EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Cycling › Pro pedal is a band aid.
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Pro pedal is a band aid. - Page 3

post #61 of 69

This is all both trail and bike dependent.  Pro-pedal comes on a variety of suspensions, first of all.  In my experience, where propedal can be a negative is while climbing on steep-er loose trails, because the propedal can rob you of some traction.  In situations where people would think they would notice it more, like climbing bony trails, it seems to either matter less or be a benefit. 

 

Most people over time smooth out their riding and also learn the benefits of a little bob, if they both ride regularly and have a focus on the downhill part of the ride.  So, if they are actually attentive to things like running propedal, they may use it less.

 

It will help most people to have propedal on most bikes.  While most riders will play with it a few times and then forget about it, it will also benefit anyone to play with settings a lot, along with getting used to the other aspects of their suspension.  This will also help them develop the subjective thing known as bike feel, which is in a way much more important than the fine print of their suspension design.  All suspension designs have trade-offs, and the fact that some benefit from propedal doesn't mean they're inferior. 

post #62 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

As a partial thread highjack:  Anyone have experience with setting up Propedal for a light person.  Despite the setup CD that came with it, and the info on their web site that both say you can run the shock at 50-100 lbs. pressure, FOX is telling me you can't really run it at less than 100 lbs. and expect any performance. 

My wife is about 112 lbs and the correct sag comes out to about 70 lbs pressure on here Santa Cruz Blurr, but the shock loses air and doesn't perform for sh%# at that pressure.  I've replaced the seals once and it hasn't changed anything.

Any info on what pressure and settings lighter people are running would be helpful.  Thanx.


Don't worry too much about the pressure reading on your pump guage.  Always set the sag according to measurement of the O-Ring and not recommended pressure for rider weight, because my experience is that the pump gauges can be wildly inaccurate.  I have two Fox pumps and one reads 20lbs higher than the other at the same pressure.

post #63 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by exracer View Post




Don't worry too much about the pressure reading on your pump guage.  Always set the sag according to measurement of the O-Ring and not recommended pressure for rider weight, because my experience is that the pump gauges can be wildly inaccurate.  I have two Fox pumps and one reads 20lbs higher than the other at the same pressure.


I have experienced the same thing with two identical" Fox pumps, but my problem continues.  I have had the seals and the valve stem replaced, but her RP23 still loses 50 psi every ride (120 down to 70 psi).  I run mine at about twice the pressure and have no problems. It seems like running it at close to 100 psi does not give it enough pressure to keep the seals sealed.

 

Anybody else out there running the Fox RP23 at low pressure?
 

post #64 of 69

Sounds like the shock is defective.

 

As far as spring rate, the recomened PSI or setting sag percentages are just guidelines.

post #65 of 69

Have you asked Fox about your problem? 120 psi doesn't seem all that low. I'd start with calling Fox and/or having the LBS do an air-sleeve service which is pretty straight forward to do.

post #66 of 69

Fox sent me a free seal kit, but sending it back to them for service would take close to two weeks in prime mountain biking season.  At this point, it is easier to just keep pumping it up every ride.

post #67 of 69

Look up the air sleeve service on the net. I'd bet you can do it yourself.

post #68 of 69

I have done the sleeve service on my own shock. The hardest part is getting the shock unmounted and remounted into the frame. The service its self isn't too bad and fox has a video demo to walk you through it. But if you have already changed the seals then it probably won't help much.

post #69 of 69

Definitely try to do the air sleeve service yourself.  Read up on the procedure on the Internet (Fox has excellent information you can download) and then go for it.  Once you've purchased the shock oil and float fluid that you need, you'll be able to do a number of servicings of your shock as well as your fork.

 

I serviced my girlfriend's Fox shock this summer for the first time and it was a simple procedure.  Once you've done it once, it will take you half as long the next time, then you'll have the confidence to tackle the fork.

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Cycling › Pro pedal is a band aid.