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Questions on: Ski bindings, ski helmets and light ski's

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Hey all, I've come out of my summer hibernation to prepare for the ski season. But I have a few questions on what to acquire. 

1. I'm looking into getting bindings put on a pair of Fischer watea 94's. Since they are a light ski I was considering light bindings. My father and I will both use the ski's and I'm not sure if our boot sole length is the same, but it is close. I have rail flex's on my Head ski's but they seem to be heavy, any suggestions will help.

2. I need a new helmet, I could probably find a good one without the suggestions, but I might as well ask right?

3. I've been saving some money and I want to buy a pair of shorter and light ski's for skiing on the bumps, moguls mostly. I want a fair amount of float in them as well. I've looked into the solomans because I've heard good reviews on them. I'm currently 5'10 so what length is appropriate I'm not sure for shorter ski's. 


Thanks for your time!

-Ben
post #2 of 8
Thread Starter 
 Oh and does anybody know of any good bootfitters in the Seattle Area?
post #3 of 8
 Hey spookfish, glad to see you back.
I was wondering where you went after this big win....http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/81462/who-wants-a-free-pair-of-skis/240

If it were me, I'd put Griffons on the Wateas. 
post #4 of 8
As a long time helmet wearer, this is my advice. They are all sized and shaped different. Even the same brand, same size and same style will fit differently from 1 helmet to the next. Make sure you try it and do so with your goggles. Not all goggles are helmet friendly.

Once, I got sized for a helmet at a ski show and then ordered it online. It didn't fit nearly as well as the one I had on at the show. A good fit is really important.
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
 Thanks for the advice, I'll go into a shop to try on helmets and buy em. A question on bindings, can they be slightly adjusted by a few mm's if they aren't railflex bindings? And yes I did come back, I wouldn't leave such a great forum! And I wouldn't take a free pair of ski's and then ditch ;)
post #6 of 8
Some of the new skis come with integrated binding systems. They are predrilled so they accommodate all sole lengths, which might make sharing easy. Just don't forget to adjust the settings if you are of different weight and abilities.
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spookfish View Post

 Thanks for the advice, I'll go into a shop to try on helmets and buy em. A question on bindings, can they be slightly adjusted by a few mm's if they aren't railflex bindings? And yes I did come back, I wouldn't leave such a great forum! And I wouldn't take a free pair of ski's and then ditch ;)

All bindings have some degree of adjustability, some more than others.  You can ask where you buy the bindings how much of a range the bindings have.

Robin, Spookfish has two pair of skis that are flat mount, so the bindings available to him will have less range of adjustability than a system binding, but that is not an issue for most people.
post #8 of 8
A few quick thoughts, at least on numbers 1, 3 and the (unnumbered) 4:

- There's probably an exception (there always is), but I'm not aware of any current binding that can't be moved at least a few mm. The only danger would be if you wind up with one boot at the end of the adjustment range, and the other beyond it. The typical shop might balk at mounting the binding for more than one pair of boots (or even acknowledging that more than one person will use the skis), but you can give 'em the shorter boots and tell them to make sure they're mounted with enough room to fit boots at least X mm longer.

- On the light-binding question - not to be prickly and someone who refuses to answer a simple question, but (a) I don't really know the answer and (b) I can't help it a little bit.

Which leads me to ask: why do you think you want a light binding? If it's just because the ski is light, I don't know that makes tons of sense. A binding is really close to the axis around which your ski rotates, so its weight doesn't make all that much difference in feel, at least in ordinary skiing. On the other hand, there certainly are situations were binding weight matters: most obviously if you're carrying the skis further than from the car to the lodge, and particularly if the place you're carrying them is inclined in such a way that you're going upwards. In other words: backcountry hiking (with skis on back, shoulder or feet) = light bindings favored. Ordinary skiing = not so much. I suppose there are other situations where binding weight is important, like doing inverted aerials, but I don't know if those are relevant. If your'e sufficiently backcountry-oriented, it might point you toward some choices like the Marker Duke.

- If you really want specialized mogul skis, you might want to look at something fairly straight. If you want to go cheap, you could even dredge up someone's pre-shaped-ski skis, which the market generally considers approximately worthless.

- As for bootfitters, in shops there's World Cup Skier Service and Sturtevants. There are a number of independent bootfitters around too. One who I hear good things about is http://www.custombootservice.com. He's certainly very thorough, at least from what I'm aware of second-hand. There are some others, though I can't remember their names off the top of my head, and some of them might be a bit more oriented to race/plug stuff than you might prefer.
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