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Cold feet and conveying information..

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I am wearing Lange FR 120's and have always had the cold feet to varying degrees. In the last couple of years it has become more noticeable. Yes I'm getting older, but..
I had posted here before and received help and suggestions that I have conveyed to the boot fitter that I have been using. Some improvements, but no real solution. New season coming and I want to see about new boots and maybe a new boot fitter.

Some background before I get to the real questions..

 

I have a small volume foot, high instep and high over the arch. going thru things I have added heaters, checked shell fit, punched, replaced inserts (old ones had broken down) tried adding relief over the arch etc..

 

In the off season I am having a blood flow analysis done - though thru exam things look OK. I do suffer from L5 disk issues which cause numbness in the right foot. Last season I developed numbness in the big toe(s) on the underside and side on both feet. My GP suspects that this may be caused by excessive pressure on the nerve at the joint (ball of the foot) - sorry I'm not sure how to convey the info. The GP (also a skier) suggested that maybe my boots are too tight across the width of the foot - well I don't think this is the issue as this mod has been done. I can also 'wiggle' my toes etc. However I do notice that when I ski, and initiate the turn by rolling the ankle that I feel the inside line of the foot with the big toe and the ball at the base of the big toe really loaded. This would feel like, think of almost trying to curl the big toe pulling a cloth across the floor. Now I am a tall guy (37" inseam) and it’s easy for me to get my knees forward and inside (maybe too much so) and I have the habit of riding the front of the outside boot thru phase 3 of a turn (identified and working on it).

 

I am wondering if my ‘poor’ technique is contributing to the nerve issue and more importantly the cold feet. Does 'loaded' inside of the foot mean that the ankle is collapsing to the inside? Could this be bad cuff alignment? Has something obvious been missed in the fitting process or have I failed to notice something in the way the boot feels during fit. Sounds like I’m clutching at straws,  I am …

 

I am also wondering how to convey the proper information to the boot fitter as I have thought that I was conveying information correctly and sensing how the boot feels (snug like a handshake)

Thanks for any help or suggestions..

Regards
Stephen
post #2 of 11
What you said might be addressing the issue, and my info is just addrressing the symptoms.

Intuition liners, dry the boots out, heater (you have them?) thin socks, boot gloves,
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveb View Post
  

I am wondering if my ‘poor’ technique is contributing to the nerve issue and more importantly the cold feet. Does 'loaded' inside of the foot mean that the ankle is collapsing to the inside? Could this be bad cuff alignment? Has something obvious been missed in the fitting process or have I failed to notice something in the way the boot feels during fit. Sounds like I’m clutching at straws,  I am …

  

I would like to address this specific statement.   You mentioned you were tall with a 37" inseam!!  Wow that is a long leg, which makes me visualize your knees hanging way out over your toe pieces and if this is compounded by a hyper mobil ankle joint?  You may have some serious alignment issues which if resolved will have huge benefits instantly to your technique issues!

What bindings are you using on your skis?  what is your boot sole length?  how tall are you?  Do you know if your dorsiflexion range of motion is on the hyper mobile end or very limited end of the spectrum?  Helping us with these answers will more accurately assess your alignment needs.

I am guessing at this point you may need to reduce your binding delta angle as well as reduce the boots forward lean and possibly reduce the ramp angle in the boot as well?  Any footage of you skiing?  Addressing this issue may also help immensely with your numb feet issues too?  You may be getting too much pressure on the balls of your feet causing some of your problems???
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks for taking the time..

I'm 6-2 - 187lbs
The 37" inseam come from measuring for bike fit (back against the wall, book spine pushed up - measure from book spine to floor) so hopefully this isn't misleading.
Boot length - I measured the lugs - 315mm measured tip to heel (size 9 marked on the bottom of the boot)
Ski is XWing Tornado Ti 178 with z14 bindings
dorsiflexion - no idea really, but if if I sit with my knees at 90 and the foot flat on the floor - keep the heel on the floor and raise my toes I'm somewhere in the 15 degree range.

Sorry no footage of me skiing, that's on the to do list

Stephen
post #5 of 11
 Not familiar with "book spine" reference?  It doesn't sound like you are at the extremes I originally thought but you may benefit from having your fore/aft position checked by a specialist.
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Checking fore/aft position - what is involved ? - is this done by someone other than the boot fitter? Or should I be looking for a different professional ?

Book spine.. basically stand with your back to the wall - take a book and put it between your legs with your feet a short distance apart, and pull up, keeping the book spine perpendicular to the wall - measure to the floor. This is one way of getting a number to use for saddle height  and frame sizing.


Regards
post #7 of 11
but don't pull up so hard as to do damage to the unmentionables
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CEM View Post

but don't pull up so hard as to do damage to the unmentionables
This is without question......
post #9 of 11
 thanks for the explanation Steve

There are four parameters involved in fore/aft alignment.  Coordinating these parameters to find your optimum static position takes a knowledgeable boot fitter/alignment specialist who understands the methodology and goals.
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hi Bud,

Thanks,

And thanks to someone on the forum I have a name of a local to me a boot fitter that I will go and see. What questions should I ask to see if the boot fitter has a solid grasp of alignment issues?
post #11 of 11
 Educate  yourself as much as possible about proper  alignment then when interviewing your potential  boot fitter you will know pretty quickly if he/she has  a good grasp of  the concepts.  I invite you to look at the Epicski  boot  fitters web sites to begin your search  for knowledge! There is some good info contained in these websites that will give you some insight into our methodology and philosophies! 
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