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bending at the waist in the bumps

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I've been skiing lots of bumps this week. Actually, I've been skiing lots of bumps this season. One of my persistant problems is bending excessively at the waist and not flexing enough at the knees as I reach a bump. I'm finding that fixing this isn't as easy as telling myself to "just stop doing that." I've read threads on this forum that discuss positive aspects of bending at the waist and flexing the knees, but I think my bending at the waist is so exaggerated as to be very counter-productive. When I try to exaggerate an active absorption on easy bumps, I'm told that what I really do is exaggerate bending at the waist. I guess I can think of several causes for this -- 1) looking down too much (guilty); 2) not extending my legs down the shoulder and back of the bump so that I have little range of motion left to absorb the next bump by flexing my knees (guilty); 3) excess tension in my back and/or my legs(sometimes guilty). Even when I'm skiing an easy bump line -- one that I don't think causes me tension -- I seem to have this problem.

So, I'm wondering if the experts here might have any ideas. First, am I correct in considering these possible causes for this problem? Are there any other possible causes I should consider? Are there any specific exercises you can suggest to help me overcome this problem (I think I bend excessively at the waist even when slowly traversing bumps)? Ideally, does anyone have a "magic bullet" solution -- you know, something simple to either think of or do that will set up a chain of events that will cause more functional absorption? I know I'm asking for way too much with that last question, but you never know unless you ask.

Thanks in advance for any advice. I'm on the snow most days, so I'm eagerly waiting to put good suggestions into practice.

Cheers,

stmbtres
post #2 of 29
How many turns ahead do you plan? It sounds like 3 or less. I plan ahead 6 turns. Not planning enough turns ahead means you have to react more quickly to each mogul. A longer sight line will give you more reaction time, and hence better technique. Also, keep those feet together.

If you're really skiing bumps most of the time, grab yourself a used pair of straight skis with good flex camber, like a Rossignol ST Comp or something. You can get a pair for under $50 with bindings. It's definitely worth it if you're skiing a lot of bumps. They let you get your feet close together more easily. If you decide they don't work for you, there are plenty of people (like myself) who search for that equipement. You might be able to sell them for more than you got 'em.

But the bigest thing is getting your line of sight farther out in front, at least 5 turns ahead, the more the better. I'm working on getting up to 7 myself.
post #3 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by stmbtres:
One of my persistant problems is bending excessively at the waist and not flexing enough at the knees as I reach a bump. I'm finding that fixing this isn't as easy as telling myself to "just stop doing that
Unrelated to technique you may have a tight body, particularly some muscles deep in the abdomen ('psoas) which connect the mid-back to the upper thigh. Pilates, hellerwork and rolfing are three things which may help with the psoas if you have eliminated everything else.

Let the board know how you get on.
post #4 of 29
Ok I am going to take a stab at this one. I too ski alot af bumps and this is also a problem for me. I suspect that your are too flexed. You do mention this. How about thinking of extending or standing taller on the backsides- this will give you more room to flex as the next bump approaches. Think an egxagerated(sp?)extension!!Stand tall!
Another thing I have tried is skiing the bumps with no poles.This is a great exercise!!
How about when you are skiing groomed runs. Are you also too flexed here? Take a good look at your boots too.I have had some work done on mine to help me stand taller.
I am sure that some of the more experienced instructors can add loads to this. I wish I had the magic pill for you!!
Terry
post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by MittersillManiac:
How many turns ahead do you plan? It sounds like 3 or less. I plan ahead 6 turns. Not planning enough turns ahead means you have to react more quickly to each mogul. A longer sight line will give you more reaction time, and hence better technique. Also, keep those feet together.
As I wrote, I bend non-functionally at the waist with too little knee flex even when doing a simple exercise like traversing a line of bumps. I don't think this has much to do with not planning my line far enough in advance. I'm wondering if part of the problem is that I have a tendency to look down, even when I'm prepared for a bump, and that may enhance my tendency to over-bend at the waist.

I'm not trying to ski zipper line most of the time, and I'm not trying to ski with a technique that requires me to ski with my feet glued together. I leave that for the kids, including one of my own, on the local Winter Sports Club freestyle team. Unless the experts really believe I should reconsider this, I'd rather stay away from solutions that require me to plan that many bumps in advance. While I guess planning a line that far in advance may be necessary if I'm skiing troughs and checking against each bump (even that's debatable, I think), that's just not the kind of bump skiing I'm after. Still, thanks for the suggestion.

