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Getting some one to try skiing?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
 So I'm trying to get my older brother to at least give skiing a try. The reasons he gave not to ski? He goes to Berklee College of Music so he keeps telling me that he can't risk breaking any appendage or sprain it. Generally I'd say that he's more likely to do this getting into a car and slamming the door on his hand but that won't work here. Any ideas or is he right in that he shouldn't try skiing?
post #2 of 13
i hate to say it, but your brother might be right on this one.  skiing definitely exposes the old appendages to some risk -- but then again, no risk no reward.  if your brother is willing to give it a try, i'd definitely suggest making sure he gets a beginner lesson, and hooked up with skis set to the appropriate type 1 release settings.  Also, he should watch out for that pesky wrist strap on the poles.  My advice is not to push anyone into taking on more risk than they are comfortable with.
post #3 of 13
I know people who think adrenalin is poison. Some of them tried skiing, not understanding that skiing triggers adrenalin flow. It scared them to death, and they never went back. If your brother is one of these people, he shouldn't ski, but if he likes to get a rush doing slightly hazardous things from time to time, maybe you could talk him into it. Ya gotta be somewhat of an adrenalin junkie to try skiing.
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spookfish View Post

 So I'm trying to get my older brother to at least give skiing a try. The reasons he gave not to ski? He goes to Berklee College of Music so he keeps telling me that he can't risk breaking any appendage or sprain it. Generally I'd say that he's more likely to do this getting into a car and slamming the door on his hand but that won't work here. Any ideas or is he right in that he shouldn't try skiing?
I don't think it's helpful to think about trying to "get him to try skiing." Think about asking him to share the experience with you, and take his concerns into account. What would you be willing to do to help him enter easily (and safely) into skiing? How would you feel if he did injure himself after expressing that as his primary concern (while perhaps not likely, it's certainly possible!)? I know people who have skied for over 40 years without injury and others who were hurt their first day on skis. It's a risk.

What I did when I introduced my then-girlfriend to skiing was to take off my skis and walk in front of her as she was learning to help her overcome her fear of being unable to stop. I did this down one green run at Belleayre back in the day. That was what she needed. Since then she's been hurt more by being run over by others than her own falling down!

Hope this helps...
post #5 of 13
 While I didn't go to Berklee, I have a BA Ed in music and a MMus which I got at the same time I was on ski patrol (at your home mountain, by the way).  Does he work out, play a little basketball, touch football, or do anything else physical?  Does he use a hammer to hang a picture?  Ride a bike?  I'd worry about those activities more than skiing.

I really wonder if this has to do with him worrying about hurting something.  
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the quick responses everyone. I would say he would take ski lessons since that pretty much is the best way to learn as a beginner. If he did hurt himself I wouldn't kill myself because people get hurt doing all kinds of things. I'm pretty sure he'd be taking lessons with my mother as well, and while they did that I'd go get some hard runs in then ski with him the rest of the day. I think the best thing to getting better at skiing is trying to ski with more advanced skiers so I'd push him on difficulty but not too much so that he'd hurt himself. You are correct Sharing the experience is a better way of wording it and thinking about it.

As for an adrenaline junky, not really, he likes doing those things only after he forced to. Ex: roller-coasters, swimming etc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

 While I didn't go to Berklee, I have a BA Ed in music and a MMus which I got at the same time I was on ski patrol (at your home mountain, by the way).  Does he work out, play a little basketball, touch football, or do anything else physical?  Does he use a hammer to hang a picture?  Ride a bike?  I'd worry about those activities more than skiing.

I really wonder if this has to do with him worrying about hurting something.  
I'm pretty sure you are correct, he tends to focus on one thing (in this case skiing) and thinks that he'll get hurt doing it. In all likely hood we are more likely to get in a car accident on the way. Thats pretty cool that you got a BA in music, possibly from Western? (just shooting in the dark on that guess). On a tangent, are the runs at baker longer? Which mountain do you prefer? Maybe some day if you don't mind you could teach me a thing or two at Stevens.

Nonetheless if he ultimately decides to go skiing the other problem that occurs is equipment. Since he'll only be here for 1-2 months. Renting is what I'm guessing.
post #7 of 13
Skiing is a risk sport. But... It is really fun.
post #8 of 13
Well, Ill admit my first time skiing my Mom had to drag me out there kicking and screaming and she put me on rental skis. Well, I took a beginners lesson that day and had a blast. We were out buying my first pair of skis and boots the next week...........her mistake.
post #9 of 13
I'm no instructor but in my experience people who are very fearful and tentative don't get on well with skiing. To progress and enjoy skiing you need a lower fear threshold than these kinds of people and be able to tolerate some amount of risk to be able to push yourself and learn.

It's always hard to imagine how people can't enjoy something we love so much but if you are constantly fearful and scared it becomes easier to understand why some people don't get on with it.
post #10 of 13
From my experience, nearly everyone who has never skied are apprehensive about skiing from a safety standpoint. For many, skiing is often synonymous with 'broken leg'. Also, when discussing skiing with people who show a mild interest, Sony Bono and Kennedy always get mentioned by them somewhere in the conversation. 

If fear of injury is the biggest impediment for them but they have an interest, perhaps showing them your gear, how the bindings work, etc might do somehting to quet the fear. Also, let them know they won't be on race skis, they will be on beginner equipment on small runs. 

Outside of that, many people just don't like the cold or snow. Skiing is also perceived as a cost-prohibitive activity for many. 


 
post #11 of 13
See I was the kid growing up whose parents said "hes never going to make it to the age of 18". I was always a little speed freak.........I guess it was natural for me to love skiing.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post

From my experience, nearly everyone who has never skied are apprehensive about skiing from a safety standpoint. For many, skiing is often synonymous with 'broken leg'. Also, when discussing skiing with people who show a mild interest, Sony Bono and Kennedy always get mentioned by them somewhere in the conversation. 

If fear of injury is the biggest impediment for them but they have an interest, perhaps showing them your gear, how the bindings work, etc might do somehting to quet the fear. Also, let them know they won't be on race skis, they will be on beginner equipment on small runs. 

Outside of that, many people just don't like the cold or snow. Skiing is also perceived as a cost-prohibitive activity for many. 


 

Edited by Ole703 - 11/17/09 at 5:02pm
post #12 of 13
I can definitely understand the guy's concerns. When I was first getting into skiing, I was jamming out a lot with some friends, and we were getting into some really great stuff. I was afraid that I'd bust an arm or a leg and lose out on weeks or months of these jam sessions. It wasn't the Berkelee School of Music, but I was progressing rapidly and having a blast and I didn't want to mess that up. If I were in an academic setting for music, I would've been even more reluctant to go skiing initially.

If someone is truly gifted at music, I can absolutely understand them drawing the line at skiing. Maybe now isn't the best time to push someone into an activity with a fair amount of risk to it.
post #13 of 13
Whatever you do, keep him away from a rope tow.

Rope tows are a degrading experience.  They are wet and cold.  Almost instantly your gloves are soaked and your hands are tired.  Even for me, I find a rope tow a difficult physical endevor.  After just a few times, I'm ready to go home, AND I'm able to ski on the way down.

Even if you have to drive 5 hours, find a hill that has a chair accessing the bunny hill (not a t-bar either) so that your friend may concentrate on skiing and not mastering the rope tow.
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