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Another Video Clip to Critique

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Same runs as before. (I'm the last in the group)

Good point by "therusty". Based on how far we sink as we ski, Ankle to knee deep. (8-24" deep) now a little chopped up snow.

Video Clip
post #2 of 29
Unless it's my broadband connection, that clip is useless. Came out as a bunch of stills and some garbage.
post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 
Try again. I was updating the file on the server. It might have gotten corrupted in the datastream.

DC
post #4 of 29
I'm nitpicking here as your pow technique is nice and smooth.

Maybe try getting your hands a little further out in front and get even lower? Its a good relaxed technique for such mellow slopes and conditions but gotta wonder how it would be in more chopped up crud or in your local Tahoe cement
post #5 of 29
Real quick- Nice skiing I like the full movement DOWN the hill! My comments would be your lead seems to be only at the ski that I think puts you a little back, I would love to see you keep your inside ski back under you hip a little more by keeping the whole inside 1/2 a little stronger. This added lead seems to open up your stance a little wider than I personal like (visual appearance). It may inhibit you a little in tougher conditions (who knows?)

I agree that keeping your elbows in front of your torso would also keep you a little more centered (look better) and free up your torso as it seems to play a more active part in the turning force than it may need too.

Overall I am enviouse as the skiing looked like a lot of fun and you had no problem taking it to the slope. Great job and thanks for the video!
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
One Funny thing about this trip is that everyone was "teasing" me that they would have to be "digging me out" of the snow because everyone else was on "fat" skis. (most at 69 under foot or wider) while I would be "struggling" with my 65's (crossmax 10 Pilot) [img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 
And about that tip lead? Yeah, that was my Mantra all last season and it's still a focal point. Still working on it as you can see.
:
post #8 of 29
nice dchan....
Just the balance_thing to the minor extent(as mentioned)...and you could have easily driven around the lefthand side of that little shrublet at the very end of the previous clip.
Think you can ship some of that white stuff up to Maine? : : :
How bout' trying for a little air if you can find takeoff and landing zones.... [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #9 of 29
In general, good, but a bit stiff and IMO, hips are a bit far back.

I'm thinking more angulation. There's many sections that would have benefitted from it, and made it look much less stiff.

It looks like bending deeper at the ankles could help. There are moments when it appears that you are bracing against the fall-line, and stiffening and straightening up. Especially evident when you get back too far in clip two, as you ski by the camera and the terrain gets steeper. Suggest you try a run while lifting your toes to the top of the boots.

Man, I wish I could be there!
post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by BigE:
In general, good, but a bit stiff and IMO, hips are a bit far back.

I'm thinking more angulation. There's many sections that would have benefitted from it, and made it look much less stiff.

It looks like bending deeper at the ankles could help. There are moments when it appears that you are bracing against the fall-line, and stiffening and straightening up. Especially evident when you get back too far in clip two, as you ski by the camera and the terrain gets steeper. Suggest you try a run while lifting your toes to the top of the boots.

Man, I wish I could be there!
Couple of questions, (for my MA understanding)

More angulation? you mention sections that would benefit but what would more angulation gain?

As far as toes against the tops of my boots, They probably are in these runs. That was my Mantra early last season. In Powder and crud it's pretty much automatic now. If anything there might have been a few moment's in those runs I let my toes drop (although I can't tell you where) but I generally keep my toes up now. I seem to get better feedback, better balance and quicker response.
post #11 of 29
Nice skiing dchan, but I am going to compare you with a Level III instructor (I assume that you are striving to get there). I would like to point out 2 areas where you need work:

1) You are a little too stiff (as BigE mentioned). There should be more absorption in your legs. Your knees rarely flex to absorb some of the rough cruddy terrain. You sometimes get thrown in the back because of that.

2) Your turning seems to have a large rotary component. Instead of letting the tips of the skis be turned, you rush the turn.

A result of the 2 observations above is that your upper body tends to sometimes turn with the lower body. The rigid approach prevents you from having a decent upper-lower body separation. That is how I see it.
post #12 of 29
I don't see a whole lot wrong with your skiing. I see a little one-two in a few turns, and a little heel push in others, but overall, I'd score you very highly.

I LOVE your upright stance. You show a lot of great skeletal alignment right over your skis (yes, in a couple of turns you are a bit in the back seat, but, no big deal). One of the issues with a lot of skiers in powder is that they bend over too much or have a very low stance thinking they can absorb better, when it's the other way around. A taller stance lets you absorb better.

I think this is Level III skiing for sure. Continuous movements down the hill, grace and style. Yes, I like it.

Bob
post #13 of 29
dchan very nice powder skiing.