I'm hoping the coaches will work me over in my bump skiing at the EpicSki Academy (yeah, that's a bit of a shameless reminder/plug for the Academy), but perhaps some of those coaches and others can give me some ideas in advance of the Academy? After all, I'll have lots of days on the snow before the Academy, and I'd rather stop reinforcing bad habits as soon as possible. Of course I get local advice, but I'm always impressed (and I'm not just sucking up to the intelligentsia here) with the level of analysis provided on this forum. I know asking for advice without even seeing me ski is an almost-impossible order, but I'm still looking for suggestions to try.

Nettie writes: "Unrelated to technique you may have a tight body." Yeah, I've wondered about that. I've always attributed a tight body in skiing to tension, but I'll look into the idea of musculature playing a role. Thanks.

TCarey writes: "I too ski alot af bumps and this is also a problem for me. I suspect that your are too flexed. You do mention this. How about thinking of extending or standing taller on the backsides- this will give you more room to flex as the next bump approaches." I like the idea of at least trying to focus on exaggerating the extension rather than the absorption. You also suggest practicing bumps without poles. I do practice that on occasion with some success. I think I'm more upright when I do that. I'm wondering if that's successful because I don't stay too flexed preparing for each pole plant when I remove poles from the equation. I'll work on exaggerating the extension today, and I'll ask a skiing buddy if he notices any changes when I try to exaggerate the extension. I'll also ask him to look for differences in my posture when I ski bumps without poles. Thanks for the idea. I'll let you know what I find out.
post #6 of 29
I suspect that you are keeping your ankles too rigid. They should be the first thing that moves. Looking down at your skis makes it harder to move your ankles. Try traversing the moguls, look at a tree on the other side of the run instead of at your skis, push your ski tips down into the troughs, and let the moguls push your ski tips back up. Your upper body should just float like a fairy while your skis make like a teeter totter underneath you. [img]smile.gif[/img]

You don't look at your feet when you walk, do you? If you ski faster than you walk, you need to be looking even farther out.

Have fun!
post #7 of 29
I'm no bumper, but a number of things came together for me after I started to visualize my head "on a wire" down the fall line. That is , keeping my eyes and head up at a constant height while the rest of me accomodated the changing terrain.

CalG
post #8 of 29
Just some thoughts on posture and skiing. First, for myself I find that if I'm bent at the waist there's nothng but muscle strength to resit the forces of absorbtion. If I keep my hips tucked under my torso, keep a long straight(er) spine and lengthen my neck and tuck my chin back a little, my upper bady is more skeletal and much stroger because of that, and this allows a more vertical movement up and down with less tendancy to fold over under force. With a more stable upperbody, my legs are able to be more active. This lines my upperbody over the contact point. Keeps my legs from havng to counter what my upperbody is doing thus freeing them up to do whats needed on the snow. To tuck your hips under, think of a string pulling down on your tailbone, and your belly button pulling in towards your spine. Don't forget to breath. Then think of a string pulling the crown point of your head upwards. It helps to pull the chin in and relax the shoulders too. Try this at home , then take it out on the snow, maybe groomers to start. See if you can feel a difference in your stance, turns, and posture, especialy below the hips. If it feels different than before, take this into the bumps and experiment with it. The most important part of this to me is the hips. Keep them tucked under as described. If you can't get a similar feeling on the snow with easy groomers as you do on the carpet, then maybe a bootfitter is needed to do an assessment. Look for forward lean adjustment and ramp angle issues. Something to play with that's not technique related but affects our technique. This is good for other activities too. Maybe Lisamarie would give her expertise in this direction. [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #9 of 29
MittersillManiac,

[ December 13, 2002, 07:07 AM: Message edited by: Wigs ]
post #10 of 29
MittersillManiac,
post #11 of 29
MittersillManiac,

If you are looking for long straight skis, I have a pair of 205 Volant SL that are brand new with bindings. If you are interested, drop me a note.---------Wigs
post #12 of 29
Hey Stmbtres,

I spent the ski season in 1980 skiing bumps at Steamboat. There is no end of practice for the aspiring bump skier there.

