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Are my skis too old?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
 Hello,

First time poster here.  Back in the good old days, I was a dedicated skier and competitive racer.  I have not skied since winter 1999, sheesh 10 years!  I would have considered myself an expert at that time.  No doubt, I've lost some skills!!

My skis are race stock Fischer SL Supers that I got maybe in 1996/7...can't really remember.  They are the old school design, i.e. no serious side cut/carving design.

I'm moving back up north which will allow me to ski again!!!!  But, will my skiis still be good?  Will the 'pop' from the core be worn out???

tia,

sani
post #2 of 24
Welcome, and welcome back.

It is a brave very new world.  Like you did the long hiatus and got back into it, the changes are mind boggling in the equipment world. 

If I had the first day back to do over again would have rented a pair of current 'mid-fat' recreational skis, and left the old ones in the rack.  They ski so much differently than where you are coming from, and will not require the technical stimulus your old race skis demanded.  It is close to think turn and it happens, you'll love it. 

The other item to be considered are boots.  Depending on the vintage and sole specifications they might be an issue with shops.  Possibly won't but don't be surprised if a shop guy grumbles about them. 

Just do what you have to do and get back on the hill, is so worth it.

PS.  Check in at the 'first chair' link and say hello.  Good people here.
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I've been reviewing gear the last few weeks, now that I know I'm heading back north...and the gear has chnaged a lot.  Basically, I'm a technical beginer again.

So you would recomend renting....probably good advice...but can my ego handle it  :-p

Boots too?!?!  I have 1995/6 maybe Lange's that are an absolute beutiful fit, man I love thoise boots.  Took me a long time to find the right ones, I'd hate to have to find another pair.

sani
post #4 of 24
Sure, wonder into a good shop in your new neighborhood and do a little recon.  Always a great source for some local knowledge in a new local.

The word today is "DEMO", much less demeaning than rent.  You can try some quality skis in good tune and most shops will give you 1 or 2 days demo fees towards purchase if you choose to go that way. 

Suggest with your background try out something between eye and forehead level in length. 

That's my 2 cents worth.  Have a hoot!
post #5 of 24
 I would keep the boots and demo some skis. 
post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

 I would keep the boots and demo some skis. 

What he said.  Doing Research is a good excuse to rent a new and different  top of the line ski every time you go skiing.
post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 
 Great advice, thanks.  I'll call it "demo'ing"

sani
post #8 of 24
Your Langes may have an "absolute beautiful fit" but I pretty much guarantee you that the cuffs no longer flex forward. If you really can't live without those Langes, take 'em to a reputable shop and have them freed up. If you can't flex the ankle, you won't be able to ski properly on your new boards.

Karl
post #9 of 24
You likely can still flex 'em, but maybe you won't want to be going fast enough and turning hard enough to flex them all the time.  The switch from my old stiff race boots to the much softer Solomon Crossmax was for the most part a good thing for me.  I got new boots mostly because I got tired of worrying about frozen toes in my two-sizes-too-small race boots and thought painful feet weren't really required, but I benefited from the much softer flex too.  Softer flex gives you more latitude in bumps and soft snow.  Today's skis are softer longitudinally too, so you don't need as much to flex the ski.

New boots should still be pretty low on your list though, unless your boots crack from plastic fatigue.
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

New boots should still be pretty low on your list though, unless your boots crack from plastic fatigue.

 
This is a distinct possibility since his old boots are about 14 years old. 

Going the demo route certainly has many advantages if you have a strong budget, but it is time consuming, especially if you do it at the ski area on the morning of a day you want to ski.  As an alternative I am also a big fan of ski swaps.  Sep, Oct and Nov are the big months for those if you get to Canada with a lot of ski shops in your city that will host swaps.  Typically, at swaps you can get both used skis and boots (<5 yrs old, decent stuff) for ~$175 total, maybe about the same as three or four days of demos.  If you are planning on a fairly active season (10-20 days) this will save you money and you'll learn more about what you like in the new technology and can invest more heavily to upgrade in a year or two.  Many ski swaps are hosted by Ski Patrolers (fundraising event) and/or knowledgeable ski shop employees.  Be sure to consult with them on sizes/models/fitting.
post #11 of 24
 I ski a lot and require a good fit as I am required to be out all day.  Bad fitting boots are the worst.  I would recommend a new boot that will form to your foot.  That being said I am planning on trying to get a used high performance boot at the swap this year and using a new Intuition liner and one of my old footbeds in it.  This will not be my primary boot, but I think it will work great for patrolling in.  I work at two mountains and keep a set of gear in each locker room.
post #12 of 24
I would be fairly happy to still be in a Lange race boot from 1973.  Not 1972, and certainly not 1968.

Skis made their big changes recently.  They are still changing, though not as fast.  If you took all the changes boots saw fron 68-73, skis did the same from 1998-2003.  The old skis still work, but man, are they boring!
post #13 of 24
I went into non-ski hibernation from 1998-2007.  When I got back in to it I picked up a couple pair of assorted vintage skis from the decade I had missed out on i.e. a pair from 00, 02, and 04 to try a little of everything.  If you were a good all around skier, it won't be as much of a transition as some folks say it is.  If you were more of a focused racer or other specialist then it might be a bit more of a challenge.  Today's boards are more geared for two footed skiing., While the old skool pole-banging was mostly/extremely outside foot oriented.  If you could also ski bumps and powder well then you'll probably not be intimidated at all once you make a couple of "welcome back" turns on a pair of carving skis or Mid-Fats.  One thing to watch for is that hooking an edge on a 12 arc radius ski can send you off course bigtime.  Other than that, it's still really just skiing IMHO.
post #14 of 24
Keep the boots.

