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Snow goggles over prescription glasses?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Any suggestions on Goggles over glasses?
Make, model, and options???????
 
post #2 of 11
I have the same issue, so what you'll be looking for are coke bottles that protrude out from the face to allow it to accomodate glasses (kind of a duh here).  I have a SCOTT of which I cannot remember the model, and a pair of Smith Spectra OTG's.

http://www.smithoptics.com/Over-The-Glass-(OTG)_Category_14.html?fl=flase

There are all the current makes of OTG (over the glass) that smith has right now, you can also check other companies to see what they offer.  My Smith's cost me $60 canuckian if you would like to know.

Of course you could always go with contacts, that's what the old man does.

How goes the ski's search?  You will be amazed how well modern planks perform.
post #3 of 11
Not sure what your comfort level is with the OTG goggles or with inserts.  I currently use Uvex G120 goggles, which are actually made to your prescription so there is no insert or glasses + goggles combination.  They work well and seem to be a better solution for me related to the fogging that usually comes along with the OTG goggles.  Just another option ....
post #4 of 11
I generally use a set of Zeal Sphericals or a set of Bolle Modulators over my prescription glasses. I don't believe either set of goggles is marked "OTG" - meaning they weren't specifically made to go over prescription glasses. I just tried them on over my glasses and they fit without touching the inside of the goggle lense anywhere. I forget if I had to do this with these two current goggles, but I have several times removed a chunk of foam from the side of the goggle surround to better fit the frame (earpieces) of my glasses.

Having said this my glasses are a modern set of distance-only prescription glasses with pretty small size and lightweight polycarbonate lenses. I do religiously use an anti-fog cloth to clean my glasses in the morning as I get ready to go skiing, and this helps reduce fogging tremendously by leaving a coating on anti-fog compound on my glasses all day. I almost never use the cloth on the goggles. If there is ever fogging it is always on the glasses inside the goggles, right when I stop skiing at a rest point or at the end of a run when the airflow through the goggles stops and I'm pretty heated up. If it happens, it usually clears quickly if I lift the goggles while I wait.

I find this solution works best for me since I can still see clearly when I go into a lodge and remove the goggles as I still have my prescription glasses on (unlike goggles with built-in prescription inserts, which when removed take away the prescription - which would cause me to have to eat/drink with goggles on to see around the bar). I can also read a menu or bill by merely peaking around/under my glasses (normal for me as I don't ever wear reading glasses), which I couldn't do if I had distance vision contacts in my eyes or had distance corrected lasik surgery (as either of these distance vision solutions would require me carrying and pulling out a set of reading glasses - the reason why I do neither as neither eliminates glasses altogether).

Do consider the different alternatives for you though, as the tradeoffs are different for many people and you need to decide for yourself what works for you. For example, my wife needs distance correction like me and she often wears contacts under her goggles. However, she relies on me to do any reading of menus or bill paying (pretty much normal for us anyway) as she cannot read unless she takes her contacts out. She tried monovision with two different contacts and that didn't work for her. Sometimes she also wears glasses under her goggles like me - when her contacts bother her eyes...
Edited by CHRISfromRI - 11/8/09 at 7:24am
post #5 of 11
post #6 of 11
 I've struggled with this issue for 30 years --  as long as I've been skiing. While some goggles are marked OTG it's important to try them on with your glasses on. I thought I would have no problem with my small modern frameless glasses, but my first pair, the titanium hingeless kind that simply flex from the front of the frame, turned out to be quite wide altho they looked small, and I had to cut slits in the goggle foam along the sides to accommodate the earpieces. This was a problem because the glasses stuck to the goggles when I removed them. I've struggled with fog the whole time, but using a liquid defogger on the glasses first thing in the lodge helps, and if you don't have any, liquid soap from the rest room works well too, but it's hard to leave a film without smearing. Smith turbos work well too, if you find a pair that fits. They make a couple of different models.

But I'm now about to do the ultimate fix, cataract surgery. I'm going to have a distant vision monofocal lens put in, so I won't be nearsighted for the first time in over 60 years. I'll carry reading g lasses for the lodge.
post #7 of 11
But I'm now about to do the ultimate fix, cataract surgery. I'm going to have a distant vision monofocal lens put in, so I won't be nearsighted for the first time in over 60 years. I'll carry reading g lasses for the lodge.
 

So Evan, will you be glassless for ESA-Stowe?
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
 thanks for the info. bought a pair of Volkl Ac50's.
post #9 of 11
Try the Oakley L-frame
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by evansilver View Post

 I've struggled with this issue for 30 years --  as long as I've been skiing. While some goggles are marked OTG it's important to try them on with your glasses on. I thought I would have no problem with my small modern frameless glasses, but my first pair, the titanium hingeless kind that simply flex from the front of the frame, turned out to be quite wide altho they looked small, and I had to cut slits in the goggle foam along the sides to accommodate the earpieces. This was a problem because the glasses stuck to the goggles when I removed them. I've struggled with fog the whole time, but using a liquid defogger on the glasses first thing in the lodge helps, and if you don't have any, liquid soap from the rest room works well too, but it's hard to leave a film without smearing. Smith turbos work well too, if you find a pair that fits. They make a couple of different models.

But I'm now about to do the ultimate fix, cataract surgery. I'm going to have a distant vision monofocal lens put in, so I won't be nearsighted for the first time in over 60 years. I'll carry reading g lasses for the lodge.
I feel your pain brutha. I've had good luck with Smith goggles lately. I'm not sure which model but I tried them on with glasses and helmet and they fit great, they have a double lens that helps with the fogging.

The other thing that I've found that helps out with fogging is to keep your body cool by layering properly and leave the goggles on. By taking them on and off you are constantly adding cold air and moisture into the little micro-environment that exists under the lenses. That, and keeping your breathe out of the bottom vents. I have yet to find a way to use a cover for my upper face and nose without instantly fogging my goggles.
post #11 of 11
I would recommend Uvex goggles and they do make a model that goes over your glasses. My current several-year old pair which I will be replacing this year since the foam finally wore out have been nothing short of amazing and they work over my glasses just fine. I never have issues with fogging and I know friends who have tried other brands and have problems quite a bit.

Check it out here:

http://www.uvexsports.com/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=U5576125129
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