My advice is to check your suspension. Is it tight? It sounds like you are resisting the push from the ground as you meet the bump. A good exercise is to traverse back and forth across a field of defined bumps, just working on getting a match between your leg action and the rise and fall of the terrain. It's a game of PUSH. First you let the mogul push your legs into flexion (legs retract), then you actively push your feet down to the ground (legs extend).

Your legs have to be soft to be pushed up, which prepares for the extension down the other side.

If you can get the give and take from the leg, you won't need to fold at the waist.

Think of the torso and head as a box. You want the box to go down the fall-line on a smooth journey. The legs have to get short when the terrain is convex and long when the terrain is concave. Visualize what needs to happen, practice the movements out of the fall-line (in the traverse) and progressively tip the line of travel more down the hill as you get comfortable.

Don't think about pink polka dotted elephants! Concentrate on making the positive "replacement" movements, and forget about trying to NOT DO anything. Not doing only serves to reinforce the old ways.

[ December 13, 2002, 07:37 AM: Message edited by: nolo ]
post #13 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Ric B:
Just some thoughts on posture and skiing. First, for myself I find that if I'm bent at the waist there's nothng but muscle strength to resit the forces of absorbtion. If I keep my hips tucked under my torso, keep a long straight(er) spine and lengthen my neck and tuck my chin back a little, my upper bady is more skeletal and much stroger because of that, and this allows a more vertical movement up and down with less tendancy to fold over under force. With a more stable upperbody, my legs are able to be more active...
Ric,

Thanks. Similar thoughts as TCarey about remaining long and tall, but with more specific ideas about how to achieve that. Also, I think your focus is remaining tall with my upper body during absorption, while TCarey was focusing more on extension. I think both of you are on the same track of getting me to place more focus on a complementary part of bump skiing to flexing my knees for absorption. Hopefully, that might break the chain of improper actions that lead me to over-bending at the waist and may lead to more natural absorption. I'm a huge believer in supporting myself as much as possible with my skeletal system (stacking bones), but you give me specific ideas about how to achieve that in the bumps. Funny that you're suggesting I focus on the same things (hips... and feet, too) that I normally focus on when skiing groomed. Apparently, my skiing brain takes a vacation in the bumps. Despite these problems, I love skiing bumps. Masochistic? Dunno. Let's see how things go today. Lots of snow yesterday, so powder bumps are great conditions to practice new movements.

Have to run. Meeting a friend in half an hour to ski. Thanks, again.

[ December 13, 2002, 07:45 AM: Message edited by: stmbtres ]
post #14 of 29
Well, you're welcome. We have tendancy to get defensive in the bumps, whether we like them or not. If we lock our legs up, something's gotta give. Not hard to guess what. And if we already have our hips tilted forward, we're already away from being structural. At this point, any "perturbance" will have the greastest effect on the largest mass not aligned. I know for me, when I get my upper body movng fore and aft from folding or whatever, I do well just to hang on, let alone ski offensively. Let's say I'm using my structure to enhance my skiing.

Take this posture stuff and combine it with Nolo's post and tell everyone what you feel. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img] Don't tell us about the powder though. Right now we're hurting. :

[ December 13, 2002, 08:25 AM: Message edited by: Ric B ]
post #15 of 29
stmbtres, my teaching specialty is bump skiing and there are two very basic things that I find are the real root cause of skiers breaking at the waist.

One, is that these skiers do not have a good short turn on groomed terrain and do not use their poles effectively. No one can resist breaking at the waist in bumps if the turn size is incorrect.

The second problem is understanding that the bumps dictate everything and win all ties. Understanding where in the bumps to guide the skis and the tactics used on different shape bumps is the key to understanding what turn shape and size to produce.

Once these two things are addressed, most skiers do a fairly decent job in the bumps.

Incidently, I only look one, maybe two bumps ahead at a time. I am skiing with eye/foot coordination to determine what shape and size turn I am going to do based on the bump at hand. I really don't care much about finding a good line, all lines and bump shapes are good to me. I have never met a bump I didn't like.
post #16 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Pierre:
stmbtres, my teaching specialty is bump skiing and there are two very basic things that I find are the real root cause of skiers breaking at the waist.

