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Technique question (I think Nolo would answer it best)

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hey Nolo,
I've been thinking about technique recently, and I'm stuck, so I was wondering if you could impart some of your most excellent wisdom, your highness. You see, I have this problem, and maybe you think it's stupid, but I guess you're the best one to help.
There are several threads going on at the minute about the same topic:
Bountiful threads on Balance
Some on Stance
A feastful on Feet
and machinations about Movement

But the most interesting one I have seen pop up all over the place is THIS ONE

it also appears as: THAT ONE

and even as: THE OTHER ONE

So, my technique question is: If there are nearly 4,000 members here, how come less then 50 have submitted nominations, and one of them is you (who tried to cheat by doing it 3 times), nominating yourself each time?
I mean, it's not going to be much of a vote if we don't have enough nominations. Can you help?

S
post #2 of 10
Fox,

I think it's rude and cheeky of you to expose my grasping for votes for the Best Instructor award and self-nomination for a special Tinkerbell's wand award.

In answer to your implied question, yes, the first thrust gets your hips over your feet at which point, assuming you are in authentic eccentric contraction, you will be able to access the stretch reflex that will "hit the G-pedal," as Marilyn Chambers advises in her classic undercover instructional video, Take a POWDER, Chowder.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by nolo:
In answer to your implied question, yes, the first thrust gets your hips over your feet at which point, assuming you are in authentic eccentric contraction, you will be able to access the stretch reflex that will "hit the G-pedal," as Marilyn Chambers advises in her classic undercover instructional video...
Nolo,
I'm not sure about this. Some of it makes sense, but some of it is just bunkum – a new-fangled, discredited theory. I mean I've heard talk of this "G-pedal", but I don't believe such a pedal exists. I mean, next you’ll be telling me to ditch my long straight skis for something shorter. My long skis have kept me happy for years. Can I be certain that satisfaction will be just as forthcoming with shorter ones?

S
post #4 of 10
The idea is that it's not the length of the tool, but what happens at the point of contact. Pay attention, boy! The whole system must be rooted to the ground through the CoP.
post #5 of 10
I'd have to agree with Nolo. The same concept applies to for all skis. Any I've ever been on has each had it's own "sweet spot", as I call it, that optimally accesses that ski's technical design performance potential. When the CoP hits the sweet spot it really is like stepping on the go/gas pedal. Somewhere a ski designer rolls over and grins in his sleep.

The really cool aspect of shorter shape skis is that you can stand on the gas for the whole arc, and in much smaller radius, than you could on the old longer (less sidecut) gear (unless you were going zip code to zip code). The sweet spot/CoP relationship is easier to find because the new skis have more effective edge working from the top of the arc (on the gas into the falline) and provide more distict feedback to the skier. Their capability to carve easier focuses energy back to the CoP, giving great feeling of support, where as older skid more skis disapate, or drain, energy from CoP. The new short shapes enable me to set up and allow what I used to have work to cause.

I've always had fun whatever gear I was on, but I would not go back to longer skis except for a specific unique application, such as racing DH or SG. Proportionatly, I now actually ski a greater range of length than I ever did. My old long GS/All-Mt skis were 3% longer than my SL (210/204), now my shorter GS/All-Mt are are over 8% longer than my SL (181/167). My holdover fat 88mm waist powder planks seem huge at 190cm.

Get some demo's and try'em, you might like'em.
[img]smile.gif[/img]

[ December 18, 2002, 12:44 PM: Message edited by: Arcmeister ]
post #6 of 10
Arcmeister,

Thank you for dignifying my post with your excellent explanation. I'm guessing that Fox will thank you also.

Did you cast a vote for the awards? The more the merrier!
post #7 of 10
That does it, I'm not letting my son see this thread.
post #8 of 10
I notice my skis are not as stiff as they used to be.
post #9 of 10
Maybe if you mash your Viagra into a paste, you could wax your skis with it and that might make them stiffer? :

Seriously tho,
The new skis are softer, longetudinally (along their length).
This is so that as you tip them to higher edge angles, they can more easilly bend into a deeper reverse camber that the greater sidecut allows, and is designed to work with, to maintain pressure distribution along the entire edge length (to carve turns).

However, I think you would find that our new toys have become torsionally stiffer (resistance to twist at tip/tail). This is because the wider tip/tail now have more leverage to twist off to a lessor edge angle than the (proportionatly) narrower waist of ski under foot. Torsional stiffness is what keeps tip/tail edge angles close to what you input to skis with your feet. Beginner skis tend toward softer torsion to so as to react slower and be more forgiving, while hi-performance skis are torsionally stiffer to provide presision, instant responce and more powerful edge grip on hard snow.
:
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
When I got my skis, they had a cover over the tip. I still keep that cover on most of the time, it keeps the tip more sensitive. I believe that many North American skiers have the cover removed permanently. Does this affect the transmission of feeling from the tip of the skis?

S
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