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wax question

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
im looking to start waxing and need a question answered concerning wax. i have 6 pairs of skis and 2 snowboards to wax, upstate NY skiing, no racing, just rec skiing. all the skis and boards are new, and have only been skied on once, and some havent been skied on at all. I looked at the hydrocarbon all temp wax, but it says not for base cleaning or conditioning, use red or green wax for cleaning/conditioning.  is this wax ok being the skis have only been skied on once? im not sure about what the temps will be or anything like that, will this wax be ok or not? if not, what should i use? the red or green are to be used after the skis have been skied on a few times?   sorry for all the dumb questions, thank you again for all the help
post #2 of 13
That question sounds like it's about the racewax.com waxes?    You're probably best waiting for Dr.D to answer.
post #3 of 13
For now, wax them all with red.  The green is for cold, dry conditions, not sure you'll really need that where you are skiing, you can always decide the night before that you need to apply that because it'll be super cold the next day and you weren't expecting that when you waxed and it'll be fine to apply it over the red. 
post #4 of 13
Always miss wax colder/harder rather than warmer.  Especially if you ski on manmade stuff in the Northeast.
post #5 of 13
So, basically, he says wax them all with green.
post #6 of 13
FWIW, we discussed this by phone (and to err towards colder wax when in doubt for better glide and durability) and to get Monkers started I sent him some wax with these general 'get the ball rolling' instructions:

On all of your boards:
  1. hot scrape and brush with the Briko-Maplus Universal Hot (white)
  2. hot wax, scrape and brush one or two times with the Briko-Maplus Race Base Prep Soft (red)
  3. hot wax, scrape and brush once with the Briko-Maplus Race base Prep Hard (pale green) (for more durable wax base to resist base burn)
  4. if it's cold simply use the Race Base Hard: snow temperature -30 to -10 degrees C (-22 to 14 degrees F).
  5. for moderate temperatures use the Universal (*green) -15° to 5°C/5° to 23°F Snow Temperature.
  6. If warm use the Universal Hot (white) -5° to 0°C/23° to 32°F & above Snow Temperature.

Additional note: The RB Hard, is, and tough to scrape. Use a hot touch crayoning or smearing method to minimize the amount of applied wax to reduce scraping and brushing. Also, see Efficient Hot Waxing video.

Edit:
* Maplus Universal (green) is changing to Briko-Maplus (red). Same wax, different color.
Edited by Alpinord - 11/7/09 at 12:23pm
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

For now, wax them all with red.  The green is for cold, dry conditions, not sure you'll really need that where you are skiing, you can always decide the night before that you need to apply that because it'll be super cold the next day and you weren't expecting that when you waxed and it'll be fine to apply it over the red. 
agree
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkers View Post

im looking to start waxing and need a question answered concerning wax. i have 6 pairs of skis and 2 snowboards to wax, upstate NY skiing, no racing, just rec skiing. all the skis and boards are new, and have only been skied on once, and some havent been skied on at all. I looked at the hydrocarbon all temp wax, but it says not for base cleaning or conditioning, use red or green wax for cleaning/conditioning.  is this wax ok being the skis have only been skied on once? im not sure about what the temps will be or anything like that, will this wax be ok or not? if not, what should i use? the red or green are to be used after the skis have been skied on a few times?   sorry for all the dumb questions, thank you again for all the help
Colder rated waxes are less useful for the purpose of conditioning (prepping the ski by waxing several times before skiing for the purpose of maximizing the wax penetration to build a reservoir for skiing) because they harden faster than a warm.  For this you need a warm rated wax that stays liquid longer (for penetration).  All the waxes can be used for skiing.  For your purpose the temperature is not so critical, but when in doubt wax colder and you will be fine.  The best thing you can do is keep them waxed.  You will notice more of a difference waxed/unwaxed than getting the temp slightly wrong.  So don't wait to wax them by skiing on them several times.
post #9 of 13
Alpinords idea will work great, and he has some great wax.  But for many it is too complicated.  Below is a simple way to wax a lot of skis and boards.


I don't know anyone else doing this, but most my friends are too lazy to wax or ex-racers who still use temperature specific wax.  I am somewhere in between.  BTW, I do know about hot boxing, layering on wax by hardness, etc.  That stuff doesn't apply to this guys question.

