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New driver go...BOOM!

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
 I picked up a new driver this week, my first new piece of golf gear in about 4 years....I've never been one to change gear much (in golf). I replace my Callaway 360CC 10 deg Big Bertha with a Nike Sumo squarehead 460cc 10.5 deg. The first time i hit this it was like an explosion...BOOM! I never heard a club so loud. Besides the noise, I could not miss hit a ball (I am sure that will change) and to went a good 20-25 yards farther than my old club that I brought with me for comparison. Are the new 3 and 5 woods that much different now then they were 5-6 years ago? If so, I will need to do some shopping in the spring. 
post #2 of 20
I've spent app. $600 in new golf equipment this year. I've had more lower scores this season but on the other side, my scores have been less consistant. Results? My handicap is the same as last year within a few percentage points.

So Phil, the excitement is short lived and you'd  be better served using the money you'd spend on fairway woods and hybrids for ski equipment.
post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
 It was 83.00 (shipped) from Ebay..but I hear what you are saying. I will say it was worth it just for the feel...and sound 

I am using a Callaway Steelhead 5 wood and no 3 wood in the bag. I might look to pick up the Nike 3 and 5 from this Sumo line. As far as clubs, I am using Hybrids for my long irons. 
post #4 of 20
 I sincerely need a better driver than what I have.  Considered the Squarehead but wanted to try one first.
Maybe it will be on my wish list come spring...
post #5 of 20
Golf gear pricing is kind of like ski gear, with the last year and end of year pricing.  If you are contemplating some new clubs this is a very good time to buy in ski country. 

Phil the 3 and 5 woods are as radically different, and easy to hit as the driver but probably not as dramatically loud.  If you don't have one in your bag yet get a hybrid, they call them rescue clubs for a reason.
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

Golf gear pricing is kind of like ski gear, with the last year and end of year pricing.  If you are contemplating some new clubs this is a very good time to buy in ski country. 

Phil the 3 and 5 woods are as radically different, and easy to hit as the driver but probably not as dramatically loud.  If you don't have one in your bag yet get a hybrid, they call them rescue clubs for a reason.

As posted, I have a 18 and 22 deg rescues that I put in to replace my 3,4,5 Irons. I will look for new 3 & 5 woods. 
post #7 of 20
Got a chuckle out of this thread. I think I got you beat on changing golf gear. I thought it was somewhat 'life changing' to acquire a (6 or 7 year old?) 8° Steelhead III driver which added 20 to 30 yards to drives compared with my ole knock-off driver and somewhat equal or better to others with current drivers. I loved the action and sound off the club face, along with, of course, more distance. Until I started thinking, I was hitting consistently. Now I can see the advantage of the larger clubs and sweet spots.

If you get rid of the 3 wood (and maybe 5 wood), please give a shout. Ideally, I'm looking for a Steelhead III fairway 3 with the same shaft and flex as the driver, however.
post #8 of 20
Square clubs are easier to hit consitently. I love my new Nike SQ Dymo2 because it's consistent and long. I also have a Ping V2 rapture that's even stupidly longer, but the misses are much worse than the Nike. I'm alternating between the clubs depending on the course and conditions.

When I demo'd the Nike 3 wood this year, the rep looked at my old Nike T60 3 wood and said - "Ah! the blue flu!" (implication - as one of the early clubs made by Nike - they learned a lot after they made it). It showed in the demos. The square 3 wood was just as stupid straight as the driver. The tradional 3 wood was very easy to work right or left. But in fairway woods, as in drivers, the shaft is as or more important than the head.
post #9 of 20
That set of original Steelhead 3 and 5 are still looking for a good home.
post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post

Square clubs are easier to hit consitently. I love my new Nike SQ Dymo2 because it's consistent and long. I also have a Ping V2 rapture that's even stupidly longer, but the misses are much worse than the Nike. I'm alternating between the clubs depending on the course and conditions.

When I demo'd the Nike 3 wood this year, the rep looked at my old Nike T60 3 wood and said - "Ah! the blue flu!" (implication - as one of the early clubs made by Nike - they learned a lot after they made it). It showed in the demos. The square 3 wood was just as stupid straight as the driver. The tradional 3 wood was very easy to work right or left. But in fairway woods, as in drivers, the shaft is as or more important than the head.

You sold me. I will pick up a 3 and 5 over the next couple of months re replace my Steelhead 5. 

I am using a regular flex shaft. 
post #11 of 20
I spent probably $700 this past year upgrading my clubs, a new IQ 9 degree driver, a new 7 and 9 woods to replace older fairway woods and a new putter. Although my game is improved somewhat, my handicap has remained a 7. So, to access if all these purchases were worth it? I'd have to say in hindsight, no.

As in skiing equipment, we buy new technology in hopes of some miricle cure for some little quirk and it always comes down to personal talent. I play with a man who still uses a Briarwood driver from the sixties who consistantly pounds it by me.

Bottom line, if you hit a new driver 10 yards farther, you still must hit that 5 iron to the green. Once you get to the green, you still must read that putt correctly and put the ball in the hole.

JMHO but sports equipment is like cars. Models change to entice buyers. It doesn't mean they are any better than the ones you have. Just newer and cooler to have. As in skis, I skied just as well on my old 201 7sk's. That ripped powder, bumps and ice just as well as the three skis I now use. It's all hype.
post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post

I spent probably $700 this past year upgrading my clubs, a new IQ 9 degree driver, a new 7 and 9 woods to replace older fairway woods and a new putter. Although my game is improved somewhat, my handicap has remained a 7. So, to access if all these purchases were worth it? I'd have to say in hindsight, no.

As in skiing equipment, we buy new technology in hopes of some miricle cure for some little quirk and it always comes down to personal talent. I play with a man who still uses a Briarwood driver from the sixties who consistantly pounds it by me.