One, is that these skiers do not have a good short turn on groomed terrain and do not use their poles effectively. No one can resist breaking at the waist in bumps if the turn size is incorrect.

The second problem is understanding that the bumps dictate everything and win all ties. Understanding where in the bumps to guide the skis and the tactics used on different shape bumps is the key to understanding what turn shape and size to produce.

Once these two things are addressed, most skiers do a fairly decent job in the bumps.

Incidently, I only look one, maybe two bumps ahead at a time. I am skiing with eye/foot coordination to determine what shape and size turn I am going to do based on the bump at hand. I really don't care much about finding a good line, all lines and bump shapes are good to me. I have never met a bump I didn't like.
Pierre,

From reading some of your previous posts, I know that you love bumps. I've been hoping you would chime in. I think (and I've been told) that I have a pretty good short turn on groomed and in smaller bumps. It's definitely the case that I could use help with tactics in the bumps. Hopefully that will come with increasing experience, and I have lots of opportunities for that. I've skied bumps for a long time, but I'm making a MUCH more concerted effort this year to improve.

Even my competitive bump skier son doesn't look way ahead in his line (and that's even when free skiing irregular bumps). An informal poll of his team tonight gave a similar consensus about not looking too far ahead in the bumps.

Still, I think that breaking at the waist is such an ingrained habit, that I do need to take special steps to stop. I was playing with some of the suggestions Ric B gave me this morning to at least make it harder for me to break at the waist so much. Something as simple as elevating my chin to force myself to think tall and not approach each bump almost primed to break at the waist really seemed to help. Things didn't change dramatically in one day, but the friends with whom I skied definitely noticed a difference.

In response to Nolo's earlier suggestion, I completely agree that it's impossible, or at least very difficult, for me to change any habit in a passive way. That's why I'm looking for active cues that can help me change. Unfortunately, focusing on having light feet, or thinking about keeping my head within a box as I'm skiing down a line, doesn't seem to do it for me.

I appreciate the help, and I'll also appreciate any further suggestions. I know that not all ideas are productive for all people. I also realize that even great ideas may take a while to incorporate into functional skiing -- there may be some regress before any progress. Fortunately I have opportunities to be on the snow quite a bit, and I'm motivated.

Thanks again, all.

[ December 13, 2002, 05:42 PM: Message edited by: stmbtres ]
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by nolo:
Hey Stmbtres,

I spent the ski season in 1980 skiing bumps at Steamboat. There is no end of practice for the aspiring bump skier there.
Mmmmmmm... Whiteout...Mmmmmmm!
Mmmmmmm... Twister.....Mmmmmmm!
Mmmmmmm... Ooops......Mmmmmmm!
Mmmmmmm...Vertigo......Mmmmmmm!
post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Cheap seats:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by nolo:
Hey Stmbtres,

I spent the ski season in 1980 skiing bumps at Steamboat. There is no end of practice for the aspiring bump skier there.
Mmmmmmm... Whiteout...Mmmmmmm!
Mmmmmmm... Twister.....Mmmmmmm!
Mmmmmmm... Ooops......Mmmmmmm!
Mmmmmmm...Vertigo......Mmmmmmm!
</font>[/quote]Yep,

Whiteout is in great shape. I've been skiing there a fair amount this week. At the moment, only the top pitch of Oops is open, so my last run of the day is usually the Daze to Oops, the first pitch of Oops, back to the Daze, then Vertigo, then down.

Now, when I can do that with that excessive bend in the waist...
post #19 of 29
stmbtres, I may not have made my thoughts clear enough in this statement of mine.

Quote:
One, is that these skiers do not have a good short turn on groomed terrain
Not all short turns on the groomed are created equal. What I really meant was most skiers who break at the waist in bumps do not have a short turn that is suitable for bumps and the place to develope that short turn is on the groomed.

I don't know that not having a well developed short turn suitable for bumps is the case with you. I am passing on my experience in working with many skiers who have the problem of breaking at the waist in bumps. Many of those same skiers don't have the problem in smaller bumps.

I hope this further clarification helps.

