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QuiverNot - Page 2

post #31 of 46

For the kids that I work with, the first year K1 racers (11 years old) start using two pairs of skis -- GS and SL.  While it's not strictly required by the rules for K1, it is very strongly encouraged.  Not only can they get better results in training and races with the best ski for each event, but learning to adapt to different equipment is in fact a skill in itself. 

After a season of going back & forth between GS and SL skis, the skill of adapting to different skis is becoming reasonably well established.  By the time they get to K2 (13 & 14) they will comfortably switch between skis even during the same day.  A good handful also have park skis that they adapt easily to after race training is done for the day.

Skiing on different skis doesn't hold back their development, it is part of their development.

post #32 of 46
^^^sounds like a rental shop functioning efficiently. guess the limited locations is the difference, no big omnipresent chains.

It's early season and your endurance is way down. Skiing the morning on a ski that you have to work very hard to get the results. After a while you're beat and the ski is working you. Switch off to a really fun, easy-turning ski and relax, tour around the mountain, rest the legs. Works for me.
post #33 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete View Post

So back in the olden days (last century) how did they manage without all of these different types of skis???

I mean how could they ski in powder with skis that weren't 100mm underfoot and rockered???

That's why we needed skis that were 500 cm long.  Longer skinnier skis with roughly the same surface area...... 





You know I'm joking about the 500 cm right?
post #34 of 46
I saw a classic photo of Tomlinson and his buddy skiing powder in the 40's or so. They were skiing side by side in the shot. They were both in exactly the same position. Their technique was identical. With the equiptment of that era (very long wood skis with bear trap binders), there were not a whole lot of ways to make a turn in powder.You had to ski correct technique, one correct technique. 

Nowadays, not so much. Take your balance, speed, and desire out there and shred. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete View Post

So back in the olden days (last century) how did they manage without all of these different types of skis???

I mean how could they ski in powder with skis that weren't 100mm underfoot and rockered???

I know the question is rhetorical, and still, there is an answer.
Edited by davluri - 10/16/09 at 12:25pm
post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

The operative word in the OP is definitely 'development'. Nothing stated there is wrong for a developing skier. The closing statement:
 


For a developed skier, a quiver is fun.
 

What if you’re an accomplished, developing skier?  Pretty comfortable on pretty hairy terrain then started learning to ski. 

I never considered doing drills.  Just too boring, a waste of my ski time.  Started doing some last year, suspicions confirmed, they weren’t that exciting.  I really enjoyed swapping out skis a few times in the same drill session to feel the difference.  That kept me on the hill longer for sure and I’m glad it did.  Changed my mind on that waste thing.

 

 

 

 

Had a very enjoyable afternoon last year at Mary Jane when I swapped out skis every run on four (iirc) laps of Trestle.  The snow was pretty good and I had a blast ripping it harder and harder each time, really feeling what the ski was doing and relishing the differences.

 

 

 

 

I definitely have a go to ski every year but I do enjoy getting out on a variety of boards.  Ha!  I also try to enjoy the times when I’m on the wrong boards for conditions.

 

 

 

 

As for the OP’s list, four through ten, I enjoy feeling these differences as I swap on the fly and don't feel it takes much time to adjust.  Three, I enjoy the buying, typically don’t sell and transportation isn’t usually a problem for me.  I think having a few pair that you’re comfortable on makes tuning more convenient, especially on the road.  When waxing in a hostel outbuilding I’d rather do four pair once a week than one pair every couple of days.  I’ve done both fairly often.  Two, I don’t see these two areas of focus as mutually exclusive.  One, yeah I could do without the expense but it is thrilling to find a great deal, and I see plenty of benefit on the hill.

 

 

 

 

I have noticed that some pretty good skiers tend to rock one pair 90 – 100% of the time.  Mad props to ‘em but man I can’t wait to get out on my slalom race boards and my rockered pow boards and a few pair in between.

 

post #36 of 46
Is it ski season yet? 

