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Spray-painting a helmet? - Page 2

post #31 of 53
Of course....

what color you going for?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Downhillin99 View Post

Thanks CROSS for making it simple that's what l really needed. Thanks to everyone else too, but I'm just not going to get that fancy with it.

Do you guys still want me to take pictures? (before and after)
post #32 of 53
Thread Starter 
I'm not sure exactly what color I'm going for. Probably something dark like a dark brown, dark grey, dark green, or maybe just plain black. Hopefully I can make pics but no guarantee.
post #33 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Downhillin99 View Post

Thanks CROSS for making it simple that's what l really needed. Thanks to everyone else too, but I'm just not going to get that fancy with it.

Do you guys still want me to take pictures? (before and after)



Of course! 
post #34 of 53
Thread Starter 
How many coats is a few coats? 2-3 coats? 7-8 coats?

someone please respond
post #35 of 53
I started painting my helmets visor, couldn't find my helmet. I ended up doing around 10 coats. Each coat it looked like I had just misted the visor. I stopped once the old brown color was no longer showing through.

post #36 of 53
The only thing I would add is that I put my rattle cans in a sink of hot water before I start and continue to shake as I paint...actually alcohol causes the shakes so the morning after the party is a good time to paint....oh and with plastics I use 3M scotch pad and tack cloth..no chemicals to loosed liner glues or soften straps etc
2 cents
post #37 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Downhillin99 View Post

I'm not sure exactly what color I'm going for. Probably something dark like a dark brown, dark grey, dark green, or maybe just plain black. Hopefully I can make pics but no guarantee.

Use the Krylon spray paing (Fusion) that's made especially for plastics, and don't worry otherwise about it.  You can even skip sanding it. Don't use primer, go straight for the Krylon.  It will fuse to the plastic and stay put over the season just fine, without hurting anything.  You can buy this paint at any hardware store, Home Depot, Lowes, Walmart, etc. 

I did this with my helmet last year, and the paint lasted the whole season.  I think I'll add another coat this month anyway, just to freshen it up.  To keep the spray from getting on the inside parts of your helmet, you'll need to get some duct tape (or some other real sticky tape) and some plastic (cut up grocery bags, kitchen trash can bags, saran wrap, anything that will keep the paint from the inside) and tape that on the inside parts that might get sprayed by accident.  Or maybe you could stuff some aluminum foil in there.  It's the inside stuff out near the edges that will get hit by the paint, and they just need to be protected.  This is the hardest part - covering up the inside.

In another life I spray-coated some plastic baby dolls.  I didn't use the special paint for plastic, just something in a can that was the right color I wanted.  After several years the plastic started getting very very gooey, along with the color on top.  It degraded.  But this was baby doll plastic, a different kind of substance than the covering for your helmet.  Fusion will work on the helmet plastic.
post #38 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
In another life I spray-coated some plastic baby dolls.  I didn't use the special paint for plastic, just something in a can that was the right color I wanted.  After several years the plastic started getting very very gooey, along with the color on top.  It degraded.  But this was baby doll plastic, a different kind of substance than the covering for your helmet.  Fusion will work on the helmet plastic.

 


I'm not even going to ask!

CJ
post #39 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJO View Post
I'm not even going to ask!
CJ

Artistic License.
post #40 of 53
I found the helmet today and spent sometime painting it.

Masked and ready to go.


After about 5-6 coats of paint. The brown is still showing through.


All done.


post #41 of 53
Thread Starter 
yea, I did mine (really sorry that I forgot to take pics, but its looks like CROSS has me covered). My helmet only took like 4 coats because i was spray painting black on shiny silver.  I can make a scratch on my helmet with my finger nail so I think Im going to put a clear coat on.
CROSS are you going to put a clear coat on?
post #42 of 53

I want to customize my own full faced motorcycle helmet. Its a white bell helmet with a gloss finish.   I was thinking of sanding it down just a little bit to the base paint so I could get the gloss off.  I dont want to damage the helmet though....should I sand it down to the base and if so what kind of base paint spray whould I need to buy and where can I find it?   Then I was gonna sketch my designs to the helmet with a pencil and an erasable marker.  Then once i like the design I would pain it with durable accrylic paint.  But I also want to reapply a gloss finish.  so what kind of gloss spray could i use thats durable and would protect  my designs?

post #43 of 53

hello so im getting a ruroc rg-1 helmet and i was wondering what kind of spray paint i would need to make it bright water proof and that will stay shiney for quiet some time

post #44 of 53

3-4 years old... supposedly helmets should be replaced that often even if they don't have any impacts.

post #45 of 53

Really?  Why?  

