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Tire mounting whine

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Even with my small weak hands I can solve most tire mounting problems with a VAR tool, but now I'm stuck. I have a pair of Campy Zonda wheels and I want to put Conti 4000 folders on them, but I can't even get the FIRST bead over the edge of the rim, let alone put in the tube and seat the second bead. Ideas? 
post #2 of 27
 Take it to somebody with really strong thumbs. If you can't get the first bead on, I don't think it's a technique issue.
post #3 of 27
Soapy water in a squirt bottle.

Hair dryer to heat up the casing.

Stand on one end end streeetch with your hands.

If all else fails shot it.
Edited by Johnnys Zoo - 9/23/09 at 12:14pm
post #4 of 27
I know your pain.

I recently bought Conti 4000's and fought to get them onto my rims. Second ride, in the rain, I had a flat. No way my wet hands were going to stretch them back onto the rim. A cyclist came by and helped out. Get a friend.
post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 
 Finally got them on with a lot of talc, all over the inside of the tire and the inside of the rim.
post #6 of 27
 Now don't get a flat.
post #7 of 27
Thread Starter 
 I plan to ride with my VAR tool in my seat bag.
post #8 of 27
Evan,
My experience is once on the first time, they did become much easier to put back on. My single flat turned out to be a nightmare as my spare tube had a very slow leak and as I didn't have reading glasses to find the hole, I could not fix either tube on the road. I had the tire off at least 4 times.
The good news is that I've no flats since that single incident. My LBS pro loves the Conti 4000 and he rides mostly in Philly where roads facilitate flats.
post #9 of 27
 Next time you guys are looking fro wheels. You really should check out Roadtubeless. It's becoming a lot more accessible now as Fulcrum and Campag have brought out wheelsets and Shimano has added an Ultegra set. Flats are less common and repair is easier. Oh yeah, ride quality is better and rolling resistance is reduced too.
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

Oh yeah, ride quality is better and rolling resistance is reduced too.

Link please?
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Living Proof View Post

Evan,
My experience is once on the first time, they did become much easier to put back on. My single flat turned out to be a nightmare as my spare tube had a very slow leak and as I didn't have reading glasses to find the hole, I could not fix either tube on the road. I had the tire off at least 4 times.
The good news is that I've no flats since that single incident. My LBS pro loves the Conti 4000 and he rides mostly in Philly where roads facilitate flats.

next time use your spit...or water from a water bottle. Get the whole tube pumped a little and wet the whole thing, you'll soon see bubbles where the leak is! Works best with soapy water, but saliva or water work well, too. But yeah, not getting flats is another good technique
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

Link please?

Here's one - http://www.roadtubeless.net/en/rt-related
post #13 of 27
So what's the catch?

I mean, look at this years Tour de France, what percentage of riders are riding tubeless? What are they waiting for? 

Are you riding tubeless on your mtn bike, epic? It's been out for quite many years now. And I've thought about getting them more than a few times. But every time I ran into a rider riding tubeless and asked their experience, I always got a big yawn... and after a lot of humming and hahing, they say something like "yeah, it works". End of conversation! No, they don't ride away from me, at least the tires aren't THAT fast...

Seems in the mtn bike world, tubeless works about as well as tubed tires. But nothing seems to stand out enough to make their owner recommend them to their buddies!
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

So what's the catch?

I mean, look at this years Tour de France, what percentage of riders are riding tubeless? What are they waiting for?

In the Tour de France, the catch is that they weigh far more than a $5000 set of sew-ups. They were used by some of the Shimano sponsored teams in the Tour and they were also used quite a bit in the classics this year.

As for mountainbike, yes I am on tubeless. I have been since 2004. I have 5 sets of tubeless wheels and have only had a flat on one of them that was at DH park and the tire was ripped open by skidding over a nail sticking out of a wooden jump when the rider in front of me stopped. In addition to that, yes the ride is better. They do weigh more than the lightest of light tubes wheels. I don't know if this is 100% correct or not, but I was told by a WC mechanic that a MTB WC has not been won on a tubed tire since '99 or something like that.

Anyway, I think roadtubeless rocks especially for the recreational rider. The drawback to it has been very limited choices on rims and tires, but that is slowly improving.
post #15 of 27
Quote:
They do weigh more than the lightest of light tubes wheels. I don't know if this is 100% correct or not, but I was told by a WC mechanic that a MTB WC has not been won on a tubed tire since '99 or something like that.
 

Yes, I'm under the impression many pro riders ride tubeless.

Yet, there're still far fewer tubeless rims (relative to conventional rims) available for non-racers. So if that's any indication of where tubeless is heading, it'll be a very long wait for road tubeless to trickle down to the recreational riders.

 

 

post #16 of 27
you dont need tubeless ANYTHING to do this on a MTB or a cross bike for the matter. I jsut ghetto tubelessed my friends cross bike so that we could run 30 psi on 38cs and not pinch flat them.

