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I am so cheap ! - Page 2

post #31 of 44
I heard Jackson was becoming kinda' chique, but I had no idea how far things had gotten

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiing-in-Jackson View Post

You can't be good if you don't look good.
 
a guy was skiing on a pair of nice Elans, which I guess he got cheap. He left the hand printed price tag on the skis: $35

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post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post

Yes, but these everday things don't cost hundreds of dollars.

I understand though about the need for storefront shops to have to make a living.  As this sport does attracts many folks with serious amounts of disposable income, they really aren't so concerned with discounts and will continue to visit the shops. It's just that for the frugal(i.e. cheap) among us, we realize that this sport is expensive enough to begin with, many of us will be getting whatever deals we can off the net for the hard goods and apparel. I am just glad I don't have a family to have to outfit -- bejeebers, one could go bankrupt. Skiing is fun but it can be hazardous to the financial health of a middle class family.  In fact, a guy at work said he and his wife might be interested in taking up skiing. I told him don't do it -- like golf, it's addictive, and can clear your wallet out as you get your fix every year.

Prior to the advent of e-commerce on the net, the consumer had no choice but to pony up and pay whatever was on the price tag in the store. One was at the mercy of the local shop and they had us over a barrel. Even discounted gear from the prior year wasn't much of a discount. There was nowhere else to go. Now, deals can be found with a few keystrokes and the storefront shops are offering discounts on the prior years' goods that are often on par with what can be found online.The only deal breaker for cheap folks like me is sales tax -- why pay it if you don't have to? A $500 purchase can be $30 in tax in many states. That's almost a lift ticket.
 

I agree with much of what you are saying here. In the next few years I will be looking at outfitting both my kids and my wife (who skis, but will need/want new gear) to make matters worse I plan on putting my oldest into a Jr. race program (if she wants to). There is no way I could afford this if I did not work in the industry. My other hobby/passion is car racing, again, I work in the industry just so I can afford to participate. Even then I still don't have the money to be a contender, so I settle for just getting out there and having fun. :)
post #33 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDoyal View Post



I agree with much of what you are saying here. In the next few years I will be looking at outfitting both my kids and my wife (who skis, but will need/want new gear) to make matters worse I plan on putting my oldest into a Jr. race program (if she wants to). There is no way I could afford this if I did not work in the industry. My other hobby/passion is car racing, again, I work in the industry just so I can afford to participate. Even then I still don't have the money to be a contender, so I settle for just getting out there and having fun. :)

 

I am geting my fix in now too.

BTW,  I am not trying to disrespect the shops. They are important and need to make a living. I am just talking reality, really. This is a mucho expensive activity and a lot of folks have to do what they can to afford it. Car racing sounds like fun. Why is eveything that is fun to adults so expensive?  
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDoyal View Post

 I love how you guys claim the mark ups are so bad. There are many many things that you buy everyday that have a WAY bigger mark up than ski gear. It's not the mark up, it's the fact that this stuff just cost more than the junk you find at your typical Sport Mart/Dicks/chain store. The best thing, if you don't have to have the most current fashion, is to shop for last years gear. Maybe even give your local shop a chance, before you support a corporate giant like TJ Maxx. Our last years jackets and pants are at 50% off right now, I promise we are not making any money on them.FYI, in the next few years you guys will see less and less close-out gear at places like TJ Maxx. They buy up all the over-runs from the manufacturers, but this year (and last year to an extent) the manufacturers have been producing far fewer extras. Things are pretty much cut to order at this point.


I think some of what your saying is already hitting. I notice my local TJ MAXX had no where near as much stuff as last year. At least this was true about a week ago. Plan on heading there in the next day or two and see if more stuff came in as I was quite shock at the limited supply.

I try to support my local ski shops as much as possible. But its hard to do at times. I see things I want that are like $125 or whatever and then the end of the season tent sale(this year they had a tent set up all summer) its sitting in there for $40.  
post #35 of 44
 I spent too much this season by trying to save. 
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiing-in-Jackson View Post

I enjoy getting new stuff. 

