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Do you teach a braking wedge to your beginners? - Page 2

post #31 of 36
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by nolobolono:
wail (how do you spell that word?) <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Whale (as in spank) would be correct slang in that situation I believe.
ex. "Dude...did you see him whale on that guy??"

Wail is synonymous with 'rockin' (but specific to 'hair band' performance)
ex. "She Wails!"(Waynes World Quote # 346)

I agree wholeheartedly with nolo's observations, but I saw a 4 year old last year who whales everything parallel. It was crazy. I even saw him in the park going off the kickers with the teenagers! That kid was definitely an exception. I wish I could have seen him develop.

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ December 06, 2001 09:27 PM: Message edited 2 times, by Roto ]</font>
post #32 of 36
This is interesting. a good deal of the Sports medicine research nowadays talks about the fact that we know how to condition for exceleration, but not deceleration. But in skiing, people are still debating the best method of deceleration. Hmmm
post #33 of 36
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Lisamarie:
This is interesting. a good deal of the Sports medicine research nowadays talks about the fact that we know how to condition for exceleration, but not deceleration. But in skiing, people are still debating the best method of deceleration. Hmmm<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I agree with your observation, and offer my only words of wisdom on the topic of "Exceleration and Deceleration"

SPEED IS GOOD IT IS THE SUDDEN STOP THAT KILLS YA!
post #34 of 36
Yes. Gliding wedge to a breaking wedge and also a turn to a stop.

It saves a pile of money on fence repairs.
post #35 of 36
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by SnoKarver:
TomB, your confusion is understandable. The "Phantom Drag" method is what RickH is mentioning, and it's really neat...

... It's different, but it works. I can phantom drag real slowly sideways down a very icy and steep slope... if I want to...
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I understand the movement (I have been following the HH web site from its beginning), but it is hardly the answer for a beginner to slowing down on a steep icy slope. I don't doubt that a good skier can do it, but please don't tell me that the downhill ski is flatned. Why the heck would I struggle with draging the uphill ski to slow down, while making a forced move to flatten my downhill ski (when braking is the goal). Sorry, but I simply don't buy these "forced" moves that try to justify PMTS in all situations.

For gliding and somewhat controlling speed, it is OK, but it is no better or worse than doing with 2 feet. The obsession of using the the inside foot takes away from the PMTS's good intentions. :
post #36 of 36
To add to TomB's post:

<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR> The obsession of using the the inside foot takes away from the PMTS's good intentions.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
RickH, I can't understand. If you teach this stuff, how could you possibly miscontrue something like the phantom drag. It is clearly to allow the beginner or anyone else to eliminate the wedge by getting the feeling of brushing the inside (light) ski from the big toe edge to the little toe edge and progressively tipping that inside ski to biomechanically allow the the kinetic chain to result in more outski ski edge engagement. Whether it's boots only and standing on flat terrain (I've seen the instructional videos) or skis gliding on a green. I doubt HH intended it to be used in any way shape or form as a BRAKE! I wish he could see your posts. He would be quite embarassed that you represent him. Tipping the uphill/inside ski more and more progressively will cause the downhill ski to have more edge angle and then more carving considering everything else is o.k. But to keep the downhill ski flat intentionally as you tip the inside ski for some sort of speed control???? That goes against the biomechanics chain that you guys base your whole theory on. The purpose of tipping the inside ski is to get the outside or wieghted ski to edge and engage.. is it not? All without having to think about the outside ski at all and without having to learn and refine the skill of independent steering.

BTW, I would like to point out just a small point of hypocrasy on HH's part. Don't get me wrong, I love watch HH ski. I watch his video and see him in others, but I have yet to see HH carve slow short radius turns at slow speeds without any independent steering. I can name examples in his video but frankly, as many of you are probably exhausted with the whole HH and PMTS saga, I am as well!! But I would like to say that I have no repect for any instructor who throws all logic and physics out the window to try to tie everything back to their mode of instruction even though it makes no sense at all. Makes for good debate though.
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