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Breaking 90

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
That was my goal for this summer. I shot 89 this morning. That's the second 89 this summer. Last year I shot 88 one time.

Most of my scores have been 91-94. I probably average 72 holes a week.

The big learning this year has been keeping my head down. We got a Wii for Christmas and I played a lot of Wii golf, which taught me to snap my head up to see the screen to see if I had enough strength on the swing. That really messed up my schedule to get below 90.

My goal now is to break 90 more times than I don't and get my handicap below 20. I hope to have two more months at this second obsession before I have to start feeding my first obsession.
post #2 of 11
I shot even par on the little local 9 hole par 32 course the other day.  2 birdies & 2 bogies, but my first even par round ever!  On a REAL golf course I seem to shoot a lot of 91's & mid 80's.  My usual goal is 84.  My best is 81 a few times & would like to have the goal of getting in the 70's sometime.

Have you ever tried the Wii skiing?  It is like anti-skiing or worse... mono-skiing.  They should've hired a skier to help design it.  The bowling game is pretty realistic though.

JF
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

That was my goal for this summer. I shot 89 this morning. That's the second 89 this summer. Last year I shot 88 one time.

Most of my scores have been 91-94. I probably average 72 holes a week.

The big learning this year has been keeping my head down. We got a Wii for Christmas and I played a lot of Wii golf, which taught me to snap my head up to see the screen to see if I had enough strength on the swing. That really messed up my schedule to get below 90.

My goal now is to break 90 more times than I don't and get my handicap below 20. I hope to have two more months at this second obsession before I have to start feeding my first obsession.
 

That's awesome nolo. Good shootin
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
I hope to be where you are in golf in a couple of years, 4ster.

We have slalom on the Wii Fitnesss which is probably my favorite game, but you're right, it has little to do with real skiing except it's classified as a balance activity. I find snowboarding and baseball are the hardest. I love doing the body tests. What age will I be today? I've been anywhere from 24 to 67.
post #5 of 11
I play "Bogie golf" I play Bogie as par si if I shoot in the 80's I feel as if I shot under par. Your 89 is one under, GREAT!
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

That was my goal for this summer. I shot 89 this morning. That's the second 89 this summer. Last year I shot 88 one time.

Most of my scores have been 91-94. I probably average 72 holes a week.

The big learning this year has been keeping my head down. We got a Wii for Christmas and I played a lot of Wii golf, which taught me to snap my head up to see the screen to see if I had enough strength on the swing. That really messed up my schedule to get below 90.

My goal now is to break 90 more times than I don't and get my handicap below 20. I hope to have two more months at this second obsession before I have to start feeding my first obsession.

Awesome Joan.....You are an inspiration!
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

That was my goal for this summer. I shot 89 this morning. That's the second 89 this summer. Last year I shot 88 one time.

Most of my scores have been 91-94. I probably average 72 holes a week.

The big learning this year has been keeping my head down. We got a Wii for Christmas and I played a lot of Wii golf, which taught me to snap my head up to see the screen to see if I had enough strength on the swing. That really messed up my schedule to get below 90.

My goal now is to break 90 more times than I don't and get my handicap below 20. I hope to have two more months at this second obsession before I have to start feeding my first obsession.
 

Well done!!!

One of the battles golfers face mentally is getting comfortable with shooting scores that are below their norm but within their capabilities. When we get close that evil twin known as tension tends to creep in. Knowing how to ignore it and just focus on the shot at hand is a skill just as great as any mechanical one. Keep up the good work!!!

And remember it is just golf. I know, for me, that message is going to be heavily reinforced this week when I join a number of my PGA peers and we do a golf clinic then play a scramble at Fort Carson in Colorado Springs with soldiers of the 4th Infantry who are just returning from Iraq. What is a number on a scorecard compared to what they have experienced? Pretty irrelevent for sure.
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
I know, it's just a game. I played a round last week without the scorecard because I was getting kind of crazy about it. So many times this summer I have thought I should quit the game because I was experiencing rage, self-loathing, and all sorts of negative emotions; but then I would feel so sad about never being able to golf again, that I would vow to "be serene." Yesterday we were paired with a father and son about 12. Dad was just above scratch generally but had shot a 67 the week before, so he was no slouch. I really enjoyed playing with these guys. The dad was so gentle coaching his son, lots of positives, never let him get down. It rubbed off on me, apparently. At the end of the round when we were shaking hands, the dad said, "You hit the ball really well." I was walking on air with a compliment like that from such an excellent golfer. 