Buy a 250 gram bar of universal shop wax for under $14.  Cheap.  And it will penetrate the base OK, sealing it throughout the summer and winter when the skis are in storage.  Then get some graphite wax and use it ONLY for the extreme temperatures.  The graphite's electrostatic properties work well for the super cold and the graphite's properties work well repelling dirty snow (super warm temperatures).  Other than that, just use the universal wax and don't worry about it.  You can rub on the graphite (it is soft) and then drip and iron on your universal wax over it for even distribution.  That way the graphite or molybeum wax will last almost forever.

A freind swears by Hertel's universal "race" wax and claims it works ok in the extreme temperatures by itself, and lasts a very long time (it is hard).  I haven't tried it and won't until I go through a ton of wax I bought for cheap a few years ago. 

The wax techs on the WC will put a 5 or 6 layer base of wax on a ski before it goes on the snow.  That is absolutely not necessary for recreational skiers. If you have the time, why not?    But you will be fine if you just use a quality universal or soft wax and iron it in.  The bases will be protected enough using a universal wax. A soft base prep wax is better, but a universal wax will work just fine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkers View Post

im looking to start waxing and need a question answered concerning wax. i have 6 pairs of skis and 2 snowboards to wax, upstate NY skiing, no racing, just rec skiing. all the skis and boards are new, and have only been skied on once, and some havent been skied on at all. I looked at the hydrocarbon all temp wax, but it says not for base cleaning or conditioning, use red or green wax for cleaning/conditioning.  is this wax ok being the skis have only been skied on once? im not sure about what the temps will be or anything like that, will this wax be ok or not? if not, what should i use? the red or green are to be used after the skis have been skied on a few times?   sorry for all the dumb questions, thank you again for all the help

Edited by quant2325 - 11/6/09 at 10:43pm
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post


Buy a 250 gram bar of universal shop wax for under $14.  Cheap.  And it will penetrate the base OK, sealing it throughout the summer and winter when the skis are in storage.  Then get some graphite wax and use it ONLY for the extreme temperatures.  The graphite's electrostatic properties work well for the super cold and the graphite's properties work well repelling dirty snow (super warm temperatures).  Other than that, just use the universal wax and don't worry about it.  You can rub on the graphite (it is soft) and then drip and iron on your universal wax over it for even distribution.  That way the graphite or molybeum wax will last almost forever.

A freind swears by Hertel's universal "race" wax and claims it works ok in the extreme temperatures by itself, and lasts a very long time (it is hard).  I haven't tried it and won't until I go through a ton of wax I bought for cheap a few years ago. 


I have used both of these combinations in the past.

They work fine, even sometimes great, for most days.

Where they do not work is 'base burn conditions', i.e. fresh manmade snow that isn't allowed to sit as a snow whale for several days.

This is exactly the conditions the OP will face early in the season up until MLK day  in the Northeast.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post
Buy a 250 gram bar of universal shop wax for under $14.  Cheap.

And worse than useless, most of the time, in Upstate NY.  Unwaxed skis with baseburn will be faster...
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

A freind swears by Hertel's universal "race" wax and claims it works ok in the extreme temperatures by itself, and lasts a very long time (it is hard).  
 



 

Ditto. The standard Super HotSauce is pretty good all by itself or mixed with Maplus Universal Green for cold/hard/crusty snow conditions, but the FC 739 race wax is awesome. We're converting over to that for all our skis. The HotSauce is $19 for a HUGE block and the FC 739 is $45, available here.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklgirl View Post

Ditto. The standard Super HotSauce is pretty good all by itself or mixed with Maplus Universal Green for cold/hard/crusty snow conditions, but the FC 739 race wax is awesome. We're converting over to that for all our skis. The HotSauce is $19 for a HUGE block and the FC 739 is $45, available here.

Been using them both since the Moseley era.    Made the mistake of taking them to Whiteface.  Sandpaper.

I'm starting to think that Michigan snow is closer in terms of glide to average Mid-Atlantic snow than to NY-state snow (or Blue Knob snow on a really cold night, for that matter).
Edited by comprex - 11/10/09 at 12:41pm
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