 

Plastics in general, along with various interpretations of styrene foam, are relatively inert substances, with sunlight being a major determinant in their decay.  Absent a substantial impact (and I'm definitely on board with that) I'm wondering why I should be changing my expensive helmet after just 3-4 years, or about 75 days of use in my case (sad, I know, but I'm trying to get out more).  Ten seconds worth of google gave me this.

 

In the sun, in a place with lots of ozone pollution, styrofoam falls apart in months. Built into refrigerators and ice chests, sealed away from ozone exposure with anti-oxidants built in, stryrofoam will last for (probably) centuries.  In a landfill styrofoam usually lasts about a decade, depending on moisture and biological history.

 

My head gets warm and stews a little, so I'm happy to go for the landfill example.  "A bit short of ten years" sounds about right for me to get bored with my outdated helmet, and to find some reason to find a new one.

 

Searching a few minutes more, here's another golden find off the back of a search for "when should I replace my ski helmet?"

 

http://www.helmets.org/replace.htm

 

An honest manufacturer: MET

The Italian company MET says in their 2010 catalog:

"We are often asked 'For how long is a helmet safe?', or 'how often should I replace my helmet?”' Until now it has been difficult to find any reliable figures to help answer these queries. MET have now developed a series of tests which are conducted on aged helmets to determine a 'best before' date (unless the helmet is involved in an accident. In that case it should be replaced immediately). The results indicate that, if used properly accordingly to our owner manual, our helmets will still do their job up to eight years after they have been made. Not only is that good news for the customer, it’s great news for the environment!"

 

From the same page I like this.

 

Do you still like wearing it?

Your helmet is of course a piece of wearing apparel as well as a safety appliance. If you consider yourself a stylish rider and your helmet is not as spiffy as the new ones, go for it. There is nothing wrong with wanting to look good, and if you do, fashion is a valid reason to replace a helmet.

 

 

Indeed.

post #46 of 53

 

You have to be very careful when painting helmets.

If the helmet shell is made of glass or carbon fiber laid up with epoxy you can paint away.

If the helmet has a polycarbonate shell painting is a bad idea.

The solvents in the paint will craze the plastic and make it susceptible to fracture under a minor hit.

Other shell materials are in between.

When i paint a helmet I always prime it first with a two part epoxy primer.

This won't attack plastics and provides a great surface for graphics.

Even rattle can primer is good to give easy coverage of the color coats.

Clear coat will add scratch resistance and dppth.

post #47 of 53

Question, I am an artist and my friend who plays hockey wants his helmet painted, I was reading this thread... and it has been informative.  Just checking, would that work with a hockey helmet, and someone said that it could weaken the helmet?? 

post #48 of 53

Question, I am an artist and my friend who plays hockey wants his helmet painted, I was reading this thread... and it has been informative.  Just checking, would that work with a hockey helmet, and someone said that it could weaken the helmet?? 

post #49 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by vbcreative View Post

Question, I am an artist and my friend who plays hockey wants his helmet painted, I was reading this thread... and it has been informative.  Just checking, would that work with a hockey helmet, and someone said that it could weaken the helmet?? 

Depends on the helmet material as I said.
Any painting will void the warranty.
Both Shoei and Arai recommend 5 year replacement because the oils from your scalp can attack the EPS cushioning foam.
post #50 of 53

I'm considering enlisting my somewhat artistic daughter to do an inexpensive custom paint job on my new moderately priced Giro gray helmet.  I'm not too worried if this turns out a disaster that I paint over in all black.  Neither of us have tried painting a ski helmet before, but she is pretty good in other mediums.  I have no talent, but I paid for most of the undergraduate education she just completed last week.  She owes me.  Looking over this thread I think I see three steps to get the "Northern Hemisphere from Space" look that I want below:

 

1. spray or hand paint the entire helmet in dark blue,

2. then hand paint green/brown earth tones  and white cloud swirls with a brush

3. then do final glossy spray or hand painted finish coat

 

What choice of paints would you recommend for above steps and which should be sprayed vs. hand painted?  Any other input welcome including the odds of this turning out fugly.

Thank you.

 

post #51 of 53


For art like that I'd prime then spray with flat white until covered.

Then do your graphics in Sharpie magic marker.

Put some clear over the marker and you are good to go.

Make sure to spray the first clear coat very lightly or the marker will run.

post #52 of 53

So...5 years after the thread was started...anyone here had the guts to do water transfer printing?

 


 

post #53 of 53

I need to know more about that......

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