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Did I pay too much for my new package?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
So, for the last few years, I have been skiing on some older Atomic Carv 6-18 w/ (even older) Look 6.0 bindings; i finally decided to upgrade my gear at the annual ski swap that is happened this weekend.   After shopping around a bit, I found a new pair of Stockli Laser SC (2008 model) with Marker Titanium 13.0 bindings (which thankfully fit my boots perfectly). Specifically, I went for them because I tend to stick to the trails, and like a mix of speed and turning (lots of blue, and a black or two); i do occasionally go off trail, but not too much.  If anyone wants comment if they think this might be the right solution, feel free to comment.

Anyway, in the end, i got everything brand new for $620.  I know Stockli's are hand made and nice, but I am having trouble finding retail prices for the equipment.  IN terms of cost, this was quite a stretch for me, but i figured I would make use of them for several years, so i could justify it..

Thanks for any advice!
post #2 of 20
Only you can answer that. What are the Stockli's worth to you?

You can find similar skis in this performance range from last year for a lot cheaper. Stockli is a very expensive brand, though, and you don't see a lot of their skis from prior years with big discounts. They just don't make enough of them for there to be a lot of surplus.

The bindings fit your boots perfectly??? Troll alert?  

If this is for real, I wouldn't take the Laser off-trail unless you are real experienced and/or have made sure that you health insurance policy is up-to-date.
post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post

Only you can answer that. What are the Stockli's worth to you?

You can find similar skis in this performance range from last year for a lot cheaper. Stockli is a very expensive brand, though, and you don't see a lot of their skis from prior years with big discounts. They just don't make enough of them for there to be a lot of surplus.

The bindings fit your boots perfectly??? Troll alert?  

If this is for real, I wouldn't take the Laser off-trail unless you are real experienced and/or have made sure that you health insurance policy is up-to-date.

Hmmm.. I didn't mean to come off the wrong way; I am certainly not trolling.  Specifically, with the bindings, i had to move the adjustments a bit as it was set for 27 boots (and I am 28); but I was simply meaning I didn't have to remount anything.

Anyway, I am interested in your comment about the off-trail warning; could you elaborate more? I don't normally go far off trail, but I do enjoy going off to the side form time to time to catch a bump or two.

As far as them being worth it - having not skied on them yet, i guess i can't say that.  I know they should be a huge upgrade from what I was using, but how much I will get out of them, I am not sure.  What I was just hoping, is that I wasn't taken for a ride, and that I paid more than what a slightly "older" model is worth, thats all..
post #4 of 20
I guess my troll radar isn't as sensitive as yours (possibly explained by the difference in post counts :) ) so I'll bite too.

As mentioned by the previous post, do your boots fit correctly?  There are a variety of settings for a binding where your boot will still fit in but not be adjusted correctly for forward pressure.  If you have some idea what I'm talking about, you can try to read the setting yourself from the sides of the bindings.  There are shop manuals that help finding this.  Much easier, though, is just taking them into the shop to get them fitted to your boot and having the bindings tested.  This process is pretty inexpensive (~$25) as long as your bindings don't need to be remounted.  So look into this.

As for Stöckli, I don't know much about them except they are expensive.  Generally well reviewed, but I'd hope so for the prices.

What is the problem that you need a solution for?  Getting skis?  That's fun!  So drop your buyers remorse and make sure you have the skills to take full advantage of the skis.  Almost ready ...
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by evonitzer View Post

I guess my troll radar isn't as sensitive as yours (possibly explained by the difference in post counts :) ) so I'll bite too.

As mentioned by the previous post, do your boots fit correctly?  There are a variety of settings for a binding where your boot will still fit in but not be adjusted correctly for forward pressure.  If you have some idea what I'm talking about, you can try to read the setting yourself from the sides of the bindings.  There are shop manuals that help finding this.  Much easier, though, is just taking them into the shop to get them fitted to your boot and having the bindings tested.  This process is pretty inexpensive (~$25) as long as your bindings don't need to be remounted.  So look into this.

As for Stöckli, I don't know much about them except they are expensive.  Generally well reviewed, but I'd hope so for the prices.

What is the problem that you need a solution for?  Getting skis?  That's fun!  So drop your buyers remorse and make sure you have the skills to take full advantage of the skis.  Almost ready ...