There is bit of banking but quite acceptable in powder. I wouldn't worry to much about that.

What I see is patience and turn shape. The top of you're turns is much sharper than the bottom of you're turns. That makes it a bit hard to keep up with you're skis in a progressive manner. As a result you fall into the back seat in the second half of the turn and are not forward enough to initiate the new turn using enough independent leg action. You replace independent leg action with a bit of upper body rotation.

Slow mo the top of you're turns and tip over the skis like you were getting off the lift or going over a lip. That should make it easier to keep up with the skis and reduce the other inefficiencies.
post #14 of 29
WVSkier: I think this is Level III skiing for sure. Continuous movements down the hill, grace and style. Yes, I like it.

With all due respect to dchan, who is a fantastic skier by all accounts, this is a little shy of Level III skiing.

Bob, if you want to see what Level III skiing should be like, come the the ESA and take a look at people like Arcmeister, Ric Reiter, Bob Barnes, and several other pros. I wish there was some video of these instructors skiing Snowbird so that everyone can see what they look like.

Now that I have attended ESA I & II, I have altered my perception of what really good skiing should be like. I may never be able to attain that vision, but I certainly can demand it of a Level III instructor.
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by dchan:

More angulation? you mention sections that would benefit but what would more angulation gain?

As far as toes against the tops of my boots, They probably are in these runs. That was my Mantra early last season. In Powder and crud it's pretty much automatic now. If anything there might have been a few moment's in those runs I let my toes drop (although I can't tell you where) but I generally keep my toes up now. I seem to get better feedback, better balance and quicker response.
My apologies, for lack of clarity. Please feel free to disagree with my views as you wish. I'm just making some comments, and have no interest in getting on anyone's bad side.

More angulation done right would help in many ways:

One: Enhanced seperation of upper and lower body enabling you to ski with only your legs.

Two: Feet will move closer together. IMO, a bit wide for the conditions.

Three: Obviously, remove the banked turns, in which there is a tendency to put too much weight on the inside edge of the uphill ski. Once this happens, balancing movements stop.

Four: End of the stiffness -- which puts you a bit far back.

IMO, the toes thing is supposed to promote dorsiflexion, and keep you out of the back seat. Raising the toes only while keeping the foot down is not the goal. Perhaps my suggesting is better stated as pulling the top of the foot to the boot?

What more can I say?

IMO, the first video was far far better, except that the poles were not carried strongly, and were sometimes planted after the turn had already started.
post #16 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by TomB:
WVSkier: I think this is Level III skiing for sure. Continuous movements down the hill, grace and style. Yes, I like it.

With all due respect to dchan, who is a fantastic skier by all accounts, this is a little shy of Level III skiing.

Bob, if you want to see what Level III skiing should be like, come the the ESA and take a look at people like Arcmeister, Ric Reiter, Bob Barnes, and several other pros. I wish there was some video of these instructors skiing Snowbird so that everyone can see what they look like.

Now that I have attended ESA I & II, I have altered my perception of what really good skiing should be like. I may never be able to attain that vision, but I certainly can demand it of a Level III instructor.
No disrespect taken.. I'm aware there are flaws and My goal is to get rid of them so bring on the tips and hints.

As far as Arc, Ric, Bob, Rob, Weems, etc, I would put them way past LVL3 and I would hold them to a higher standard. They are the ones that set the example for us level 3 candidates and LVL3's to attain. They are our trainers and examiners.

Really grest skiers, Yes. but don't expect all level 3's to be able to ski at that level. Give them/us/me time and experience.

As far as video? the only one I have is of Rob, Weems, and Eric (although Eric is in a different "speciality"). They will be posted when I finally get a few more days to play with the video.

PS: did anyone catch the name of the software (vendor and name) that was given away at ESAII by Rob? I'm looking for a copy for my use.

DC
post #17 of 29
Thread Starter 
BigE

Thanks for the clarification. It's clearer now what you were trying to say. (Can't say I agree with all of it (yet) but I'll play with them, see what works for me and go from there)

FYI When you mentioned toes against the top of the boot I undersood exactly what you were trying to say. and I would say I was doing what you were suggesting. Perhaps those time you thought I was "back" were those times I had a lapse in that movement and was trying to "catch up to my skis" rather than have my skis catch up to me.

For those who think this was good skiing, should indeed ski with Ric, Bob, Rob, Arc, etc.. their skiing in the same condiditions make me look simply as bad as I felt making these runs.
post #18 of 29
dchan,

You are absolutely right when you say that our instructors at the ESA are way above the average Level III instructor. Since the ESA is my only experience taking any lessons, I probably have a higher standard than I should. I guess I have been spoiled with the ESA experience.

Nevertheless, I am glad to see that you take any and all criticism with a very positive attitude. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by dchan:
BigE

Thanks for the clarification. It's clearer now what you were trying to say. (Can't say I agree with all of it (yet) but I'll play with them, see what works for me and go from there)
Hope it helps in the end, even if you discard it all! It's very courageous to put such videos on the 'net. Keep it up! Watching it and reading the comments helps everyone.
[img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #20 of 29
Maybe you could try some drills that would focus your upper body more to the fall line. That should correct the rigidity of your upper body.
Do you feel easily fatigued when skiing powder? It seems to me that you do a lot of work with your leg muscles! But i am not so sure.
Otherwise your style is really nice to watch at! [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #21 of 29
dchan,

I think BigE's assessment is pretty accurate. All 4 of his points would make you look less 'static'. I know you're really a fan of the wide stance, but it doesn't look right unless you're going to generate some bigger angles. You could just as easily achieve the same angles you're getting now with a narrower stance. If you're going to use the wide stance, take advantage of it.

My personal mental cue for increasing angulation is pushing my outside shoulder down (don't push it lower than your inside shoulder, i.e. don't go past level). It limits my banking, increases angulation (through upper and lower body separation), and it starts an early arm swing for a pole plant. It may or may not work for you, I know a lot of people don't like it - its something to try for a few spare minutes some day.

Like you, I'm also a big fan of pulling the inside foot back. But you need to make sure you flex your knee before doing it. Think about knee forward - foot back while tipping (and guiding a little).

If you don't flex your knee during the lightening (or lifting if thats your thing) phase and just pull the inside foot back, the inside leg feels blocked inside and it results in banking and loss of counter. Your legs look pretty stiff, you may want to give the knee thing a try. When its done right, it feels like that inside foot/ski is way underneath you. Furthermore, having the knee bent and stacked inside lets you really increase edge angle of the inside ski (which as you know increases edge of the outside or stance ski).

[ February 16, 2004, 05:55 PM: Message edited by: Matter ]
post #22 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by TiLT:
Maybe you could try some drills that would focus your upper body more to the fall line. That should correct the rigidity of your upper body.
Do you feel easily fatigued when skiing powder? It seems to me that you do a lot of work with your leg muscles! But i am not so sure.
Otherwise your style is really nice to watch at! [img]smile.gif[/img]
Not fatigued at all in that UT powder. I find that I can ski all day in these conditions (25-30K vert ft) and be ready to go for more.

Not sure if that's a good indication of "technique" or conditioning.

The Nastar course was much more "work" than that powder skiing in my opinion.
post #23 of 29
See the thread "Dont lean on the front?" and read Weems first post on page 5. He explains exactly what I was trying to get across in much better detail.

I think that sequence would make you look more dynamic, get you more forward, and increase the edge angles you generate.
post #24 of 29
dchan:

I imagine you've already made the connection ...Matter and Weems are talking about the same thing we were working on with Rob in UT, although Weems has slightly different cues.
post #25 of 29
hey Chris, I didn't know you guys in Rob's group were working on the same stuff we were in Weems's group.

hope the skiing is going well back in Tiretown. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #26 of 29
Hi dchan,

From the clip it looks like you drop your left hand. Hard to tell for sure though.

[ February 18, 2004, 02:29 PM: Message edited by: PinHed ]
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by gonzostrike:
hey Chris, I didn't know you guys in Rob's group were working on the same stuff we were in Weems's group.

hope the skiing is going well back in Tiretown. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
Hi Gonz, yeah - in regards to the "more than you thinks" - I'd say Weems and Rob are on the same page ...the reference Rob used was that picture of Bode hanging in the Tram entry area.

Don't know about the skiing here! Haven't been able to get free during the day, and the local hill is a nightmare during nights and weekends, so I usually pass on those times ...CO, VT, UT, & NY have all been good though!
post #28 of 29
I think your stance is too wide for the incline of the slope..... at the knees especially. It's almost as though you look a little bowlegged during the turn. Also you could stay more square to the fall line to look a little more dynamic.
A good test of technique would be the same snow blanketing a moderate bump run.....see if you can ski that with good rythym. The way things are now I think your uphill ski would climb up the backsides and the downhill would slide even further downhill and back. I think your current stance could really limit your ability on steep terrain.....the uphill board would be way up the slope.....you would have to start using pedal turns before its really necessary.
post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thinking back on this now, no one mentioned the difference between my left and right turns.
It might have changed now that I had my boots worked on.

Does that play into any of the opinions?

I'll try to get a new video this week. I'm headed to Alta again [img]smile.gif[/img]
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