I would imagine that witih at least the tubelsss road tires you could get this to work on a road bike as well.

FYI 100 percent of the expert and SS field this past weekend at my MTB race was tubeless.
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

you dont need tubeless ANYTHING to do this on a MTB or a cross bike for the matter. I jsut ghetto tubelessed my friends cross bike so that we could run 30 psi on 38cs and not pinch flat them.

I would imagine that witih at least the tubelsss road tires you could get this to work on a road bike as well.

FYI 100 percent of the expert and SS field this past weekend at my MTB race was tubeless.

 

You absolutely do need the tubeless roadtire. The bead is CF vs. kevlar which has a small amount of stretch and will blow off the rim. Stan's makes valves for rims such as Ksyriums which are not fully tubeless legal, but have a closed inner wall and will work. Not sure if a flatted or flatting tire would stay on the rim though as the bead profile is different.

BWPA did you use tubeless cross tires? Or was it full ghetto all the way?
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by reducedfatoreo View Post




next time use your spit...or water from a water bottle. Get the whole tube pumped a little and wet the whole thing, you'll soon see bubbles where the leak is! Works best with soapy water, but saliva or water work well, too. But yeah, not getting flats is another good technique
I've had good luck pumping the tube up pretty high and holding it under my nose. The skin there is very sensitive and you can feel even a very small leak.
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post




You absolutely do need the tubeless roadtire. The bead is CF vs. kevlar which has a small amount of stretch and will blow off the rim. Stan's makes valves for rims such as Ksyriums which are not fully tubeless legal, but have a closed inner wall and will work. Not sure if a flatted or flatting tire would stay on the rim though as the bead profile is different.

BWPA did you use tubeless cross tires? Or was it full ghetto all the way?

the tires on the bikes are tubeless. If I survive the revenge of the rattlesnake tomorrow, Ill be running my buddies cross bike in the cross race on sunday. I ll let you know how it goes.
post #20 of 27
 You have two strikes against you.  I have some Zonda wheels also.  I love them, but they seem to be slightly oversized and I have a problem getting any tires on them.  Second the Conti's always seem tight no mater what rim you put them on.  Put those two things together and you have a difficult mount.
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadrash View Post

Second the Conti's always seem tight no mater what rim you put them on.

ditto
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevesmith7 View Post


I've had good luck pumping the tube up pretty high and holding it under my nose. The skin there is very sensitive and you can feel even a very small leak.
 

Heh, points for a creative leak-finding technique, but I just got a flash of the tube blowing up under my nose . On the other hand, I do love me some tube-rubber smell. MMmmmmmm! 
post #23 of 27
Not really a danger as without the tire a tube gets pretty big with just a few psi.  Holding it under your nose after patching is optional :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by reducedfatoreo View Post




Heh, points for a creative leak-finding technique, but I just got a flash of the tube blowing up under my nose . On the other hand, I do love me some tube-rubber smell. MMmmmmmm! 
 
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

As for mountainbike, yes I am on tubeless. I have been since 2004. I have 5 sets of tubeless wheels and have only had a flat on one of them that was at DH park and the tire was ripped open by skidding over a nail sticking out of a wooden jump when the rider in front of me stopped. In addition to that, yes the ride is better. They do weigh more than the lightest of light tubes wheels. I don't know if this is 100% correct or not, but I was told by a WC mechanic that a MTB WC has not been won on a tubed tire since '99 or something like that.

Anyway, I think roadtubeless rocks especially for the recreational rider. The drawback to it has been very limited choices on rims and tires, but that is slowly improving.
 

So what do you do when you get a nail or something in the tire? (happened today!)
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post




So what do you do when you get a nail or something in the tire? (happened today!)

You mean like a puncture (not the tear that I had)?  You can run sealant in the tire. I don't, but if I lived in goathead land, I would. I carry one of these -
 
I also carry a patch kit (yes, they can be patched though the kit is slightly different. When you do puncture a tubeless tire it's different than a tube tire, pressure is lost much more slowly.
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

You mean like a puncture (not the tear that I had)?  You can run sealant in the tire. I don't, but if I lived in goathead land, I would. I carry one of these -
 
I also carry a patch kit (yes, they can be patched though the kit is slightly different. When you do puncture a tubeless tire it's different than a tube tire, pressure is lost much more slowly.

Yes, puncture. Like a nail. In my case, it's sharp shaped stone that got embeded in my tire!

Air "slowly" leak out till I noticed (because I was going slower and slower and even slower still...). Replace the tube, I was good to go. Or I could also boot the tire had the cut was bigger. I assume tubeless tires can be booted or repaired somehow on the trail?
Edited by at_nyc - 9/27/09 at 8:10am
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

 I assume tubeless tires can be booted or repaired somehow on the trail?

Sure. Of course you can also just put a tube in it if you want. Take the valve out and put in a tube. I carried one for a couple of years and never needed it, so I don't anymore.

I had a sharp rock in one of my road tires. Pulled it out and superglued the hole. That was a year ago.
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