I guess this forum must see alot of troll posts, though I can happily say I am not one!

After adjusting the distance between the bindings, the boots fit correctly there, but i will get my retention settings set somewhere professionally.

As for the problem I was looking to fix - i figured that my current skis were starting to get outdated, and that I could make some real personal progress by upgrading to something better.  Though, I am sure as soon as it snows here in New Mexico, any buyer's remorse will disappear quickly.. :)
post #6 of 20
 $620 for a new pair of Stockli SC is a great deal. The ski alone retails for over $900 (suggested retail last season was $1139), the binding is worth upwards of $189 new...

but any flat ski with the binding mounted on it is no longer new, it is used even if it wasn't used. You got a great deal on a pair of Stocklis, they aren't 'new' but it's still a very, very good deal.

enjoy them this winter.
post #7 of 20
Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but an Atomic 6.18 is a pretty soft ski (the six represents the flex, and Atomic Beta Carves go up to 11 I believe), which is designed for intermediate skiers developing carving skills.

The Stockli Laser SC is a high performance carving ski, is geared for advanced to expert skiers, and in comparison to the 6.18 is really quite stiff. I don't know what level of skill you are madcat207, but you've traded up from a Toyota Corolla to a Lamborghini Gallardo.
post #8 of 20
Does any of this matter?  You already bought the skis, didn't you?
post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

 $620 for a new pair of Stockli SC is a great deal. The ski alone retails for over $900 (suggested retail last season was $1139), the binding is worth upwards of $189 new...

but any flat ski with the binding mounted on it is no longer new, it is used even if it wasn't used. You got a great deal on a pair of Stocklis, they aren't 'new' but it's still a very, very good deal.

enjoy them this winter.

That is in line with what a dealer said (i was just brought up to sometimes doubt the sales pitch), so I feel better there. I guess i don't care what they are defined as - they are new enough to me (not skied on).


Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but an Atomic 6.18 is a pretty soft ski (the six represents the flex, and Atomic Beta Carves go up to 11 I believe), which is designed for intermediate skiers developing carving skills.

The Stockli Laser SC is a high performance carving ski, is geared for advanced to expert skiers, and in comparison to the 6.18 is really quite stiff. I don't know what level of skill you are madcat207, but you've traded up from a Toyota Corolla to a Lamborghini Gallardo.

In terms of skill, i can confidently handle most any blue, and am working into blacks (i know, probably well below the average demographic here, but..).  In terms of enjoyment, I like going as fast as I can (when I can), otherwise taking terrain that challenges me turn-wise. At this point, I felt like the Atomics were holding me back, and after alot of discussing with a few people, this is what was generally suggested to me based off what I told them about myself.



Quote:
Originally Posted by bob4snow View Post

Does any of this matter?  You already bought the skis, didn't you?

Yeah, that is true, it is already purchased.  It is just the silly part of me that feels better knowing that what I got wasn't a rip.  I guess the more important issue now is that I know what I am getting into, and what I can really expect when i hit the slopes.
post #10 of 20
Madcat,

SWEEETT!! Great ski at a very good price.

I don't have a pair, but have skied them several times. It sounds to me like you're looking for a ski to take you to the next level. You found it!! They are so wonderfully responsive and precise. However, if you get back on them they will let you know it. Stay in command.

I promise that you will be grinning ear to ear after the first run!

Ken
post #11 of 20
Quote:


In terms of skill, i can confidently handle most any blue, and am working into blacks (i know, probably well below the average demographic here, but..).  In terms of enjoyment, I like going as fast as I can (when I can), otherwise taking terrain that challenges me turn-wise. At this point, I felt like the Atomics were holding me back, and after alot of discussing with a few people, this is what was generally suggested to me based off what I told them about myself.


 

I would say that you have alotta ski there.  It is a very high performance ski and it likes precession.  But for speed and edge hold you will have an exceptional tool to work with.

Follwo up and let us know.
post #12 of 20
You didn't mention length and your height and weight.  That could be a big factor.

Stockli is one of the finest skis available and I would love a pair, seriously top of the line.
post #13 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenE View Post

Madcat,

SWEEETT!! Great ski at a very good price.

I don't have a pair, but have skied them several times. It sounds to me like you're looking for a ski to take you to the next level. You found it!! They are so wonderfully responsive and precise. However, if you get back on them they will let you know it. Stay in command.

