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Edge beveling tool again...sorry.

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I'm looking for a side edge beveling guide for my Atomics: a 3* bevel. Something that I can clamp a file/stone to. Are there any with upturned edges on the side (facing the tip/tail of the ski) that slide along the base of the ski...something like this:

\----------/

Sorry to beat this to death again, but any help would be appreciated.
post #2 of 24
Hello, in your neck of the woods,
try www.artechski.com
I don't get the "upturned"
(even with the drawing)
You might also check out www.fktools-us.com
for their products.

[ January 15, 2004, 04:55 PM: Message edited by: John J ]
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
Imagine the tool (with file/diamond stone attached to it). When in use, it slides fore/aft on the base of the ski while sharpening the side edge. I'm worried about the guide taking chunks of base material out of the base of the ski if it has a sharp edge that rests on the base of the ski. Thus the "upturned" ends.
post #4 of 24
Get one of these at 3 degrees and a spring clamp.

web page

I use Moonflex diamond stones with them.

There is no need for the guide to be curved at the ends as the contact point on the guide goes up and over the ski shape.

The file or diamond stone is on the guide at an angle so it goes over the ski shape easily.

You shouldn't be tuning past where the ski makes contact anyway.

Unfortunately there aren't many ski shops in Boston that carry high end ski tools.
post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks...mail order man. I don't buy any of my stuff around here. I've looked at some guides up at Stratton shops (where I do 98% of my skiing) but haven't seen anything that I like.
post #6 of 24
Tognar has good equipment and information.
post #7 of 24
I misunderstood what side being upturned you were talking about.

Don't worry about the guide digging into the base.

The ski should be on it's side in a vice with most of the weight on the top of the guide so it is gliding on the base but without too much pressure.
post #8 of 24
I get it.
If you are ever concerned about a
"sharp" corner on a tool, hit the offending
corner (or edge of tool) with some sandpaper
or a file/then sandpaper.
I do this with some bevel guides, where
I am using the face meant for file or stone
against the base. This because some bevel
guides have such a big cutout for "shavings"
you can't use the smaller stones without
the stones being a bit rocky.
(Example-the "Winning Edge" brand of
side edge guides.)
Hmm.? Is that clear?
post #9 of 24
I just saw a snowboard instr yesterday with a BURTON product... I checked it out thoroughly, and it was a really good edge angle file/stone holder. Increments from 90-89-88-87-86-85. Strong, a little heavier, but really well designed.

It had a significantly larger surface area that would run along the base, so for a novice tuner, much easier to use.

You might want to check it out...

:
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally posted by vail snopro / ric reiter:
I just saw a snowboard instr yesterday with a BURTON product... I checked it out thoroughly, and it was a really good edge angle file/stone holder. Increments from 90-89-88-87-86-85. Strong, a little heavier, but really well designed.

It had a significantly larger surface area that would run along the base, so for a novice tuner, much easier to use.

You might want to check it out...

:
This thing?

Burton File Guide

A basic file guide is really quick for changing stones or files with a clamp but if you only use one I guess that tool looks OK.
post #11 of 24
Yes, this is the same one I saw. I used it for a while to get a feel for it, and it was really nice. The files /stones switch out easily, and so do the angles. Very little to wear out, and well designed. Like I said, just a bit heavier than what I'm used to.

Its pricey, but the guys I was taking to say they can be found for under $40.

I recommend this tool to novice tuners.

:
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally posted by vail snopro / ric reiter:

Its pricey, but the guys I was taking to say they can be found for under $40.

I recommend this tool to novice tuners.

:
If someone is wont to browse fleabay, this tool was actually badged (RED) for 2002, and was the appropriate color. I really liked the Teflon lining on the base side, but the best part by far was the milled 1/4 circle fitting that would allow the variable edge angle.

CP, the one I had in my hand still had the Eastern Boarder (Nashua) sticker on it. Ya just gotta look.

A comparable but lighter unit would be a Ski Man Ergoss

Scalce (or anyone): what are the dimensions of the Moonflex stones?

Also, what do you use for a bevel gauge? Other than SVST's Pro Bevel Meter (which I no longer see on Race-Werks' website) is there any other tool with a direct readout?