New stuff is cool.  I throw/give away things I don't need when they are shot.  Duct tape is great, but too many people treat it as a fashion assessory. 

Modern gear gives an excellent price/wear ratio, IMHO.  The sh!t is pricey, but it is very nice and will last forever under the needs of the "typical user".  No doubt gloves are the weakest link in the system, as I go through probably two pairs a season.

New gear allows people like you and me to go out and kill it on the mountain.
I enjoy new stuff too.
None of my sub $200 skis came with any noticeable base damage.  Two pair (PEs and CaBrawlers) were $115 brand new in plastic shipping included.   My $30 boots were also brand spankin' new. True, they are Rossis, but I actually like them better than my older, but also purchased "un used" Langes.
post #37 of 44
All my ski clothes were acquired at Sniagrab. I think I paid less than $125 for my whole outfit, from the inside out. One pair of Sniagrab skis for $37.50 and another pair that was two years old for $300, with bindings, from another shop. The only thing I splurged on was boots, since getting boots right is so important is rarely a slam dunk, and even those were end-of-season discounts.

I bought a pair of gloves seven years ago, and then found two more identical pair in a box somewhere that actually worked better, but were slightly beat up. I lost all three somehow two years ago and bought a pair of Scott gloves (Sniagrab again) for $25 and they proved to be too warm for most days after mid-January. Then I found another old pair of somewhat frayed gloves in the pockets of a coat I rarely wear and they have been my main gloves since then. They aren't really ski gloves and no skier in his/her right mind would ever buy them on purpose for that use, but they work perfect. (First time I fall in slush I'll think otherwise)
post #38 of 44
Thread Starter 
Sounds like a good deal. Having fun is what it's all about. Lot's of crossover gear works well. Just because it isn't sold or marketed as ski gear doesn't mean it's not practical. I aggree about boots -- don't want to mess around with those. It's one thing you have to pony up on if you want to have the most fun.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Morrison Claystone View Post

All my ski clothes were acquired at Sniagrab. I think I paid less than $125 for my whole outfit, from the inside out. One pair of Sniagrab skis for $37.50 and another pair that was two years old for $300, with bindings, from another shop. The only thing I splurged on was boots, since getting boots right is so important is rarely a slam dunk, and even those were end-of-season discounts.

I bought a pair of gloves seven years ago, and then found two more identical pair in a box somewhere that actually worked better, but were slightly beat up. I lost all three somehow two years ago and bought a pair of Scott gloves (Sniagrab again) for $25 and they proved to be too warm for most days after mid-January. Then I found another old pair of somewhat frayed gloves in the pockets of a coat I rarely wear and they have been my main gloves since then. They aren't really ski gloves and no skier in his/her right mind would ever buy them on purpose for that use, but they work perfect. (First time I fall in slush I'll think otherwise)
 
post #39 of 44
I stop spending $ on gloves years ago. Now 8 dollar wool/leather,perfect. Just got a Carhart rain jacket,nice. Yes I ski in the rain,whatever.
post #40 of 44
As an instructor who often has to go out and work in absolutely miserable conditions (freezing rain?  Sure, I can teach! ...), it can definitely be worth shelling out for really nice gear.  If you're rarely out in awful conditions, or you can go inside whenever you want to grab something else, you don't need to be nearly as demanding. 

As long as you're willing to give up performance in extreme situations, you can definitely skimp a lot on your ski clothes and they'll still be functional.  And there's a nearly endless supply of high-quality used skis out there.  Like others, I wouldn't cut corners on the boots -- of course, I have fewer choices than others, since I wear a US mens size 17...
post #41 of 44
Thread Starter 
Holy Smokes. Size 17?  What is the mondo size of your boots? How do you find boots? I didn't know there were ski boots that big.
post #42 of 44
I think mine are a 32.5 mondo.

A few companies make a few shells in really big sizes.  Mine are Strolz.  I was lucky that I have a local shop that sells them, and stocks some of the big/hard-to-find sizes.
post #43 of 44
Does he even need skis?
post #44 of 44
 I have a size 33.0 Tecnica in the store, when I unboxed it I was tempted to see if I could use it as a whitewater kayak :)
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