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Most Nimble Big Mountain Ski?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'm shopping for my first pair of big mountain skis and I was just wondering what ski is regarded as the most manuverable/nimble. I ask because i'm not the most nible skier to begin with and i would like these to perfom well during my limited time on the groomers. I'm looking at model years 2008 and 2009 to save money. Right now i'm leaning toward the Volkl Gotama. Any opinions or advice would be much appreciated.  
post #2 of 15
 Something either rockered or with an extended tip profile will help in the nimbleness. 
post #3 of 15
 I thought the 2010 Katana felt more nimble than the 2010 Goat.
post #4 of 15
Since the term "big mountain" is extremely relative (no pun intended), you need to define what you have in mind. Are you in fact talking about ripping big open faces at high speed, or just skiing bigger mountains than they have in Minnesota.  The Goats are a good all-around high end ski, but I think the Katanas require deeper snow and a little more horsepower to perform to their maximum abilities.  There are a lot of skis that their manufacturers lable "big moutain" that are very good skis, but you wouldn't want to take them up to real high speeds on steep terrain like the video heros on the Alaskan peaks.  If you give a little more clarification to your definition of "big mountain" you might get some better responses.
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

Since the term "big mountain" is extremely relative (no pun intended), you need to define what you have in mind. Are you in fact talking about ripping big open faces at high speed, or just skiing bigger mountains than they have in Minnesota.  The Goats are a good all-around high end ski, but I think the Katanas require deeper snow and a little more horsepower to perform to their maximum abilities.  There are a lot of skis that their manufacturers lable "big moutain" that are very good skis, but you wouldn't want to take them up to real high speeds on steep terrain like the video heros on the Alaskan peaks.  If you give a little more clarification to your definition of "big mountain" you might get some better responses.

I'll be using these for backcountry/powder skiing at Alta/Snowbird/Silverton this winter for sure and hopefully some heliskiing in the next couple of years. 
post #6 of 15
yeah, as soon as i saw the big mountain title.........  big mountian is, well big mountain. fast skiing on big faces, bowls. open steeps. Utah, AK, J-hole, etc.....  IMHO, I like Phils suggestion, rockered, something at least 10/20. There's a lot of skis to fit this bill. But follow below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

Since the term "big mountain" is extremely relative (no pun intended), you need to define what you have in mind. Are you in fact talking about ripping big open faces at high speed, or just skiing bigger mountains than they have in Minnesota.  The Goats are a good all-around high end ski, but I think the Katanas require deeper snow and a little more horsepower to perform to their maximum abilities.  There are a lot of skis that their manufacturers lable "big moutain" that are very good skis, but you wouldn't want to take them up to real high speeds on steep terrain like the video heros on the Alaskan peaks.  If you give a little more clarification to your definition of "big mountain" you might get some better responses.
post #7 of 15
should also define what you mean by "nimble."  My first thought was that you were looking for something that handled well in the trees and other tight spaces, but then you said

"I ask because i'm not the most nible skier to begin with and i would like these to perfom well during my limited time on the groomers."

Do you mean nimble off piste and also able to hold an edge on groomers or rather a "big moutain" ski that still does well on piste (without the need to be agile in tight spaces)?
post #8 of 15
Finndog:

If that was a question for me, the answer is "no."   I was mountain biking at 12,000 feet yesterday and it was 70 degrees.  The lows at night have only been about 50 in town and 40 up high, and we haven't had any significant moisture in almost two months.  MF
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEfree30 View Post

should also define what you mean by "nimble."  My first thought was that you were looking for something that handled well in the trees and other tight spaces, but then you said

"I ask because i'm not the most nible skier to begin with and i would like these to perfom well during my limited time on the groomers."

Do you mean nimble off piste and also able to hold an edge on groomers or rather a "big moutain" ski that still does well on piste (without the need to be agile in tight spaces)?

I'm mean in terms of dodging trees and other off piste fun. I just thought that something nimble off piste should probably be more nimble on. 
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gillette1 View Post

I'm mean in terms of dodging trees and other off piste fun. I just thought that something nimble off piste should probably be more nimble on. 

I understand why you'd think that.  But you'd be wrong.  The mechanics and dynamics of turning on soft snow are decidedly different than hard snow.  It's not that a ski that's nimble on one can't be on the other, but they certainly don't go hand in hand, and often counteract each other.

It also depends on whether you use "nimble" to mean "turny" (which undermines soft snow performance, and is the opposite of what most consider "big mountain") or "light" (which doesn't necessarily, although it can mean that the skis get tossed around too much to fit the big mountain category).

You might want to read Shane McConkey's "Mental Floss" for insight.
post #11 of 15
Mudfoot, I am losing you my friend. not sure if you meant to post this on another thread, the subject was skis for big mountain and I was complimenting/endorsing your post.  Sounds like a great day, Can I come on the next ride? :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

Finndog:

If that was a question for me, the answer is "no."   I was mountain biking at 12,000 feet yesterday and it was 70 degrees.  The lows at night have only been about 50 in town and 40 up high, and we haven't had any significant moisture in almost two months.  MF
post #12 of 15
he was responding to your signature!

"Is it snowing where you are yet?"





Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post


Mudfoot, I am losing you my friend. not sure if you meant to post this on another thread, the subject was skis for big mountain and I was complimenting/endorsing your post.  Sounds like a great day, Can I come on the next ride? :)


 
post #13 of 15
Time for another cup of cofee....  Thanks bro'
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDad View Post




I understand why you'd think that.  But you'd be wrong.  The mechanics and dynamics of turning on soft snow are decidedly different than hard snow.  It's not that a ski that's nimble on one can't be on the other, but they certainly don't go hand in hand, and often counteract each other.

It also depends on whether you use "nimble" to mean "turny" (which undermines soft snow performance, and is the opposite of what most consider "big mountain") or "light" (which doesn't necessarily, although it can mean that the skis get tossed around too much to fit the big mountain category).

You might want to read Shane McConkey's "Mental Floss" for insight.
 
I think this sums it up and explains why it is hard to give you a specific recommendation without clarifying exactly what you are looking for.  Based on your nimble off piste desire, you probably want something with a moderate to softer flex, moderate length and decent width underfoot- as Philpug said, rockered/extended tip would definitely be worth considering and some would say (i.e. S.M.) reverse/reverse are the most nimble, but I haven't skied them (and their on piste performance would certainly suffer).

To answer Finndog's signature, the peaks here got a bit about a week ago, but it has melted off since.
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDad View Post




I understand why you'd think that.  But you'd be wrong.  The mechanics and dynamics of turning on soft snow are decidedly different than hard snow.  It's not that a ski that's nimble on one can't be on the other, but they certainly don't go hand in hand, and often counteract each other.

It also depends on whether you use "nimble" to mean "turny" (which undermines soft snow performance, and is the opposite of what most consider "big mountain") or "light" (which doesn't necessarily, although it can mean that the skis get tossed around too much to fit the big mountain category).

You might want to read Shane McConkey's "Mental Floss" for insight.

First, forget that I mentioned on piste skiing. I'm most interested in a highly/easily manuverable powder ski that would be great for dodging trees and exploring backcountry. I'm shopping for Gotama's right now, but if anyone has reccomendations for specific skis from model years 2008 or 2009 that would be great.
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