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Help get me up to speed on bindings.....

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I have reignited my passion of youth (didnt lose track of women, just skiing).  The last pair of new bindings I bought was a pair of Tyrolia 390's circa '86.  I purchased them to replace a pair of Bessers that I could not find parts for.  I wont bore you with my story since then but will add that I am 50, a very strong skier with 8 knee operations (including ACL repl) behind me.  My heart says I'm 25 but the morning aches say otherwise.  I notice that all the mfg'rs make everything now.  OK, I get it, but is that good or bad?  Is it best to buy equipment that "matches" or can I mix and match at will? Appearances never meant squat to me, just results.  I've been lurking, reading and enjoying a lot of interesting threads on Epic so I will value your opinions.... 

post #2 of 19
I'm not completely sure what the question is but........................

Some skis are what is termed a system. This means that the ski has a provision built into it such as a rail or somesuch that dictates the type of binding you use. In this case, you have no choice and you live with the binding that comes with the ski.

Other skis are termed flat skis. This means you can choose whatever you like.

According to the brochure......some of the integrated rail systems offer an advantage. For a hard snow specialty or at least a hard snow biased ski, this is probably true (at least for that specific condition). For a ski that is intended for soft snow and/or off trail usage, I personally doubt that any advantage exists. In fact it is possible to make the argument that a rail system is a disadvantage for that type of conditions.

SJ 
post #3 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by CANEXAS View Post

I have reignited my passion of youth (didnt lose track of women, just skiing).  The last pair of new bindings I bought was a pair of Tyrolia 390's circa '86.  I purchased them to replace a pair of Bessers that I could not find parts for.  I wont bore you with my story since then but will add that I am 50, a very strong skier with 8 knee operations (including ACL repl) behind me.  My heart says I'm 25 but the morning aches say otherwise.  I notice that all the mfg'rs make everything now.  OK, I get it, but is that good or bad?  Is it best to buy equipment that "matches" or can I mix and match at will? Appearances never meant squat to me, just results.  I've been lurking, reading and enjoying a lot of interesting threads on Epic so I will value your opinions.... 


Its all to do with acquisitions and mergers in the ski industry....

Atomic bought ESS so Atomic Race and Device bindings are basically a continuation of the old ESS VAR binding line. Atomic and Salomon have the same owners, so many of the other Atomic bindings are rebadged Sollys. Neox and Tix are Atomic originals - and almost always come packaged with an Atomic ski that has the appropriate plate for them.

Fischer, Head and Elan bindings are all rebadged Tyrolias.

Dynastar and Rossi bindings are all Look designs.

Blizzard bindings are made by Marker.

The main factors for matching brands would be whether matching extends your warranty (e.g. Fischer bindings on Fischer skis doubles your warranty, but do you care?), or whether the skis come with a system plate that demands a particular brand (pre-drilled or some kind of rail system).

Other than that, mix and match at will. The Marker Royal Family (Jester/Griffon if you don't need a touring setup, Duke/Baron if you do) are very popular. There's also a lot of excitement about Dynastar/Look/Rossi relaunching the turntable P14 and P18 bindings that have been unavailable for a few years.
post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks, Squawker, that helps tremendously!  Any comments out there on the new Knee Binding from people who have actually skied on them (I've read the existing posts on Epic...)? 

post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by CANEXAS View Post

Thanks, Squawker, that helps tremendously!  Any comments out there on the new Knee Binding from people who have actually skied on them (I've read the existing posts on Epic...)? 


IMHO, the Kneebinding is still a "work in progress" and is not there yet. I have yet to ski it but have played with it a bit, personally I wouldn't put it on my skis. 
post #6 of 19

The Kneebinding folks just refitted my family's set of Kneebindings with new molded-in AFDs and brake assemblies that should solve what some people saw as potential issues. The current versions now have their forward and rear Teflon AFDs molded into the risers, so they can't come off. I skied on last year's version for 47 days of the 61 days I skied last season without any prereleases, and am looking foward to skiing on them again this season now that the new parts were installed. I felt that the Kneebindings gave me a more connected feeling to my edges than my Markers, Looks, and Salomons.

post #7 of 19
 Pictures.....
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 Pictures.....

