forceful and pointed; emphatic: a strong statement.
15. Forthright and explicit, often offensively so: strong language.
16. Extreme; drastic: had to resort to strong measures.
17. Having force of conviction or feeling; uncompromising: strong faith; a strong supporter.
18. Intense in degree or quality: a strong emotion; strong motivation.

19. Having an intense or offensive effect on the senses: strong light; strong vinegar; strong cologne.
20. Clear and loud: a strong voice.
21. Readily noticeable; remarkable: a strong resemblance; a strong contrast.
22. Readily detected or received: a strong radio signal.

23. Having a high concentration of an essential or active ingredient: mixed a strong solution of bleach and water.
24. Containing a considerable percentage of alcohol: strong punch.
25. Powerfully effective: a strong painkiller.
26. Characterized by a high degree of saturation.
27. Having a specified number of units or members: a military force 100,000 strong.
28. Marked by steady or rising prices: a strong market.

adv.
In a strong, powerful, or vigorous manner; forcefully: a salesperson who comes on too strong.

Coach13 said In my mind, this understanding (finally), is what allowed me to start to improve and enjoy my skiing much more. I sure wish I had gotten this advice or figured this out, up front. I'm sure I would be further along at this point.

I think this is a hugely common experience. Here's a really cynical question (which ties into the salesperson reference at the end of the list of definitions.)

If we get too good at communicating with our students, are we shooting ourselves in the foot (pun intended) economically?

And does the business of ski instructing rely to some extent on perpetuating confusion within the customer? If we really fix all their problems super efficiently, is it bad for business?

I think not (there's always new terrain, etc. etc. to keep 'em coming back.)

What is really underlying my cynicism are some recent conversations I have had with my "betters" where I thought there was subtle "information hoarding" going on. Kind of an "I struggled for years/paid a lot of money to master this and I'll be damned if I'm gonna let you onto the fast track". Maybe that's how all organizations operate to a certain extent, and I just have to suck it up and keep paying my dues...

Another cynical observation: I think that within the ranks of ski instructors, (present company excepted, of course) there is a damaging withholding of information that goes on, often justifying itself as a "guided discovery" teaching method.

Or am I just showing my tendencies towards paranoia?

I agree with what some others have suggested about a new thread. Or, maybe even better, is it possible to rename a thread? How do you like "Musclehead"?

Seriously, I think that would be an accurate (and amusing) name. What's behind our exploration here is a teaching methodology (head) question rather than a skiing mechanics (muscle) question.

Can't wait to hear what you think.

[ February 03, 2004, 08:19 AM: Message edited by: Downwardly Mobile ]
post #41 of 48
Downwardly Mobile said:
Quote:
What is really underlying my cynicism are some recent conversations I have had with my "betters" where I thought there was subtle "information hoarding" going on. Kind of an "I struggled for years/paid a lot of money to master this and I'll be damned if I'm gonna let you onto the fast track". Maybe that's how all organizations operate to a certain extent, and I just have to suck it up and keep paying my dues...

Another cynical observation: I think that within the ranks of ski instructors, (present company excepted, of course) there is a damaging withholding of information that goes on, often justifying itself as a "guided discovery" teaching method.

Or am I just showing my tendencies towards paranoia?
In you're own frustration you are reading more into it than you should. How do I know this? Because that is exactly what I did. I felt like the quote "Dig deep within grasshopper and you will seek the truth". My thoughts were "I ain't got time for games".

Those same upper level skiers who I thought were not sharing, were not sharing because they did not really understand what they were skiing themselves. They understand what they want to see from us in the way of movements and can pick out unwanted problems. They do not necessarily know why the movements are occuring. They tell you the problems, show you how it should be done but don't tell you how to get there because they don't really know. You are left to figure it out and tune into you're own skiing. Conspiracy? Attitude? No. When I ski with the D team or folks like Bob Barnes and Ric Rieter I see the difference.

Guided discovery is a very hard form of teaching to use properly and requires a controlled set of guidelines with a known outcome. When a instructor does not fully understand the biomechanical movements in skiing, as they relate to all the extraneous unwanted movement patterns, a variable confusing result is the outcome. This form of guided discovery can be degrading and is rampant at least in central division. Guided discovery is paticularly frustrating in exam prep.

Even the D team does not really play the guided discovery thing. You get the movements, what the outcome should be and feedback on how you are doing. Easy and uncluttered. They get results without you needing to be a monk.

