EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Anyone used SKS side bevel tool?
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Anyone used SKS side bevel tool?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I am starting into the world of tuning and have a question about what side bevel guide to get?

After much research, I am leaning on getting the SKS one (see Racewax's link here: http://www.racewax.com/product/RC-3563/SKS_Side_Bevel_Tool_All_Angles.html)

Does anyone have good / bad experience with this tool? It seems to work very similar to Beast side bevel & SVST ones, but comes with all the "shims" already from the get to (for even cheaper price) !

thanks!
post #2 of 12
I have a side of beast pro that was from a batch from a few years ago...the only difference to what they are selling today is that they used to come with two angle plates instead of the one...so I got mine with both 1 and 2 degree plates.  I bought a 3 degree plate seperately.  The reality though is that unless you are going to tune a bunch of different skis with different side edge angles the extra plates are going to just sit around collecting dust.  My entire family skis on Atomics...not because we think they are great, it is because as we upgraded our equipment over the last few years we found good deals on Atomic boards...so all our stuff gets scrubbed using the 3 degree edge plate installed and I only swap it out on the occasion that I am working on a pair of boards for a friend.  I can vouch for both the quality of the Side of beast tool and the great customer service of the shop in bend oregon that puts it out  (Race Place www.ski-racing.com)  .

The only question I would ask about hte FKS one is can you use it without that top clamp?  The side of beast has a clamp as well but the spring loaded knob/bolt that fixes it in place is independant of the knobs/bolts that hold the plates in place so there is no worries about having to keep the plates aligned when swapping out files and stones.  But I cant tell from the pic in your link if this is an issue with the FKS...they do seem to make some nice stuff too,

I can also vouch that Mark at Racewax.com provides great customer service too.  Either site you buy from you are making a good investment in quality customer service.

-Z
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Zohan,

Thanks for the response... Marc at Racewax was definitely helpful in explaining things and I have just gone ahead in ordering the SKS side bevel guide (amont other things) from him.

I do plan to tune both my own and my daughter's skis. My young one is 7 so I think I need to put a little less bevel (1-1.5deg?) on hers than mine. Hence, find it attractive to get all the different plates in one shot.

I don't quite follow your question on "keep the plates aligned" - I thought the top plate is there only to help secure the file/stone against the "shim" underneath? So as long as it is flat against the shim, there's no additional alignment needed?
post #4 of 12
The SKS is probably a lot like the Holmenkol tool that I have. The plates have a series of small pegs and holes to align them together, and to the tool, and that one thumscrew tightens in all up. The Beast has two thumscrews that tightly fix the angled plate to the tool, and then a third that tightens the top plate in place, holding the file or diamond stone tightly. You can use the Beast tool without the top plate, if desired.

Sounds like a good choice, in terms of versatility. One thing that may not have been mentioned is that you can use ALL of those plates together, and get 7* plus of bevel. That will enable you to pull the sidewalls, using that tool, with a short Panzar file, and save the need for a sidewall tool. That's really all that I use that Holmenkol tool for.

Sounds like a good choice. Nice.
post #5 of 12
whats the diff. between this and the Ski Visions base and edge tool? im new to all this so excuse the questions, trying to learn and i want to purchase only what i need to get started you know, thanks
post #6 of 12
Possibly useless observations, as they're based exclusively on the web-site picture and description of the SKS tool:

- It looks like the shims are plastic? Less accurate and robust than aluminum.

- I'd generally be more fond of using a simple spring clamp, instead of that screw clamp. It's quicker and more flexible to use. Also there's a possibility that the screw clamp doesn't hold the file or stone down to the shim properly, because the angle of the clamp-plate doesn't match the angle of the shim.

- I'm not sure what the point of the teflon skids is. Metal slides fine, doesn't wear, and doesn't have any corners.

- As already mentioned, consider how many angles you're really going to need. If you're just going to use two (say 1 and 3 degrees), you can accomplish what you need with a 1-degree tool and a 2-degree shim. The SVST tool with one shim prices out about the same as that tool.
post #7 of 12
I've used a variety of aluminum edge tools over the years and teflon sliders are a nice upgrade.  Especially when using lubricants, teflon works much, much better than bare aluminum.   With respect to the clamp, I think if you actually tried the tool you'd find the concern you raise is addressed in the design fairly simply and effectively.  Maybe not quite as quick as a simple spring clamp, but those have a bunch of their own faults. 
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobieboy View Post

Zohan,

Thanks for the response... Marc at Racewax was definitely helpful in explaining things and I have just gone ahead in ordering the SKS side bevel guide (amont other things) from him.