I'll be skiing my 1 ski quiver and enjoying myself once it is
post #37 of 46
I have ONE pair of skis. I ski 4 year old Rossignol Bandit B2's 174 CM 78 mm waist. I have looked into getting some powder skis but can't justify the cost since I live in Alabama and get ~15 days in out west each season. I seem to survive just fine without a 5-ski or however many ski quiver.
post #38 of 46
It's been my observation that soft snow and hard snow require specific skis.

Hard-snow is like pavement, It's two dimensional. Ice-skates work well on hard ice, so do racing and skinny carving skis.

Soft snow is like water. It is a fluid when pressured by the ski. Water skis and surfboards work well in a three dimensional material. So do wide skis and reverse camber skis.

I would hate going back to just one pair of skis. ... I've had multiple skis for 40 years.

Michael
post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete View Post

So back in the olden days (last century) how did they manage without all of these different types of skis???

I mean how could they ski in powder with skis that weren't 100mm underfoot and rockered???

Technique, of course.

With solid technique you can make most any ski do at least an adequate job in almost any conditions. Without solid technique, you can't make the perfect ski for the conditions do squat.

Size of quiver has nothing to do with talent or lack thereof. Ability has nothing to do with what variety of skis you have. Until you have ability there is little or no need for a quiver. With ability you simply have a choice to have variety or not.

MR
post #40 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post




I'm not that much of a golfer, but I've been told that a really GOOD golfer can shoot a very good score with a single club like a 5 iron.

Would the 5 iron be the rough equivalent of an all-mountain ski with about 75 to 80mm underfoot?


Yes re: the golf. 

As far as juniors getting used to sl and GS skis, the point is these kids, who ski much more and are more athletic than the average skier, have to learn to adapt to 2 skis that are not that dissimilar in shape and construction.  A couple years later adapting to ice skis vs soft snow skis, and different bases, again takes time.  If there were no adjustment involved it would be no big deal.  And that's just for race skis.
post #41 of 46
So, that's like 8 different ways of saying skis don't all ski exactly alike, 1 saying you have to wax them and 1 that they're expensive?



The better you are at skiing, the more you notice the difference between two skis, but the less difference it makes. For anyone who "needs" time to adjust to different skis, you might want to spend more time and money getting better at skiing. On the other hand, if you need to buy different skis for every different condition, you might want to spend more time and money getting better at skiing.
post #42 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post




I'm assuming you're skiing on the same run!

Otherwise, all you're experiencing are the different skis, not different run.

No, I said "changing stuff makes you a better skier". Ideally, I would never ski the same run twice.
post #43 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by teledance View Post

 Most days it's one ski but they do different things and it is fun to swap out sometimes, besides who wants just one ski in the quiver.
I can't afford telerod15's method of a new ski for every run, would need a sherpa skiing behind me with the quiver.
For those who can't handle swapping out, go back to the green/blue runs and work that technique.

I was fantasizing about a new pair for every day, not every run, but I like your way of thinking. I can't afford to do either. Sometimes I have one pair of useable skis, sometimes I have only two mismatched skis that aren't broken. That doesn't stop me from skiing or limit the terrain or conditions I will ski. I will ski whatever on whatever. As long as the bindings are free heel, I'm good.
post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post

It's been my observation that soft snow and hard snow require specific skis....
Michael
 

You have been observing the wrong skiers.
post #45 of 46
I enjoy my quiver of one and it is a horrible choice(center mount twin tip) for only having one ski. I ski them everywhere. I plan on doing the local race series this winter on them. There is nothing more fun then beating all the serious guys on "park" skis. I would like to have two pairs of skis, a mogul specific ski and a more all mountain ski with an AT binding. The mogul ski would be used for resort skiing and the other for back country trips. 

If you want to have a large quiver of skis have at it. If you are skiing with me expect no sympathy from me for saying your skiing is lacking because you are on the wrong ski. Picking the wrong ski for conditions is no excuse for poor skiing. I have known multiple people that use their equipment as an excuse for their ability. They convince themselves of this fact also, so rather than working on their skills they are constantly looking for the equipment that will make them better. A good skier will look good/feel good regardless of the equipment they are on. This does not mean that a good skier will not enjoy the benefits of a condition specific ski though.
post #46 of 46
"No one cares that you tele." 

I always have an equipment excuse.
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