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Hate to be a buzzkill, but... - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post




Ya, and you're most likely to be in a car accident within 10 miles of your home...BECAUSE THAT'S WHERE YOU DRIVE MOST.. Duh.. Most accidents will occur where there lies the most potential accidents waiting to happen (er um people skiing).

I've dug in to the ski deaths and main cause thing a little.  Avalanche and cliff deaths are included in the data above I believe.  Hitting trees in the trees or hitting trees or rocks right off the trail is the behavior that is more likely to kill more folks because so many more do that than huck 50 footers or duck ropes on dump days..  This is because on the edge of any trail at most speeds, a slip or edge hook and you're headed in to trees in the blink of an eye.  However, I'm still going to jam down the sides of the trails in the sugar because that is what I enjoy.  I still will drive to and from my house because I have to.  Anybody care to bet what I die from? 
 
I'll put $10 on Cancer, and hedge my bet with $5 on Heart problems.
post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post



Do that thing you do, oh so well.   Snowbowl is all blues isn't it ??
 
No, mostly greens, with brown trunks.
post #33 of 51
 VA 

On topic, this occurred to me when I was skiing Keystone last winter.  We'd been skiing trees and bumps all day but on the way back to the lodge at the end of the day, on blue and green runs, I found my legs fatigued and my speed increasing on the looooooong cruisers.  I actually thought, "Ooof, I need to speed check because NOW is when I could do something reallllly stupid!"
post #34 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post



No, mostly greens, with brown trunks.
I mean in winter,dammit
post #35 of 51
Mt. Baker has the highest fatality rate of any ski area in NA, but none of those fatalities fit into this category. The deaths were caused by avalanches, treewells, falls/impacts off-piste, falls/impacts in the park and heart attacks in roughly that order.

Risk will be different for different people doing different things in different places. In the NE, there would be few avalanches, tree wells or off-piste accidents. There would, however, be lots of people of blue and green runs who occasionally ski off those runs. The total number of people in those ski areas exceeds the number skiing off-piste at Baker as well. Hence a statistic that shows that cruising is the most dangerous activity.

Take it as you will.
post #36 of 51
As iWill says, Baker has its fatalities off the groomed, but there isn't that much groomed.  When I ski on Baker's groomers I feel like I'm in a war zone and want to find a way off of them as soon as possible.  That being said, there is no denying that we loose at least one person per year and all of them off the groomed.  Lately it's been people going over cliffs unintentionally.

If you visit us, make sure you hook up with a local who can guide you to safe places.  Those cliffs are not easy to see from above and there are secret passageways through them in places.  The uninitiated might see tracks, follow them, get the knarly pow, and launch themselves into space.


Edited for accuracy
Edited by Posaune - 9/19/09 at 9:54am
post #37 of 51
Wonder how much width of the trails has to do with fatality rate?  From personal observation, western blues and greens are normally pretty wide open;  Eastern runs have the reputaion of being narrower.  Are there more fatalities per million in the east than the west?
post #38 of 51
Yes, we can die skiing, even on blues.   When your number's up it's up.  It might as well be skiing.  This thread made me think of this.  It happened around the corner from my work campus.

Bicycle safety expert killed in collision with car in North Carolina


The accident was rules to be the expert's fault.

The Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill "Triangle" area has lost one of its most vocal and knowledgeable cycling safety experts in a crash with a car in Apex, North Carolina. Bruce Rosar, 56, died after being struck by a vehicle while cycling along one of the area's popular routes on Saturday afternoon.


Here's another one from 2002.  I don't know who got the blame for this one, but it just goes to show the most careful are not immune to disaster.  
It looks like the bus turned left here so I'd probably say the bus was at fault though.

Bicycle and pedestrian safety expert struck and killed by bus


ST. LOUIS — One of the country's top experts on bicycle and pedestrian safety died when she was struck by a tour bus while crossing a downtown intersection.

Susie Stephens, 36, of Winthrop, Wash., was struck shortly after 8:30 a.m. yesterday. The Vandalia Bus Lines driver told police he did not see her as he made a left turn.

post #39 of 51

One of the country's top experts on bicycle and pedestrian safety. The Vandalia Bus Lines driver told police he did not see her as he made a left turn.......Goes to show,never assume. Right or wrong your still at the morgue.

post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Yes, we can die skiing, even on blues.   When your number's up it's up.  It might as well be skiing.  This thread made me think of this.  It happened around the corner from my work campus.

Bicycle safety expert killed in collision with car in North Carolina


The accident was rules to be the expert's fault.

The Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill "Triangle" area has lost one of its most vocal and knowledgeable cycling safety experts in a crash with a car in Apex, North Carolina. Bruce Rosar, 56, died after being struck by a vehicle while cycling along one of the area's popular routes on Saturday afternoon.


Here's another one from 2002.  I don't know who got the blame for this one, but it just goes to show the most careful are not immune to disaster.  
It looks like the bus turned left here so I'd probably say the bus was at fault though.

Bicycle and pedestrian safety expert struck and killed by bus


ST. LOUIS — One of the country's top experts on bicycle and pedestrian safety died when she was struck by a tour bus while crossing a downtown intersection.

Susie Stephens, 36, of Winthrop, Wash., was struck shortly after 8:30 a.m. yesterday. The Vandalia Bus Lines driver told police he did not see her as he made a left turn.




 

post #41 of 51
^^^
post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

Live in fear, be prepared!

That looks like it would go really well with with Chubbs or Machete Sins or some other Volants with a polished metal top.  Do you have a picture of yourself on the slopes in this outfit?
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by cometjo View Post



That looks like it would go really well with with Chubbs or Machete Sins or some other Volants with a polished metal top.  Do you have a picture of yourself on the slopes in this outfit?
 

That's not VA, there isn't enough room in that iron for his beard.
post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post



I mean in winter,dammit
 

They are mostly evergreens, except for.........

post #45 of 51
Ah The Larch.  I like shrubbery . Would there be shrubbery also ?
post #46 of 51
VA is absolutely killin it....hilarious.
post #47 of 51
 He's quite a card! Haha! Very humorous!
post #48 of 51
 
post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post

VA is absolutely killin it....hilarious.
Killin what ? Any evidence of dead soldiers ??
post #50 of 51
"Experienced" does not mean competent. Quite a few people ski beyond their competency with little comprehension of the risk.  People who are expert in potentially dangerous sports whether they be skiing or climbing or whatever tend to meet hazards with preparation, training and skill. This implies an understanding of the risks they face and a knowledgeable acceptance of those risks. This tends to differ from the attitude of people who are apt to see their sports as somehow "death defying" or  a test of their manhood or some similar self concept that enables them to avoid recognition of the danger in their behavior or in the choices they make. Risk taking per se tends to be more intrinsic to the motivation of the latter group.

Young males skiing the edge of intermediate trails reminds me of a masters clinic at Killington a few years ago with one of the PSIA demo team. Wherever our group stopped, trying to avoid locations blind from above or avoid obstructing the trail, invariably there would be young guys skiing fast close to our group, often skiing more or less straight down the edge of the trail in the soft snow at the margin of the trail. It was disconcerting to move way over to the edge in order to be out of the trail and have some guy blast through within inches of us and the trees. These folks were skiing pretty much out of control and endangering not only themselves but others as well.  I doubt if they had much comprehension of this. I'm reminded of this when I witness young people smoking for example or a surprisingly large number of people who ride motorcycles or when I try to reconstruct the often bizarre patterns of decision making that lead to people becoming lost in the mountains and/or subject to search and rescue.
post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post



Killin what ? Any evidence of dead soldiers ??
 
Yup.



I just wish I had some live ones.
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