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Powder Skis in the Trees?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I have a pair of Dynastar Exclusive Legend Powder skis that I just love...in powder of course and also in bumps (they seem to be softer).  I've skied with them in the trees too, and thought they were fine.  Then I read a review somewhere that said they were difficult to turn quickly from edge to edge.  The last time I skied in the trees, I kept thinking about that and it was freaking me out!  Is there any reason powder skis wouldn't be good for tree skiing?
post #2 of 10
the danger of reading too many reviews, especially after you've made your choice.

I ride the Legend Pro, so I'll tell you what I think, but you'll still be reading and it could freak you out later.

'Edge to edge' doesn't really apply in powder as you never really engage or hold the edge or rebound off the edge anyway, so just throw out that phrase entirely.

That said, if the trees are tight an easy turning ski is fun. That could mean that the ski is short, or soft, or floaty (wide), or all the above, and throw in rockered. 

OTOH, big turns on a giant face are fun on skis with power and stability. 

You have a bit of both in that ski. Ride and enjoy. Your gear sounds fine. 



Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiFox View Post

I have a pair of Dynastar Exclusive Legend Powder skis that I just love...in powder of course and also in bumps (they seem to be softer).  I've skied with them in the trees too, and thought they were fine.  Then I read a review somewhere that said they were difficult to turn quickly from edge to edge.  The last time I skied in the trees, I kept thinking about that and it was freaking me out!  Is there any reason powder skis wouldn't be good for tree skiing?
post #3 of 10
If it works for you to hell with the reviews :D
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

the danger of reading too many reviews, especially after you've made your choice.

I ride the Legend Pro, so I'll tell you what I think, but you'll still be reading and it could freak you out later.

'Edge to edge' doesn't really apply in powder as you never really engage or hold the edge or rebound off the edge anyway, so just throw out that phrase entirely.

That said, if the trees are tight an easy turning ski is fun. That could mean that the ski is short, or soft, or floaty (wide), or all the above, and throw in rockered. 

OTOH, big turns on a giant face are fun on skis with power and stability. 

You have a bit of both in that ski. Ride and enjoy. Your gear sounds fine. 


 


 

Excellent Advice.

User forums are very helpful, but can really be a Pandora's Box if one isn't careful - Lord knows I've succombed to temptation on a few occasions.
Edited by The Squeaky Wheel - 10/16/09 at 1:34pm
post #5 of 10
I think if you consider that "powder skis" is simply a label, and that your skis don't know they are in the trees, you can answer your own question.  From what you've said you really like the skis in most soft snow conditions and terrain, and I assume therefore they are dependable and predictable, which is exactly what you want for tree skiing.  "Edge to edge" is only an issue on hard snow.  Powder skis tend to be softer, and therefore easier to quickly bend into a turn when needed, which is the first quality I am looking for in a tree ski. They also tend to have softer tails, which means they don't punish you by quickly accelerating in a straight line if you get in the backseat a little.  It sounds to me like you have exactly what you need for tree skiing.

IMO most people are on skis that are too stiff, which actually inhibits their skiing. You appear to have found a ski with a mellow flex that suits your style, so consider yourself lucky and enjoy those trees.
post #6 of 10
I use, and love, my Atomic Powder Plus 165cm in the trees. I'm not trying to get them to carve there, as with 130-110-120 or so sidecut, I'd be making 40m radius turns. Not good.

Bode skied a K2 Four and won races. It was a trure recreational ski at the time but he clearly demonstrated that the features of the ski worked well for racing, too.

Ski what you like and ski them often!

MR
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Excellent, Mudfoot!  I had Solomon X-Screams before I demoed these and I couldn't figure out how to ski in bumps!  Those Solomon's were fine on hard-pack, but in moguls and powder, they sucked!  Once I tried the Dynastars I couldn't believe the difference a ski could make in bumps and powder!
post #8 of 10
Reading reports on the skis you own can be very useful; especially if you want to get another pair for the quiver.
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiFox View Post

Excellent, Mudfoot!  I had Solomon X-Screams before I demoed these and I couldn't figure out how to ski in bumps!  Those Solomon's were fine on hard-pack, but in moguls and powder, they sucked!  Once I tried the Dynastars I couldn't believe the difference a ski could make in bumps and powder!

I am a big fan of soft tailed skis.  For years skis were designed on the racing model, but who whats to accelerate out of a turn, especially in the bumps?  Soft = very forgiving, partcularly in the bumps.  I had a pair of X-Screams and hated them, too stiff in the rear end.  They carved great on hard snow, but required way too much attention the rest of the time.  With a soft ski like a "powder" board you can ooze through the bumps (i.e. Volant Additic's love of Chubbs). In the future I highly recommend "big smile" skis that have an even tip to tail flex, and bend into the shape of a big smile when you push on the middle.  If you choose a softer ski it also allows you use a little longer length,  which adds to stability.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
I was amazed at the difference this ski has made!  I always HATED powder snow...as you probably know if you owned a pair of X-Screams.  You're right...they were great on hard snow and I was always way ahead of everyone else, but in powder snow, they just dove into the bottom and I went right over the tips!  The wider powder skis really do float on top...something I never experienced before.  I was telling my sister about them - she lives in Wisconsin and had X-Screams too.  She went out and rented the Dynastar Legend Exclusive Powder skis and has since bought a pair too!  And I thought the fat ski thing was all hype.
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