Don't be afraid of the new skis. It might take you a little time to adjust fully so that you can use all their capabilities, but you'll like them from the get go.
post #15 of 24
+1 on keep the boots,

But, also find a new pair to pack out and break in.  I've seen many an old boot crack on the first really cold day back in action after a long period in exile, especially if they weren't kept in a climate controlled location.
post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all for the advice.  I will be keeping my boots for this year anyway, pending a big cracker in the shell.

With regard to skis - you have all given really good advice.  Demo'ing or renting does seem to be a good route - but I will be skiing probably 20 days this year (already have a seasons pass) and the cumulative costs seem to high for that option.  Not to mention the P.I.T.A, factor at the mountain rental shop in the morning....


On the other hand if I go the ski swap route (great idea by the way, thanks Jamesj!), the problem with this route is I have NO IDEA what type of ski to get or size or anything!?!?!?  I really think this is the better option for me.  HELP!

This was my old school M.O. - high speed carving, some off piste (but 75% groomers, weight 140lbs, height 5'8", previous skis were Fischer SL Supers 195 length.  I plan to join a masters training group and race league.

tia,

sani
post #17 of 24
You'll do well with something a bit longer and with less cut than what others might recommend.  Something 180 cm with a 20-26 m radius.    Ski swaps will be full of skis their owners think are too long and too skinny, and they will be great transition skis for you.

The thing you'll find is that while we used to think there were big differences in skis, it was really no big deal. They were all about 200cm,  with an 85-65-75 cut. Now it is a BIG deal, and a few pairs will give you a vastly different experience and whole lot more fun.

Go to a ski swap and pick up a non-race stock GS ski for your high speed carving and re-intro to gates.  Then look for some ski with a waist of 85-95 for off piste and crud (Head monster 88?).  There will be some available from people convinced they need something fatter.

For real kicks, pick up a pair of 165 slalom skis.....what a rollercoaster ride!  I got my first sl skis well used for about $135 with bindings and they were a gas, and were instrumental in learning how to take advantage of the new skis.
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

You'll do well with something a bit longer and with less cut than what others might recommend.  Something 180 cm with a 20-26 m radius.    Ski swaps will be full of skis their owners think are too long and too skinny, and they will be great transition skis for you.

The thing you'll find is that while we used to think there were big differences in skis, it was really no big deal. They were all about 200cm,  with an 85-65-75 cut. Now it is a BIG deal, and a few pairs will give you a vastly different experience and whole lot more fun.

Go to a ski swap and pick up a non-race stock GS ski for your high speed carving and re-intro to gates.  Then look for some ski with a waist of 85-95 for off piste and crud (Head monster 88?).  There will be some available from people convinced they need something fatter.

For real kicks, pick up a pair of 165 slalom skis.....what a rollercoaster ride!  I got my first sl skis well used for about $135 with bindings and they were a gas, and were instrumental in learning how to take advantage of the new skis.
 

I second this advice.  It is pretty likely that your opinion on ski shape will go through a couple of stages.  I know mine did.
When / if you get to the point that you want to demo current gear, using an on-mountain shop with a swap-out option is a good idea,  It cost a little more than one choice from an off-mountain shop, but less than demoing several different days.  Then I would suggest sampling across the spectrum rather than fine tuning choices.Sking them in close succession will help you sort out what you like, too.  (For example, I did Xplorers, Hellcats, and Katanas one day last year,)
post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 
 what about Dynastar contact 4x4's in a 184 length?

sani
post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 
 
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanigene View Post

 what about Dynastar contact 4x4's in a 184 length?

sani
 

Great ski, but 184 is way too big for a 140 lb skier, no matter how hard you push it.  Wildcat is a big strong ex-racer and he uses a 172.

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/66258/2009-dynastar-contact-4x4

People will tell you 172, but you might like a 178.

You won't find those cheap.  Before you spend that kind of money, be sure to demo.  You could get a quiver of very nice skis at a swap for the price of a pair of those.
post #22 of 24
Before you go to the ski swap, drop twenty bucks on a  Real Skiers member review subscription.
Narrow the search down to 10 or 20 skis on the basis of being able to handle your demands (ie. black skier icon for "expert" performance, speed range includes race, carving = 5 points, etc.).  Then buy the best deal at the swap that meets your needs.  You may end up with a quiver, 13-m ski for learning turns, longer radius for cruising, and pair of SGs for, well,  you know
   
post #23 of 24
If you aren't doing mach+ these days don't be afraid of at least trying mid-160s with an open mind for a carving ski...plenty of ski...

$.01
post #24 of 24
Modern top-shelf skis have a very stable feel.  The trouble is that you will be going mach+ on your 165 cm 13-m skis, and that's not healthy.
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