My golf buddy and husband Phil shot an 88, so that's another aspect that's been fun, both of us being obsessed with getting better at golf. Last week we played 18 in the morning, went home for lunch, and made another tee time for that afternoon, and played another 18. Since Last week we played 117 holes of golf and spent a few hours at the practice facility to boot. 

My friend the scratch golfer says there's no secret to getting better at golf. Take lessons, practice and play a lot. 

Kind of like skiing: take lessons, practice, and free ski a lot. 
post #9 of 11
Congrats Nolo!

Don't worry about breaking 90 so much as shooting bogey golf. It's a whole different and positive mental state when you know that a mistake on every hole is not hurting you. You've probably passed the state where you know the distances for your clubs and can rely on them when planning shots. The next stage is the good miss. Some might call this luck or course management, but it's really the difference between an awareness of your weaknesses versus a focus or fear on them. The result is that although you are still planning to hit offensive shots, your misses end up away from trouble vs into it. There are two main skill areas that can get you into this zone: shaping shots and the short game. Improving skills in either can get you onto the couple of extra pars side of the bogey golf zone.

I think there are secrets to getting better at golf and that those same secrets apply to skiing. One secret is deciding what pieces of your game need development and focusing your efforts productively on those areas. There are lots of golfers who go to the range and practice to get better, but either don't practice on the right things (e.g. just beating balls to make a better swing) or ingrain the wrong movements with their practice. Sure lessons can help this process, but there'a  difference between relying on an instructor to fix problems and using an instructor as just one tool in a plan to get better. That's the secret. Another secret is adjustments. Great skiers know how to make subtle adjustments to adapt to different snow conditions (e.g. using turn shape to control speed). Skiers can adjust turn size and edge angles the same way that golfers can adjust shot shape and length of backswing. Better golfers have a larger bag of tricks for adjusting to wind, bad lies, hazards, etc. Some may say that adjustments is not a secret because we all do it all the time already. But can your bag of tricks really ever be full?  How actively do you work to increase your ability to make adjustments and use those adjustments on course? Most golfers don't do this nearly enough and that's the secret. My final BS secret for today is great offense gets you birdies while great defense gets you lower scores. Most golfers focus much more on making great shots than they do on "preventing" extra shots from being added to the card. When you've got a 10 foot downhill breaking putt for par, do you play to hole it and maybe miss big or play to get it close and maybe hole it? The secret is that knowing when to take your medicine will lower your scores. In skiing, the skiers that constantly push the envelope are the ones that get injured the most. Knowing how to dial the intensity of your skiing back (or up) to the 80% level is this version of the secret for skiing.

In my quest to move from bogey golfer to single digit handicap, I've gone through dozens of different mini programs including lessons, training devices, acquiring distance measuring devices, changing clubs, changing balls, changing swings, developing new short game shots, changing swing thoughts, and improving emotional management (e.g. laughing at bad shots instead of destroying clubs). Although several areas still need lots of work (especially the last one), there is one inconsistent pattern. Sometimes these efforts work like putting a puzzle together. You can tell you're making progress but it takes a while to get measureable results and then all of a sudden a really good score happens. Sometimes they work like climbing a ladder. You get results right away and you can "see" more of the whole game from being higher up on the ladder.

Like you, I've accomplished my goal for this season and am now working to make the change permanent. I know that as winter approaches, the golf will get harder and my handicap will drift back up. But I do take solace in that, after all this hard work, I've finally beaten this #$#@^%%$ game to the point where I can now live in the fantasy that I am controlling the game instead of vice versa.
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks for some great tips, Rusty. One I thought of the other day--you can't play well if you're trying not to do something, or "don't go there" golf. Again, the same applies to skiing.  
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

Thanks for some great tips, Rusty. One I thought of the other day--you can't play well if you're trying not to do something, or "don't go there" golf. Again, the same applies to skiing.  

Absolutely. Always turn what you're trying to do into a positive. Instead of thing "don't sway" think "stay stable". Your brain can't process a negative. Try it.
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