Guided discovery works better at the lower levels of skiing. When we get to the higher levels, guided discovery can be a nightmare.
post #42 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Nettie:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by vera:


I wonder how many of these students who come to us eventually abandon instruction or the sport itself because their needs have not been met and they are not progressing.
This type of learner also often seems to get mislabelled in unhelpful ways...
... those who primarily need to know "how" to perform certain movements with accuracy and "what" feelings should result can get misinterpreted as being "overly cognitive" learners who "think too much" as they attempt to process and apply the directives... It's just about variation in learning styles!
Been there, done that, been labeled, decided not to worry about instructors' short-sightedness or inexperience (needed to get old for this one)

One thing it impressed on me was that you get more out the more you put in. I was forced to examine how I learnt things and became a bit less defensive in my quest. I am not average! But neither are most people.

It is a shame that learning style is not a school subject with the emphasis on personal learning style. I am sure so many people would gain from it. It is hard to cover at the beginning of a lesson or on the lift as most people have to think about it for sometimes a considerable while before any worthwhile conclusion can be made. If you get it spot on they can get a great lesson.

I had one student in a group who was about 7 and had skied for a couple of seasons. He was fumbling in a poor wedge/wedge to parallel on the warmup on a green run. We, as a group, repared to really easy terrain and we discussed an exercise to do there. He said 'What, like the racers on TV'. I said 'yes' and he presented a good parallel with some edging skills. Mum said he had never skied like that before.
The next day, due to class requirements, he skied with another instructor's group who got him right behind on his heels through the moguls. He had massively overtaken his elder brother in ability in a few hours. His mum was impressed. We suggested she buy him some instructional videos for the off-season along with using the best skier they could find as an instructor. He was an exceedingly visual learner and would pick up any of your own poor habits.

OFF topic move if you want.
</font>[/quote]Nettie, the part about the "need to become less defensive" strikes a (loud) chord with me. I assume you do not mean a physical defensiveness in your skiing, but rather an emotional defensiveness having, in this case, to do with relationships with other instructors.

I think I'm in the "same boat". And my boat was starting to swamp, with some of these unprocessed feelings. You guys have been so fantastic in helping me bail it out!

I do think another thread may be called for here - or maybe one already exists? - about the emotional component of being a "feeler". I coined a new (to me) term yesterday - "ski-chiatrist". I was thinking of putting it on my business card. (If you steal my idea, I'll come steal your skis, so don't even think about it!)

This reminds me of my favorite ski writer (forgive me other illustrious authors out there), the awesome Mermer Blakeslee. I know she was (still is?) heavily involved with the PSIA ed staff, which is awesome. If only we could clone her, so each ski school could have one!

Speaking of education materials, I notice that the very first subject addressed in the "Core Concepts" manual is guess what...

"Meaningful Relationships" and I quote:
"The biggest factor in determining teaching successes or failures is the ability to relate successfully with students."

Who shares my frustration that, the "general ski instructor culture" (and I suspect my own beloved midwest is probably the most extreme example) shows a distinct lack of interest in/respect for the importance of things like relationships and feelings in a ski lesson? PSIA talks the talk, but do instructors in general (even at the ed staff level sometimes) walk the walk?!

As I sit here spending hours of time pondering these things, it all of a sudden dawns on me that maybe a huge factor here is the time scarcity issue. Regrettably, most folks (myself included, until I quit my "real job") simply don't have the time to deal with these things! And organizational changes (not to mention personal ones), take time.

So I guess, like with so many skiing related matters, one must learn patience . Toward that end, one thing I do to help me deal with my frustrations is to try to adopt a historical, big picture perspective: I remind myself that a huge part of the ski industry (as did many other industries) was laid out on a military model. Think "Tenth Mountain Division" - also my heroes - and their huge influence on the birth of so many resorts! (Cosmic Question Alert: If WWII hadn't happened, would there even be a profession of ski instruction?) So not all military things are bad things, right?

I do hope however, that, as time goes on, we can develop more of a "peace-keeping" consciousness in that little army of "fun crusaders" known as ski instructors.

So, thanks everyone. I think I may want to stay in this business, afterall. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img] and Salute!
post #43 of 48
Downwardly Mobile said:
Quote:
I coined a new (to me) term yesterday - "ski-chiatrist". I was thinking of putting it on my business card. (If you steal my idea, I'll come steal your skis, so don't even think about it!)
I don't see any copywrite? This is an open forum, consider it stolen.