You mean the ones of CfRI and his "test" family up on the wall @ Kneebindings HQ?
post #9 of 19
New Kneebinding Riser on iM82 a

New Kneebinding Riser on iM82 b

New Kneebinding Riser on iM82 c

Sorry for the delay in posting some pictures of the new Kneebinding updates, but I had to get back up here to my ski house to take them. It's unfortunately been a rather slow start to the New England season this year, but today we went "ski-hopping" first to Waterville Valley and then to Bretton Woods. The new Kneebinding riser plates with molded in Teflon AFDs worked fine and the solid connected feel of the Kneebindings is still there and just as solid - now we just need some real snow. Hey the plow guy is on my driveway now, gotta run...
post #10 of 19
I saw a pretty cool ad for those in Ski Magazine and they seem like they would work.  FYI, I got about 7 inches of snow in Pennsylvania 
post #11 of 19
 I'm glad to see they took care of you. I'm still a bit of a skeptic, but it would be great if they proved to do what other bindings can't. First they have to prove that they can just do what all the other bindings already do.
post #12 of 19
I have 66 ski days on Kneebindings so far and they are holding up fine - and not a single pre-release even though I'm using a DIN of only 6.5 (right from the chart for me). They are proving themselves nicely in the areas of retention, responsiveness, and durability, while only more time will tell if they can reduce knee injuries the other bindings simply admit they can't protect against.
post #13 of 19

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

I have 66 ski days on Kneebindings so far and they are holding up fine - and not a single pre-release even though I'm using a DIN of only 6.5 (right from the chart for me). They are proving themselves nicely in the areas of retention, responsiveness, and durability, while only more time will tell if they can reduce knee injuries the other bindings simply admit they can't protect against.
Nice pics of the binding.
I've got 225,000 miles on the car and no problems with the air bag...
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Nice pics of the binding.
I've got 225,000 miles on the car and no problems with the air bag...
 

that made me lol many times. ive got 321K miles on my Benz. theres no airbag to worry about.

i don't see how Knee bindings would guard against knee injuries. the work the same as other binding don't they???

EDIT. maybe i should read before i assume.http://kneebinding.com/KB-Product.aspx
post #15 of 19

Gregory:

Kneebindings release like other bindings (laterally at the toe and upward at the heel) but are the only bindings that also release laterally to the inside at the heel piece, to reduce the likelihood of ACL injuries. Note the red plastic parts in the heel piece, which are related to the lateral heel release feature. 

I have unfortunately had some knee injuries over the years, including a completely ruptured ACL two years ago. Knee injuries suck. Having my ACL reconstructed cost me half a ski season, $20K in medical expenses, and put me through 6 months of physical therapy/re-hab. I was on Look bindings when I ruptured my ACL. I have been using Kneebindings post surgery to hopefully reduce the chance of a re-injury.

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

I was on Look bindings when I ruptured my ACL. I have been using Kneebindings post surgery to hopefully reduce the chance of a re-injury.


So Look bindings are the cause of knee injuries? I've used them for 40+ years and, well, no problem.

Do the Kneebindings have airbags?
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Nice pics of the binding.
I've got 225,000 miles on the car and no problems with the air bag...

 

Any issues with the gas pedal sticking?
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post




So Look bindings are the cause of knee injuries? I've used them for 40+ years and, well, no problem.

Do the Kneebindings have airbags?
 

I don't believe I said that Look bindings caused my knee injury. I merely stated the fact that I was using Look bindings at the time my ACL ruptured. My knee injury was caused by my getting pitched into the air unexpectedly and landing on my tails. Look bindings clearly didn't prevent my knee injury though. I should add that I never had pre-release problems with Looks, and was always able to use them at the same 6.5 DIN without pre-release. However, I had previously had pre-release problems with both Markers and Salomons when set to 6.5 DIN.
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Any other Kneebinding users wish to share comments on how their experience with the product is going?
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