I do plan to tune both my own and my daughter's skis. My young one is 7 so I think I need to put a little less bevel (1-1.5deg?) on hers than mine. Hence, find it attractive to get all the different plates in one shot.

I don't quite follow your question on "keep the plates aligned" - I thought the top plate is there only to help secure the file/stone against the "shim" underneath? So as long as it is flat against the shim, there's no additional alignment needed?

I wouldn't go crazy changing the bevel of your 7 year old's skis unless she is getting into competitive skiing or the edges are 0/0.  My kids were 7 and 9 years of age last year.  My 9 year old was making the transition from snow plowing to parallel turns because she desperately wants to earn her poles.  My younger one, who has much less fear on the hill will snow plow down just about anything.  I have left the factory bevels alone and just sharpen them after every couple of times out.  As stated in my previous post they are atomics and atomics are factory tuned to 1degree base / 3 degree side.  Snow plowing does however seem to dull the crap out of the edges and my 9 year old's attempt at parallel turning was often better on newly sharpened edges.  Ensuring your daughters edges are sharp and free of burrs will most likely pay bigger dividens for her skiing than changing the side edge bevel.

-z
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zohan View Post




I wouldn't go crazy changing the bevel of your 7 year old's skis unless she is getting into competitive skiing or the edges are 0/0.  My kids were 7 and 9 years of age last year.  My 9 year old was making the transition from snow plowing to parallel turns because she desperately wants to earn her poles.  My younger one, who has much less fear on the hill will snow plow down just about anything.  I have left the factory bevels alone and just sharpen them after every couple of times out.  As stated in my previous post they are atomics and atomics are factory tuned to 1degree base / 3 degree side.  Snow plowing does however seem to dull the crap out of the edges and my 9 year old's attempt at parallel turning was often better on newly sharpened edges.  Ensuring your daughters edges are sharp and free of burrs will most likely pay bigger dividens for her skiing than changing the side edge bevel.

-z
 
My original intent was to not having to send their skis out to the shop if I can do a "simple" sharpening of the edge for the reason you mentioned (being 7 year old). But I'd still need to assume an angle using the tool?

Having said that, she'll be inheriting her bigger (9 year old) sister's atomic so can I assume 3 degree is the factory number? These are SL-9's. My older one is in the competitive program so that's another incentive to start learning how to tune... as her coach asked me to in a subtle way last year .
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobieboy View Post

My original intent was to not having to send their skis out to the shop if I can do a "simple" sharpening of the edge for the reason you mentioned (being 7 year old). But I'd still need to assume an angle using the tool?

Having said that, she'll be inheriting her bigger (9 year old) sister's atomic so can I assume 3 degree is the factory number? These are SL-9's. My older one is in the competitive program so that's another incentive to start learning how to tune... as her coach asked me to in a subtle way last year .

FWIW, when I bumped my kid's side angle from a 1° to a 3°, his confidence soared due to the grippier edge. He went from a skidder to a carver. Now when I ask him if he wants it less, he won't let me. I might do it anyway and put grip wax on his bases to mess with him and so I can keep up.......but that would be just wrong.
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobieboy View Post



My original intent was to not having to send their skis out to the shop if I can do a "simple" sharpening of the edge for the reason you mentioned (being 7 year old). But I'd still need to assume an angle using the tool?

Having said that, she'll be inheriting her bigger (9 year old) sister's atomic so can I assume 3 degree is the factory number? These are SL-9's. My older one is in the competitive program so that's another incentive to start learning how to tune... as her coach asked me to in a subtle way last year .

 

Atomics are factory tuned to 1* base and 3* side...from my conversation with the company last year that is true for their youth skis as well.  As long as the Atomics your daughter will inherit have not had their edge bevels altered you should be able to set up your side edge angle guide for 3* and be good to go.

The biggest thing about tuning is having the nerve to put tools to your boards.  Once you get past that you will quickly figure out the various processes and adopt/adapt them to suite your own personal needs and style.  Other than burning your bases/causing a delamination problem with your iron, there is not much that you can do to mess up your boards that a good shop couldn't fix.  Mind you though, you could do permanent damage to your skiis with tuning tools  but you would have to ignore alot of apparent damage to get to the point that the skiis are irrepairable.

Good luck with your tuning endeavors.

-Z
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

 I might do it anyway and put grip wax on his bases to mess with him and so I can keep up.......but that would be just wrong.
 

Now that's the great idea that I should try... just to keep up I didn't know tuning can be this much fun even before I begin
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Anyone used SKS side bevel tool?