[ December 13, 2002, 08:15 PM: Message edited by: Pierre ]
post #20 of 29
Stmbtres,

Are you bending at the waist or tipping the torso forward at the hip joint? Hardly anyone actually "bends at the waist." Maybe this exercise LisaMarie mentioned would help. It exercises the transverse abs, I believe, which are core stabilizers. Pull the muscle right behind your belly button toward your spine and hold it there, but don't hold your breath. Try it and tell me if it helps, would you? (Since you have snow skiing in your state.)
post #21 of 29
Nolo, Ric B and Pierre are right on.
Turn type, skeletal stacking, ability to absorb and tactics (where you turn) all combined are some keys.
Do you bend at the waist when you hit the bump coming at you?
If you square up to the ski (upper and lower body not separated) and get static you have no choice but to fold at the waist when you hit.
A good short turn helps lots, like Pierre says. So keep 'em turning, keep the butt cheeks pointing back up the hill behind you and those legs turning underneath you no matter what.
Tactics are huge too. Before you feel comfortable turning everywhere, it can help to learn the easiest place to turn on a bump (the pivot point, or teeter totter spot). How's your tactics?
And while we're at it, what equipment are you on? is there flex in those boots? How much sidecut in the skis? How long are they? How stiff?
What's your mental state in that sea of bumps??? Dance or defend?
What a journey you're on! Keep at it, the rewards are big!
post #22 of 29
Cool, Stmbtres. Glad you could feel something different. I find that keeping my hips tucked under, which translates to not tilting the hips forward, which Nolo points out, helps with every thing from liftng simple dumbells in the gym to short turns on the groom to very definetly skiing bumps. I find it's crucial for good balancing in movement, on or off the snow. You've gotten alot of good advice here, have fun, and keep us posted. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

I'll add that I'm with Pierre also when it comes to looking down the hill. Just a turn or two is where I usually look, unless I'm in that zone where I become one with the mountain. Then I seem to look at everything and nothing at the same time.

Maybe that's why all those designer jeans are built for guy's with their hips titled forward. I think it must be a common problem.
post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by nolo:
Stmbtres,

Are you bending at the waist or tipping the torso forward at the hip joint? Hardly anyone actually "bends at the waist." Maybe this exercise LisaMarie mentioned would help. It exercises the transverse abs, I believe, which are core stabilizers. Pull the muscle right behind your belly button toward your spine and hold it there, but don't hold your breath. Try it and tell me if it helps, would you? (Since you have snow skiing in your state.)
Hi Nolo,

Yeah, I really meant to say that I find myself tipping my torso forward at the hip joint. In all honesty, I don't know if it's even possible for me to actually bend at the waist. Ric B mentioned pulling my belly button toward my spine in an earlier post as a way of encouraging me to keep my hips tucked under me. Are you suggesting doing the same thing off the snow as a strengthening exercise?

Ric B writes: "I'll add that I'm with Pierre also when it comes to looking down the hill. Just a turn or two is where I usually look, unless I'm in that zone where I become one with the mountain. Then I seem to look at everything and nothing at the same time.

Even though I just recently wrote a post that started this thread, I've actually been skiing bumps for a while. I've always considered it a near-myth to plan a line six or seven bumps down the hill. Maybe some do that, but I'm not even sure I could count six bumps ahead of me at a time [img]smile.gif[/img] .

Pierre, I take seriously your comment that not all short turns on the groomed are created equal. I can tell you that I'm not as practiced at short-swing turns as I am at short carved turns, but I think this is one where descriptive analysis in a written post really fails. I think I'll have to wait for on-snow coaching to help me figure this out.

In a sense, you (that's the collective you) have given me exactly what I need for the moment. I've been so focused on a specific set of feelings while skiing bumps, that I've been locked into a pattern that hasn't really produced progress in "fixing" my problem. You've given me suggestions for a changed focus that at least allows me to concentrate on different feelings. That's all I can expect until you're actually able to see me ski. I'm eager to work on this stuff for the next month and a half (despite my attempts to make this some pedantic analysis, it is fun!!!!), and then I'm really, really eager to meet you all and get some on-snow coaching at the Academy.

Well, the sun is just now peeking over Sunshine Peak here, so I'm off to get ready for a day of skiing with friends. I hope you all have a good one, too.