[ January 15, 2004, 11:00 PM: Message edited by: comprex ]
post #13 of 24
Some of the higher end guides have wheels that roll along the ski base. Mine is an FK product, and never marks the base in any way.
post #14 of 24
I have an FK tool and I think it does more damage with the wheels then a standard edge guide with a stainless steel plate.
post #15 of 24
Moonflex: 102+mm long 25mm wide 5+mm thick.
If you are thinking of using in a guide that accepts
100mm "stones" there is probably 2+mm of backer
plastic (length) that could be trimmed.
(sanded, filed, ground)
post #16 of 24
Thanks, John J, exactly what I was after.

Scalce, I am not so worried about the base damage, though maybe I should be.

I mostly think it is easier to make sure a plane surface is machined to 90 (or 8x) degrees than it is to align four separate spinning axles in that plane (and make sure they stay that way). Thus, I intuitively believe the non-rolling ones to be more accurate and I would like to prove it by numerical measurement if possible (hence the pro bevel meter query).

Most folks just go by feel-on-the-hill, but I am convinced that that is a fantastic way to encounter "mystery problems", "bugaboos", and irreducible blank walls, or to overspend for the results.

A similar quality control issue is described in this article on wobble/shimmy in BMW motorcycles.

[ January 16, 2004, 11:36 AM: Message edited by: comprex ]
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally posted by comprex:
Thanks, John J, exactly what I was after.

Scalce, I am not so worried about the base damage, though maybe I should be.

I mostly think it is easier to make sure a plane surface is machined to 90 (or 8x) degrees than it is to align four separate spinning axles in that plane (and make sure they stay that way). Thus, I intuitively believe the non-rolling ones to be more accurate and I would like to prove it by numerical measurement if possible.
I agree

I think there is more of a chance of the wheeled guides slipping and being off.
post #18 of 24
Thread Starter 
I'm wondering if the Moonflex diamond stones will fit in the Burton guide. Anyone with both care to comment? Thanks for the help folks.
post #19 of 24
I have the Burton file guide. I got it for $10 at the annual August Factory Sale in Burlington, VT. It works very well, it holds any stone or file I have. The teflon surface has kind of worn off in spots, but the underlying metal doesn't scratch up my bottoms at all, I think it's aluminum. I also have a Swix file guide with little chip files in it, but I have abandoned that in favor of the Burton, which does it all. Changing files and stones is quick and easy.
post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 
I'm going to get the Pro Edge Beveler at 93* for my Atomics. What would you suggest I use to clamp the stone/file to the tool, a cheap spring clamp, or the Pro Edge Beveler Clamp seen <a href=http://www.artechski.com/Merchant2/artechimg/Category/009/09E/WEB/AA405.JPG>here</a>? I'll be using mostly Moonflex stones with this guide.
post #21 of 24
Spring clamp.
post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 
Why? And the 5/8"($1.50) or 1"($3.50) clamp?
post #23 of 24
Pony 3201, it is about four inches long.
I have the SVST clamp, never use it.
I will clean stones and files after each edge
so it is easier to use a spring clamp.
Usually place the clamp coming in off the
front at an angle.
I still use my hands to apply pressure to
the file or stone as i work down the edge.
If you clean the diamond stone after each edge use
it will last longer. Flip it end for end too, so you
are not always using the same area of the stone.
That would be my complaint with using tools
such as the Swix Eactor; that the cutting file
or stone is used only in one area. Dipstik's
guide over at TGR shows the wear lines on his
tool inserts, one line...
So you try to vary the area on your stones for
tuning, you can only do so much because you can't hang
the stone off the angle so much that it is unstable.
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally posted by CP:
I'm going to get the Pro Edge Beveler at 93* for my Atomics. What would you suggest I use to clamp the stone/file to the tool, a cheap spring clamp, or the Pro Edge Beveler Clamp seen <a href=http://www.artechski.com/Merchant2/artechimg/Category/009/09E/WEB/AA405.JPG>here</a>? I'll be using mostly Moonflex stones with this guide.
I use both at the same time. The spring clamp alone does not hold the tool as tightly as I like.
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