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Staying centered

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hi again,
First, my apologies for posting the superfeet question here, I didn't think about what I was doing at the time.
My current question, which I know is not that easy to answer is, if I want to ski a steep slope within my ability, and in my effort to get 'over' my skis and face downhill for the turn, how to I keep the skis from 'passing me' and causing me to be sitting back?
Does it make sense?
:
Thanks!
chas
post #2 of 10
Chasboy,

Skiing steeper terrain requires one to think and act more aggressively to stay centered. What that means is that if you don’t think in this aggressive manner, the skies will probably be stationed down the hill farther than you. Not a good thing in steep stuff, IMHO. : I find by being more aggressive starting the turn, really helps in remaining centered through the rest of the turn. Once I make my move down the hill to start the turn, I then feel for the center of my feet. By getting a handle on what my feet are doing, I can get myself centered, or balanced better. I’m not sure about how steep of terrain you are asking your question about. But what I have described above is mostly for very steep terrain, double black. But still the theory is the same in terrain of less pitch. I hope this helps a bit. : ----------Wigs

[ January 11, 2004, 06:21 AM: Message edited by: Wigs ]
post #3 of 10
If I get my bootshanks perpendicular to the terrain at turn initiation, I normally get my center of mass enough ahead that the skis don't get away from me as they accelerate down the fall line, Cheeze1. I guess you could call that aggressive movement if the hill is steep enough.
post #4 of 10
I would examine the way you turn first. Tell us who you turn if you would. One other thing that will help is to use dorsi flexion of the ankle. This will ground your arch to the snow and cause your alignment to change. Your leg will not lock and will be able to continue to turn through the entire turn. You may find pressure control to be a little easier also.
LW
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Ok, guys, I get that I should be aggressive, and there are times that it all shakes out, but it's hard to maintain. I have only skied in Pennsylvania since my 'return' to skiing, and can ski any steepness of slope. I stay away from narrow of any kind, because I need the room.
What is it that you 'feel' when you are making the move? Is it almost like you are going to pitch forward and make a faceplant? I mean, it goes against one's natural tendencies to lean forward when facing downhill, which I know is a big factor. Do you make sure you are 'into the front' of the boots?
Chas
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally posted by chasboy:
<snip> What is it that you 'feel' when you are making the move? Is it almost like you are going to pitch forward and make a faceplant? I mean, it goes against one's natural tendencies to lean forward when facing downhill, which I know is a big factor. Do you make sure you are 'into the front' of the boots?
Chas
I've been working on integrating some of this into my own skiing. I'm by no means "there", but it's getting better. Anyway, a student's view-point.

When I "get it", it never feels like I'm about to face-plant; the only one-word description I can think of is "weightless" or perhaps "floating". Also, I don't like the thought of going "forward", as (in my viewpoint at least) it's not a move to the front of the skis, it a move downhill into the apex of the new turn. I definitely feel the front of my boots, but not in a crushing sense -- more like a "yep, there they are" touch.

I'm sure some of the instructors here can give you a more detailed description of what should actually occur, but from a pure "feeling" perspective, that's what I'm aiming for.

Kevin
post #7 of 10
What I "feel" is equal light pressure on the bottoms of my feet, about as much contact with my boot cuff as I can generate by lifting my toes inside the boots while my legs are suspended by the chairlift, and the sensation of my core (the area behind my bellybutton) flowing toward a point just inside the arc I expect my skis to make as they aim toward downhill. The next instant I'm trying to feel both edges in contact with the snow. Then it's pressure building on the inside edge of the outside foot as I extend the outside leg to maintain contact with the snow while the skis are in the fall line. Finally, I'm trying to relieve pressure on the outside ski to move toward equal weighting for the transition to the next turn. The cuff contact moves around the cuff somewhat depending upon the edge action.
post #8 of 10
Has anybody ever skiied with your boots totally unbuckled or heard of doing this as a way of centering your balance forward and back? I've done it a few times with one of my coaches, one time after taking many runs unbuckled the next run with them buckled again was amazing. It was a floating feeling like somebody else above mentioned. It is kinda dangerous but it definitely helped me that day.
post #9 of 10
Well, I am not an instructor (and don't play one on TV, either), but one thing which helps me get out of the back seat on steeper terrain, in addition to getting a good feel for proper balance and stance on the easy terrain, is to make sure that my hands are always in front of me. Nothing puts you in the back seat like allowing your uphill hand and shoulder to get back up the hill at the completion of the turn. Following your pole touch, think about pushing your uphill hand forward down the hill, keeping both hands in your peripheral vision. If both hands are forward, you will have much less tendancy to over-rotate and you will be positioned to initiate the next turn.
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally posted by Garick:
Has anybody ever skiied with your boots totally unbuckled or heard of doing this as a way of centering your balance forward and back? I've done it a few times with one of my coaches, one time after taking many runs unbuckled the next run with them buckled again was amazing. It was a floating feeling like somebody else above mentioned. It is kinda dangerous but it definitely helped me that day.
No I just got sent rollerblading in summer & made to run around on tele-skis.... parallel skiing but with free heels.... guess what happens if you try to lean on front of boot???

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