New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Grand Teton National Park

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
This week, PBS is showing a Ken Burns series on the National Parks of the USA. It's really absorbing to learn how they were created and the footage has spectacular scenery.

In the third installment last night, they began to describe the creation of Grand Teton National Park. Of the national parks, it holds a special meaning to me because of the ski area at Jackson Hole. I could never say that just one is a personal favorite, but, I just smile each time I see that mountain range.

Last night, the described how the Superintendent of Yellowstone took John D. Rockerfeller, the NY oil man, to view the Tetons and made his case for Rockerfeller to fund purchasing land in the valley.  Rockerfeller committed millions for the purchase with the intent of putting the unspoiled valley land into the public trust, created a fictious cattle company to purchase land and, we were left hanging about the ending which has some local controversy. The series continues tonight and features the continuing saga of Grand Teton National Park.

Here's one skier who's really glad this place is preserved for "we the people". Check it out.
post #2 of 29
Nowing Ken Burns- he will tell the whole story.  There were many small landowners that were displaced by the huge land purchase.  Still a sore subject with some of the older locals.  I will be watching tonight. 
post #3 of 29
What time ?
post #4 of 29
 I've been watching it all week. 
It has been a great series to get absorbed in.

IIRC its been 8pm til I fall asleep every night.
post #5 of 29

Thanks TC, is this the same series as the one on Glacier National Park and around my part of the woods,The Blue Ridge Parkway


and if you caught this episode, here is a pic of grandfather Mtn. Where the last part of the parkway was completed with the Linn Cove Viaduct.

 

post #6 of 29
 I'm not sure if its the same series, but its been different every night thus far.  Sadly, I fall asleep early so I've missed the end of each episode.
post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

 I'm not sure if its the same series, but its been different every night thus far.  Sadly, I fall asleep early so I've missed the end of each episode.
 
You should try sleeping in until 5am or so, then you might be able to stay up for it.
post #8 of 29
I've been watching as much as I can and I've noticed shot after shot of Olympic NP without a mention of where the photos are from.  It's my favorite park, so I'm a homer, but it would be nice to attribute the cool pics.
post #9 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post



You should try sleeping in until 5am or so, then you might be able to stay up for it.
 
You, sir are a smart ass!
You are correct, of course, but you're still a smart ass. 
post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by steelman View Post

Nowing Ken Burns- he will tell the whole story.  There were many small landowners that were displaced by the huge land purchase.  Still a sore subject with some of the older locals.  I will be watching tonight. 
The series makes it pretty clear that in the creation of many parks, individual homeowners were forced to move, eminent domain in the early days. San Francisco got a water supply reservoir at the cost of a piece of the original Yosemine parcel. Places the the Great Smokey Mtn's. in Tenn. would have been stripped bare, as logging companies were making it a wasteland.

There's a lot of pain on both sides of the ledger, but, can anyone imagine not having these treasures available.

An interesting lesson from the series. Congress gave Teddy Roosevelt a statute that enabled the President to designate specific areas of great beauty as "National Landmarks". He was a lover of the outdoors and used this power often. For once, congress got something right. This was the act that was used to established the Grand Canyon against the wishes of most all in that area.
post #11 of 29

Must see TV

We’ve been watching since the start and plan to purchase the DVD version as it’s coming out soon.  Our video library is growing with Ken’s outstanding work. 

The other night the initial introduction of John D. Rockefeller Jr’s public land endowments as well as hands on work began at Mount Desert Island and the formation of Acadia National Park.

We spend a lot of time at Acadia National park biking on the trails…err…carriage roads.  Without a doubt, the most beautiful and scenic trails one could cover including horse drawn carriage as was initially conceived. 

The particular arched bridge with centered views of the water fall and trees particularly described in the Burn’s documentary is a wonderful spot to get off the bike and admire the unobstructed beauty John D had an eye to maintain.  Rockefeller made sure all views were best untouched by focusing on such detail as the carriage road and its grade, marking stones and bridgework personally.  Amazing foresight that fellow.  Good fortune for us all that his family’s money and philanthropic interest was ready to help our parks emerge. 

Found some views  of those carriage roads we took on bike some years back:  
















post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by steelman View Post

Nowing Ken Burns- he will tell the whole story.  There were many small landowners that were displaced by the huge land purchase.  Still a sore subject with some of the older locals.  I will be watching tonight. 

Yep. He did. And I got the impression some of those "small landowners" would have gladly sold their land to the lumber conpany. Or log it (or graze it) bare themselves.
post #13 of 29
Thread Starter 
Last night the Grand Teton National Park expansion was documented, somewhat abbreviated as far as details, and a settlement was reached. Next time you fly into there, enjoy the unspoiled views on the ride into the town and up to the ski area. That view we see when coming down just will not change.