Bottom line, if you hit a new driver 10 yards farther, you still must hit that 5 iron to the green. Once you get to the green, you still must read that putt correctly and put the ball in the hole.

JMHO but sports equipment is like cars. Models change to entice buyers. It doesn't mean they are any better than the ones you have. Just newer and cooler to have. As in skis, I skied just as well on my old 201 7sk's. That ripped powder, bumps and ice just as well as the three skis I now use. It's all hype.
Thats just crazy talk. [PUTTING FINGERS IN EARS] I am not listening NAH NAH NAH NAH NAH [/PUTTING FINGERS IN EARS]
post #13 of 20
Ah Phil, I miss you and your personality. We must make some turns this year.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post

I spent probably $700 this past year upgrading my clubs, a new IQ 9 degree driver, a new 7 and 9 woods to replace older fairway woods and a new putter. Although my game is improved somewhat, my handicap has remained a 7. So, to access if all these purchases were worth it? I'd have to say in hindsight, no.

As in skiing equipment, we buy new technology in hopes of some miricle cure for some little quirk and it always comes down to personal talent. I play with a man who still uses a Briarwood driver from the sixties who consistantly pounds it by me.

Bottom line, if you hit a new driver 10 yards farther, you still must hit that 5 iron to the green. Once you get to the green, you still must read that putt correctly and put the ball in the hole.

JMHO but sports equipment is like cars. Models change to entice buyers. It doesn't mean they are any better than the ones you have. Just newer and cooler to have. As in skis, I skied just as well on my old 201 7sk's. That ripped powder, bumps and ice just as well as the three skis I now use. It's all hype.

  SSSShhhh Lars. Compensating drives economies.......and forums.
post #15 of 20
I was a little different in that I bought new irons in the spring, Taylor made R7 Draw models, $250, a good deal.  Replaced my classic 1985 model Ping eye 2's one of the better clubs ever made.  I simply thought the technology had finally moved on enough in irons to make the change.  I have tried in the past, and really didn't hit many other models much better than my pings. 

Well, after a golfing year, I would say somewhat mixed results.  They for sure are longer than my pings, no doubt. And I can indeed hit a draw, something not possible previously.  I would also say they are a little more forgiving, but that is a fine line.  Overall, I am happy to have upgraded for a reasonable cost, but fixing swing issues is still a very valid investment in making your game better, IMO.  I still carry some ancient callaway warbird 3 and a knockoff 5 wood, both with the callaway Memphis 10 shaft in it, which fits my swing to a tee, and of course leads to high confidence in those clubs. 

Golf is a funny game.
post #16 of 20

I'm under the impression the Ping drivers are long. Had a G2 a while back and cracked the face hitting rock balls at the driving range .Went to the SLC PGA show and listened to the Utah long drive champ claim Ping drivers were the longest( ski trip in March and I couldn't take it any more up in LCC hadn't snowed in two weeks and the conditions were crap so went to the golf show one PM). I think I hit my best drives with the G2 reflecting back.

Played golf a couple of weeks ago with my usual golf partner and his brother in law that had a G-10. I hit it on two holes after hitting my driver and was 10-12 yds longer each time. The G-10 had the stock Regular flex shaft. I have a stiff in my drivers and now I'm wondering if maybe a regular might be better for me. There is a fitting place a couple of miles away with a simulator etc. Probably out to get checked out. Kind of like getting your ski boots canted in skiing maybe worth it.

So many variables with golf who knows, might have been the ball, which cracks me up as I like the cheap TopFlite balls my golf snob golf buddy will find and give to me (will only hit a Pro V). Anyway, we were playing the other day and got paired up with a guy that was really a good golfer who hit the snot out of it and in the middle of the round he turns to us and remarks that he was hitting a TopFlite that day and couldn't believe how far he was hitting it.

One thing for sure its the Indian and not the arrow in golf. The equipment is fun and gets better every year but can't overcome bad swing mechanics and a crappy short game.

post #17 of 20
Phil and I linked up (bad pun) on the links for a few holes today. Eve of ski season and it was 70 in Philly. Anyway, I borrowed Phil's new driver on 2 holes. No question, it moves the ball, feels solid and ball flight height was near optimal. But 3 swings is nowhere near enough to come to any conclusions. I was blocking to the right and 2 balls remain on the RR tracks bordering the 7th hole. My regular driver is the previous version of the Nike Sumo and my impression is the newer model is better.

Nike should include ear plugs with the purchase.

I also borrowed Phil's new 3 wood. Years ago, golfers used 3 woods to get height and straighter flight over older style drivers. For some reason, my 3 wood flight remains low and short on new models from Ping, Taylor Made and also Phil's Nike. It's frustrating! But, hey, that's golf.
post #18 of 20
Quote:
I also borrowed Phil's new 3 wood. Years ago, golfers used 3 woods to get height and straighter flight over older style drivers. For some reason, my 3 wood flight remains low and short on new models from Ping, Taylor Made and also Phil's Nike. It's frustrating! But, hey, that's golf.
 

I dropped the 3 wood and went to a Nike 5 wood last year. I think it's a 19 degree loft and the shaft is longer than the old traditional 3 wood. The head is as big as an old three wood. I think the shaft is something like 42 inches. I believe the old standard drivers were 43. The new 13 and 15 degree three woods have more in common with the original TaylorMade metal drivers than they do a persimmon three wood. My best shot with my last three wood may have gone farther than my new five wood but the average with the five wood is just as long and it's easier to hit, particularly from uphill and downhill lies
post #19 of 20
 I wonder if Tigers driver went boom when his wife hit him with it.
post #20 of 20
Actually, it looks like this is what he wasn't good enough at:   
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