I promise that you will be grinning ear to ear after the first run!

Ken

Ken -

I know no matter what, come the first run of the season, I will be grinning like mad.  I was more than ready for the season, but these really boosted my excitement. Increased response really sound good; it is something i feel like the Atomics lack.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post




I would say that you have alotta ski there.  It is a very high performance ski and it likes precession.  But for speed and edge hold you will have an exceptional tool to work with.

Follwo up and let us know.

I promise, as soon as I can get out, i will post a follow-up (and a full review, for anyone who is interested).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post

You didn't mention length and your height and weight.  That could be a big factor.

Stockli is one of the finest skis available and I would love a pair, seriously top of the line.

Ah, i should have thought of that. My previous skis were 160cm, and these new ones are 170; the increase in length was suggested due to my bulk (5'7", ~270 (not all fat though.. ) and the way i like to ski.  I don't think they are too long, but I know there will be some adjustment time for sure.
post #14 of 20
I have a pair of Stocklis that I ski a few times a year,wonderful skis. Get ready to be impressed. No slacking on those skis.
post #15 of 20
Years ago, Ski magazine ran a test, where two groups of skiers took a week of lessons, one on "appropriate gear", one on "too much ski".  The class on the high end gear did better.  You got some top notch stuff....get out and use it!   I think you will not regret it. 
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

Years ago, Ski magazine ran a test, where two groups of skiers took a week of lessons, one on "appropriate gear", one on "too much ski".  The class on the high end gear did better.  You got some top notch stuff....get out and use it!   I think you will not regret it. 
I did not know of that test but it makes sense.
Now, if the OP takes this ski and gets a couple lessons.........Priceless!
post #17 of 20
I would highly recommend bringing your skis and bindings to an authorized dealer to have them adjusted and calibrated....
post #18 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

I have a pair of Stocklis that I ski a few times a year,wonderful skis. Get ready to be impressed. No slacking on those skis.

Sounds good to me. Admittedly, for the time being, they will be the only skis i use, so I guess I better really love them.


Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

Years ago, Ski magazine ran a test, where two groups of skiers took a week of lessons, one on "appropriate gear", one on "too much ski".  The class on the high end gear did better.  You got some top notch stuff....get out and use it!   I think you will not regret it. 

That makes sense; when you aren't held back by your gear, you have more room to learn and improve. And I guess I am really making a change from appropriate to too much.. heh.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post



I did not know of that test but it makes sense.
Now, if the OP takes this ski and gets a couple lessons.........Priceless!
 

Ah hey, you are never too old or good to get lessons.  I know there is still alot to learn for me at least ( i took some "advanced" lessons with the better skiers in my family, and learned alot still).


Quote:
Originally Posted by BurgMan View Post

I would highly recommend bringing your skis and bindings to an authorized dealer to have them adjusted and calibrated....

Your recommendation is completely agreed with; $20-$30 is more than worth it to know that i will be properly setup.
post #19 of 20
Madcat,
Congrats on your ski purchase!  For $620.00 skis and bindings, you got a very good deal, if in fact they have never been skied! 

At your weight, you will not be overpowered by the Stockli Laser SC in 170 cm.  These skis have Stockli's ISO Core and in my experience(own 4 pairs with ISO Core), anything with this core is very easy to ski but so very responsive. They will make you a better skier but you need to stay centered on these skis and no back seat driving.

Do yourself a favor and have the boot and binding situation checked by a certified Marker shop.
post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mohrgan View Post

Madcat,
Congrats on your ski purchase!  For $620.00 skis and bindings, you got a very good deal, if in fact they have never been skied! 

At your weight, you will not be overpowered by the Stockli Laser SC in 170 cm.  These skis have Stockli's ISO Core and in my experience(own 4 pairs with ISO Core), anything with this core is very easy to ski but so very responsive. They will make you a better skier but you need to stay centered on these skis and no back seat driving.

Do yourself a favor and have the boot and binding situation checked by a certified Marker shop.

While i guess i cant prove it, i certainly cannot imagine the skis and bindings looking any newer; the bottom is completely mint, as are the tops.  The bindings don't have any scratches from mounting boots... all in all, it is new enough for me. :)

The good new is, is that my favorite shop around here is an authorized Marker dealer, so they should have no problems checking the settings.
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