This series is spectacular. It makes me feel very small in terms of anything I've done for our country.  We need to better appreciate the work done by past generations of Americans to build these crown jewels for future generations.
post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Living Proof View Post

Last night the Grand Teton National Park expansion was documented, somewhat abbreviated as far as details, and a settlement was reached. Next time you fly into there, enjoy the unspoiled views on the ride into the town and up to the ski area. That view we see when coming down just will not change.

This series is spectacular. It makes me feel very small in terms of anything I've done for our country.  We need to better appreciate the work done by past generations of Americans to build these crown jewels for future generations.
 
Yes it was very well done.  Interesting to see a former governer of Wy who along side Wallace Berry fought tooth and nail against the park say in the end, that he was glad they lost the fight.
post #15 of 29
Had no idea that so many of the Ansel Adams pics were done in the employ of the Federal Government.  That is a pretty cool gig if you can get it. 

The stories of the Japanese artists were beautiful and heart breaking.
post #16 of 29
I had spent a number of weeks backpacking in the Adirondacks by myself.  While in college in Buffalo I asked some friends if they wanted to backpack in the DACKs.  They said yes.  Columbus day  weekend in 1974 five of  us drove from Buffalo to hike up over Algonquin Peak and camp near Lake Colden.  Good times.  The bottle of Blackberry brandy ended up with one guy falling into the camp fire. No worries we poured water on him.

Next summer my roommate and I decided to go camping in the White Mountain National Forest in NH.   After a few days of backpacking and dealing with all the White Mountain National Forest Rules of where you can camp and where you can't camp, we drove back to the DACKs .   It was much more enjoyable backpacking in the DACKs. 

All the NY State Parks added together is larger than the 3 biggest National Parks put together.  The Adirondacks and the Catskill are awesome parks  to hike and backpack.  Kudos to NY State and forever wild law. 
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post

All the NY State Parks added together is larger than the 3 biggest National Parks put together. 
 

Can you share the actual stats on that?
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SKI-3PO View Post

Can you share the actual stats on that?

The NY State Adirondack park covers some 6.1 million acres (24,700 km²), a land area about the size of Vermont, or of the Yellowstone, Yosemite, Grand Canyon, Glacier, and Great Smoky Mountains National Parks combined.

The Catskill Park is in the Catskill Mountains in New York in the United States. It consists of 700,000 acres (2,800 km²) of land.

Then you have 100s of smaller parks all over NY State listed here.

Let me qualify my statement about the 3 largest National Parks, which excludes Alaska.  NY State parks can not compete with Alaska. The lower 48 largest National parks are Death Valley, Yellowstone, and Grand Staircase which combined adds up to a total of 30,300 km²

Not many people know that NY State even has the Grand Canyon of the East called Letchworth State Park shown here.
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post


Let me qualify my statement about the 3 largest National Parks, which excludes Alaska.

 

That makes much more sense to me.
post #20 of 29
NoT a very fair comparison. I suspect if you were to simply add the national park land Long with those lands protected with wilderness designations in Wyoming alone it would be more than that in newyork.
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Not many people know that NY State even has the Grand Canyon of the East called Letchworth State Park shown here
 
As a New York state resident, I quite enjoy all the state parks we have in the state.

But I don't think they hold a candle to the best of the National Parks. The "Grand Canyon of the East" is really tiny in that respect. I'm not even sure it's the "grandest" east of the Mississippi.

I've travelled and lived in a few different states. Pratically every state have their own "Grand Canyon of...". I have to laugh when I see another one.

post #22 of 29
We were near the Grand Canyon of PA over Labor day weekend.  Very nice area, but does not compare in any way to THE Grand Canyon.



post #23 of 29
Very nice! 

Haven't been there yet. I vaguely recall something about it. Where about in PA?
post #24 of 29
Providence Canyon

Providence Canyon State Park in Stewart County west central Georgia.
post #25 of 29
 I've gone canoeing on Pine Creek through the "grand canyon" of PA.  It's a nice camping trip.  That gorge in GA looks nice too.  I went kayaking in the Tallugha gorge in GA which was one of the cooler rivers I've ever done.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

Very nice! 

Haven't been there yet. I vaguely recall something about it. Where about in PA?
North central PA...see Wellsboro on a map.
post #27 of 29
Awesome state parks above shown above.  Thanks for posting!

Not to steal the thunder from the National Park system.  I think its great what some states have done with setting aside public use lands and state parks.  When people hear New York many people just think of New York City.  Personally I think the mountains and lakes in New York State are some of the best the east coast has to offer. 

One of my favorite spots that I have enjoyed in my life time is Avalanche Lake in the DACKs.  If you have never been there its definitely worth the 6 mile hike in to see it.

post #28 of 29
You can view this series on the net until Oct 9:
http://video.pbs.org/program/1072181584
post #29 of 29
 I've been to Avalanche lake.  It's Awsome!.  The Dacks remind me of the Tetons only smaller.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion