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Boot Flex Index

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I Have noticed more Boot manufactures are using a flex index. My question is Has the Industry come up with a uniform test to measure flex? Or is this up to the individual Company's to do their own index. In other words if Solomon has a boot with a flex of 100 would it be the same in an Atomic or Tecnica?
post #2 of 13
The flex index are only useful within an individual company's line, Salomon and Tecnica will not be the same. They are all in the same ballpark, for the most part, but there is no 'standard'.
post #3 of 13
Why on earth they cannot come up with a standard I don't know.
post #4 of 13
there has been a bit of talk about it over the past few years and hopefully soon they will all comply...the biggest problem is the flex of a boot is depedant on so many factors, to give one example ...depending on how the back of the clog/cuff is designed depends on the durometer of the plastic used, there is a new boot coming from  ******* next seson and to get he boot to flex at their 110 rated flex they need to inject plastic which would normally be 150 flex...pigmentation also has a great deal to add to the mix

another problem is how they would all get the boot to be a standard flex, again down to the design of the boot every small change in plastic shape and thickness and as said pigmnet weill have an effect
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
It seems to me if  Engineers can come up with a rateing for bindings they they should be able to come up with a rating system for boots. You put x amount of pressure on a boot and the results would be within a a preset scale.
  Thanks for the replies 
 I tried on some Atomic B120's and they seemed to have about the same flex as some Heads I tried with a flex of 100.
post #6 of 13
the problem is different plastics and pigments react differntly at different temperatures.... that atomic 120 will stiffen up in the cold more than the head 100.... the problem is we all try boots on in the shop where the plastic is soft pliable and not reacting as it will in the cold
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
 Maybe we need a Boot cooler like a Wine cooler.  Keep the shop at 50 F and the cooler at 32 F   Just a thought,
post #8 of 13
next design problem...getting into frozen boots
post #9 of 13
Personally I don't believe flex index is uniform even with same company. Actually it might be for non-racing boots, but once you compare flex of racing boots and non-racing boots, things just can't be same, even if numbers are same. My Fischer World cup Pro 95 130 boots have 130 flex, and compared to this, my working boots (Fischer Soma World cup 130) feel like chewing gum, even if they also have 130 flex.
post #10 of 13

Even if there was a uniform standard for boot flex, would it really be meaningful?

There are still several other factors that are going to affect how the boot actually works -- think of  hinge placement, cuff height and ramp angle for a start.  Two boots with an equivalent flex rating (even from the same manufacturer) could very well ski very differently, so trying to compare A vs B based on a nominal flex rating is a risky proposition.

 

Better to think of it like the turn radius of a ski.  We have a good general idea of what to expect from a 19 m ski, but we would never think that a 19 m Atomic would be the same as a 19 m Rossi, and wouldn't be comparing the two based on that measurement. 

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by CEM View Post

the problem is different plastics and pigments react differntly at different temperatures.... that atomic 120 will stiffen up in the cold more than the head 100.... the problem is we all try boots on in the shop where the plastic is soft pliable and not reacting as it will in the cold
 

(See also CEM #4)

It sounds appealing to have a documented number that will simplify the decision making process, but all the real life variables that come into play simply reinforce the fact that there's just no substitute for a knowledgeable boot fitter.

I would much rather rely on someone like CEM who can describe much more reliably how the brands compare, irrespective of arbitrary manufacturer specs.  More importantly, a good fitter knows what other boot characteristics make a given model the best choice for an individual.

The repeated chorus of "see a boot-fitter" is an ongoing annoyance to folks who want to be able to make a catalogue purchase over the Internet to save $50, but the thing is, some products just aren't commodity items that can be purchased on paper specs.
post #12 of 13

All boots are tested in the same way, at the same temperature with the same parameters, what happens to the boot at different temperatures will depend on different plastics used in your boot. 

post #13 of 13

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