At the end of yesterdays skiing with the D team I was confused and dazed at the end of the day. In my dazed state, a younger ski instructor came up to me and said: "You screwed up my whole skiing! You yanked the rug out from underneath me and made me look at my own skiing from an entirely different perpective. I am now thinking about the intent in my mind that has dictated my skiing and simply changing my intent is making profound changes in my skiing. I am in a state of confusion because you burst my comfortable bubble. Thank you." Amazing considering that I felt the same way after skiing with Chris Fallows. I felt like a tornado had come and turned my trailer over again. [img]graemlins/angel.gif[/img]
post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally posted by Pierre:
Amazing considering that I felt the same way after skiing with Chris Fallows. I felt like a tornado had come and turned my trailer over again. [img]graemlins/angel.gif[/img]
That's good. I assume that all adds up to further learning experiences for the rest of us here in the near future....right. [img]smile.gif[/img]

In all seriousness, I'd love to hear what you learned and/or experienced that had such an affect on you.
post #45 of 48
Thread Starter 
Yah, Pierre, I thought your ski prowess was a lot more substantial than a trailer! Maybe a "doublewide"? [img]tongue.gif[/img]

If you're gonna steal my "ski-chiatrist", I'm takin' yer "yah"!
post #46 of 48
[quote]Originally posted by Downwardly Mobile:
Speaking of education materials, I notice that the very first subject addressed in the "Core Concepts" manual is guess what...

"Meaningful Relationships" and I quote:
"The biggest factor in determining teaching successes or failures is the ability to relate successfully with students."

Who shares my frustration that, the "general ski instructor culture" (and I suspect my own beloved midwest is probably the most extreme example) shows a distinct lack of interest in/respect for the importance of things like relationships and feelings in a ski lesson? PSIA talks the talk, but do instructors in general (even at the ed staff level sometimes) walk the walk?!

DM, I don't take issue with what you see as I see it as well but as Nettie said, age (and a sense of humor as you have) can definitely help in going against the paradigm.
Where I work now the most successful and skilled instructors build great longterm relationships with their guests. Since here much of our lesson base is destination visitors and return business, this practice is reinforced by our pay incentives, culture and mission statement. This practice is foundational to facilitating effective learning, powerful experiences and frankly, good business. At your resort are there at least some who work along these lines? If not what are the environmental factors in place which might continue to buttress the culture you see now for trainers and instructors?
Relative to PSIA again I won't generalize on a regional or national level, but go to the PSIA website, click on Rocky Mtn. Division and look at educational materials. There is a workbook for sale there for ten bucks called "Guest-Centered Teaching" which describes what great instructors do in creating consistently excellent lessons. This is not new information but it does give structure to the elements of a powerful learning partnership in an accessible way for everyone, whatever their level of teaching experience. It is all about student motivation and the affective domain as primary in the learning process. In fact the GCT grid is the basis for certification exam scoring for all levels in this division. I think you might enjoy perusing this info.
post #47 of 48
Coach 13 said:
Quote:
In all seriousness, I'd love to hear what you learned and/or experienced that had such an affect on you.
That is beyond my scope at the present time as I am only starting to assess the damgages. I saw things on video in my skiing that I had no idea were there. Others with very good eyes in this area could see them but were not sure where they were eminating from. Chris Fallows could see them but could not access exactly what was causing the movements. The extraneous movements to me looked as clumbsy as and elephant on skis. Shock and awe. That in itself was not earth shaking.

Chris presented a concept for teaching and self diagnosis that involves the idea of isolating different skill sets, something that is presented in PSIA but never understood because of the integration of skills. It involves simple exercises created by the instructor to let only certain movements happen while all other movements are eliminated. On snow I played with this enough to know that it is different than anything that I have been exposed to previously. How to do it is difficult to understand unless you see it presented. Another way of saying that is; I can't put it into words yet. That tool, in and of itself, is not earth shaking.

Opening up my mind here at home and pulling out reference materials such as Bob's Book and Ron LeMasters book and applying my knowledge of biomechanics to this simple concept presented by Chris is taking me down paths that I didn't expect. I can now understand why those movements that are in my skiing and understand where they are coming from. Those paths I am following are damaging to some of the closely held beliefs that I hold. That realization results in the same feeling that I see in the faces of those folks on TV who are standing in front of a trash heap that was their trailer and hour before. So far the damages have been isolated to rotary and its application. It could go much deeper than that by the time I am done.

The bottom line is that I am only just beginning the understand the power of the simple teaching concepts that Chris presented. I have found no inconsistencies in stuff presented by my references only inconsistencies of my understanding and that of the local trainers who taught me.

I have no brain insurance so I must rebuild my trailer and this time, reinforce it.
post #48 of 48
Thread Starter 
Vera, thanks so much for that recommendation. Just one more in a long list of incidences of not seeing something "right under my own nose". I "super-sized" my order and got the Standards DVD also! :

Since no one's calling me back about my boots, I guess I'll just have to spend my money elsewhere for today?

Since you mentioned humor as coping mechanism, I'm wondering if you happened to see my PM? Am I just way too sleep deprived or is that video thing pretty amazing!
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