Cheers
post #24 of 29
Stmbtres, one thing you might try, and I may get into trouble with some on this, is to reverse the movements of a side slip with a pivot in a corridor. Instead of the traditional extention to start the pivot, start the pivot with a strong retraction of the feet and legs, acompanied with a strong rotary movement, leavng you short in the legs in the fall line and longest in the legs in the sideslip. try this on a decent blue groomer. Keep enough separation in the feet to allow them to work independantly. Take this into the bumps, with the short coming over the bumps and the long coming between. On the groom it's like making a scale you're standing on get lite, in the bumps you can allow terrain to help with this. It might help to get more pivot in your carved short turn in the bumps along with fexion and extetion. Have fun! [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

[ December 14, 2002, 08:09 AM: Message edited by: Ric B ]
post #25 of 29
Stmbtres,

By golly, Ric did indeed mention pulling the belly button toward the spine.

I am suggesting that you focus on this ONE thing while skiing, while watching TV, while driving, etc., to improve your core strength. If you're collapsing at the center, it sounds like this is your weak link.

In ski teaching, we try to find the one thing that if changed would change everything. Not knowing you, never having skied with you, I still feel fairly confident that this is the ONE thing.
post #26 of 29
stmbtres: you said a mouth full
Quote:
Pierre, I take seriously your comment that not all short turns on the groomed are created equal. I can tell you that I'm not as practiced at short-swing turns as I am at short carved turns, but I think this is one where descriptive analysis in a written post really fails. I think I'll have to wait for on-snow coaching to help me figure this out.
Actually that descriptive analysis is exactly where I am heading. Just in the last month or so the ideas of new techiques in bump skiing are starting to become very clear in my mind. I am starting to realize that skiing bumps when you are past the age of 35 and out of shape is not only possible but downright doable with shape skis and the correct technique.

Right now I plan on being at the academy in Utah. Question right now is drive or fly.
post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Ric B:
Stmbtres, one thing you might try, and I may get into trouble with some on this, is to reverse the movements of a side slip with a pivot in a corridor. Instead of the traditional extention to start the pivot, start the pivot with a strong retraction of the feet and legs, acompanied with a strong rotary movement, leavng you short in the legs in the fall line and longest in the legs in the sideslip...
Hi,

I don't quite know why you may get into trouble with some on this. I practice exactly what you suggest, on occasion. I guess this is what used to be called down-unweighting? It's so contrary to the way I normally initiate turns on groomed, that I practice it just for bumps. Some of this is beginning to sink in. Today was good, and I'm beginning to slowly (very slowly), but surely feel my knees flex more than my hips tilt forward in the bumps. I skied a line of bumps that's used by the local freestyle team for practice, and for the first time I didn't feel like my upper body was collapsing at each bump. Fun!

Pierre writes: "Actually that descriptive analysis is exactly where I am heading. Just in the last month or so the ideas of new techiques in bump skiing are starting to become very clear in my mind. I am starting to realize that skiing bumps when you are past the age of 35 and out of shape is not only possible but downright doable with shape skis and the correct technique.

Right now I plan on being at the academy in Utah. Question right now is drive or fly."

Great! I'm ten years past the age of 35, so feel free to use me as a guinea pig for teaching your new techniques! I'm not quite out of shape, but if that's a requirement, I'll immediately start popping Bon Bons in front of the TV instead of skiing.
post #28 of 29
Well Stmbtres, because there are some who say that rotary should no longer be considered an active skill, or even talked about for that matter. And from recent threads active flexion and extention seems to be debateable. Maybe I'm a little gun shy. :

As far as bumps go, if you're skiing a freestyle line then you're gettng it done. But as Pierre is saying there may be an easier way for you to get it done. There are more turns available in the bumps than just about anywhere else on the mountain (not my line, but very appropriate). [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #29 of 29
there's been lots of good advice on this thread already. however, the MOST important skill for you to learn is ABSORBTION. absorbtion is the key to life!!!

to be a good bump skier, you MUST force yourself to use your knees as shock absorbers. this need not be practiced in moguls. you should become aware of absorbing every little bump, or dip or ripple even on groomers. your goal is to maintain balance and even pressure on the snow, regardless of the snow contours. if you do master this, EVERY aspect of your skiing will vastly improve.

on a related note, be sure that your boots are properly aligned. else, your knees may not be able to flex properly when your skis are close together.

other than these things...practice, practice, practice! it's worth it because THE ZIPPERLINE RULES!!!!

[ December 15, 2002, 02:38 PM: Message edited by: Adema ]
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