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Sock thickness - can you notice the difference? - Page 2

post #31 of 57
Yeah. I got a great pair of high performance long underwear bottoms on sale right after Christmas. They have a built in knee bend adjustment key that you can easily turn while riding the chairlift without having to remove your ski pants. The variable thickness weave in the fabric eliminates that annoying bunching up behind your knees and the cuffs have been designed to be compatible with most of the high performance socks on the market. Tighter weave stretch fabric integrated into the outside of the calves provides that needed extra support when you are tipping and engaging the outside edge of your inside ski during high speed carved turns, and the fabric in the upper leg is reinforced and cut and sewn on a bias to better assist your quadraceps in both high speed turns and during slow wedge turn demonstrations - a real selling point for instructors. There are also some interesting features built into the seat and crotch that I have not yet had a chance to take advantage of due to the abnormally cold winter here in New England.
post #32 of 57
David7, can you get 'em on a pro deal for less than $500?
post #33 of 57
Only $389 each if you buy three pair.
post #34 of 57
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by weems:
I've had my socks canted for more edge control. Thick side outside.
I had a really bad day's skiing the other day and couldn't work out why, until I took by boots off and realised I had the socks on the wrong feet! Duh!

J2R
post #35 of 57
Those socks with forward lean look nice, but I need left-footed canting too. The Burtons don't seem to offer that.
post #36 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by J2R:
until I took by boots off and realised I had the socks on the wrong feet! Duh!

J2R
That is so stupid and irresponsible. You should treat your body with more respect.
post #37 of 57
Socks are not a bad topic, and look what amazing things we have learned already. I go for the thinnest foot covering next to skin, and that's Lycra, because the next thinnest option would cause strangulation. I walk around the house in socks and Birkies and I can feel a crumb of coffee grounds underfoot, so I think we underestimate our ability to feel through footwear. Still the quality of feeling between the bare foot and the booted one is rather large. I believe I get a better feel with the minimal amount of buffer between my bare foot and the boot liner.

So long as my boots are warm when I put them on, my feet never get cold.
post #38 of 57
Speaking of lycra, someone told me that they like lycra underwear.

I need to get something other than cotton underwear for warm days.
post #39 of 57
I absolutely notice the difference. I bought a new pair of "thin" ski socks that were on sale. After one day in these socks my feet were killing me. I had to ice them down when I got home. The fit was way to tight and the socks were not as thin as my old socks. Went back to my old thinner socks and things are much better on the feet.
post #40 of 57
So nolo, are you saying it's feelings, nothing more than feelings....
post #41 of 57
On a more serious note...

if you are unable to feel the difference between thin and thick socks, I would say that your boots are too big. By this I don't necessarily mean too long, which may also be the case, but too much volume. You would at least notice a difference in the adjustment of the two lower buckles.

There also does not seem, at least in my experience, any noticeable difference in warmth because of sock thickness. I suppose this is because the liner provides the bulk of the insulation.
post #42 of 57
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by peak203f:
There also does not seem, at least in my experience, any noticeable difference in warmth because of sock thickness. I suppose this is because the liner provides the bulk of the insulation.
When skiing in some pretty cold temperatures (-18C or 0F) in Fernie a couple of weeks ago I was forced to wear an extra pair of socks - thin lambswool ones. I certainly noticed the difference then.

J2R
post #43 of 57
I personally hink it's the boot's job to connect your foot to the ski with the most responsiv interface possible and a thick sock dcertainly doesnt help, though many will also argue whether or not it actually hurts. What I would like to see is a thin water proof liner that fits over the boot, like you can get for cross country shoes, to keep snow from building up on your boots and from your shells getting excessively cold and stiffening, in addition to reducing freezing of your feet on extemely cold days. Anyone seen anything like that?
post #44 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by Karsten Hain:
What I would like to see is a thin water proof liner that fits over the boot, like you can get for cross country shoes, to keep snow from building up on your boots and from your shells getting excessively cold and stiffening, in addition to reducing freezing of your feet on extemely cold days.
You mean like the neoprene ones someone used to sell??
post #45 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by Karsten Hain:
I personally hink it's the boot's job to connect your foot to the ski with the most responsiv interface possible and a thick sock dcertainly doesnt help, though many will also argue whether or not it actually hurts. What I would like to see is a thin water proof liner that fits over the boot, like you can get for cross country shoes, to keep snow from building up on your boots and from your shells getting excessively cold and stiffening, in addition to reducing freezing of your feet on extemely cold days. Anyone seen anything like that?
They have boot gloves for that.

Boot Gloves
post #46 of 57
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by J2R:
When skiing in some pretty cold temperatures (-18C or 0F) in Fernie a couple of weeks ago I was forced to wear an extra pair of socks - thin lambswool ones. I certainly noticed the difference then.
By which I mean a difference in temperature, not control - I'm not suddenly answering my own question!

J2R
post #47 of 57
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Karsten Hain:
I personally hink it's the boot's job to connect your foot to the ski with the most responsiv interface possible and a thick sock dcertainly doesnt help, though many will also argue whether or not it actually hurts. What I would like to see is a thin water proof liner that fits over the boot, like you can get for cross country shoes, to keep snow from building up on your boots and from your shells getting excessively cold and stiffening, in addition to reducing freezing of your feet on extemely cold days. Anyone seen anything like that?
You could check out the Danzat Insulating Boot Covers at:

http://www.harbskisystems.com/gearboot.htm

They do rather make your boots look like paws, but some people might find that rather fetching.

J2R
post #48 of 57
The sock I'm using now isn't knitted with greater forward lean, but it is knitted with right and left foot form in it for a closer foot fit. It has little "R" and "L" embroidered on it. I like them so much I bought a couple dozen pairs. While my skiing has imporved this season, I doubt the socks have anything to do with it.
post #49 of 57
Thanks J2R and Scalce, both look like really good products. I think I am going to look into getting a pair.
post #50 of 57
just wondering:

since about 100% of the replies indicate they wear, or prefer to wear the thinnest ski sock available (and I agree)- why the heck is 90% of the stock in store not that, I mean at least moderate thickness? Who buys this stuff?
post #51 of 57
Steve_s, the answer is quite simply people like my parents, buying them for me for christmas. A lot of people who aren't "in the know" and a lot who are but who simply believe diferently then most others or prefer thick socks or who make up slack inside their boot due to poor fit. I think, however, mostly those who are not gear nuts, or even serious skiers.
post #52 of 57
Once you've had thin, nothing else goes in!

[img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
post #53 of 57
I'm using a moderately thick sock, as my liners have packed out too much for a good fit with thin socks. I started thin, but had to go thicker as time went by.

Time, I guess, for some new liners.
post #54 of 57
Now .... as to color enhancing performance ...
post #55 of 57
If you have to buckle your boots(or at least buckle them past the first notch) they're too big or your liner sucks-socks? go barefoot and save money for a ski lesson
post #56 of 57
I'm like Harry. I was foamed in stockings. Now I'm in the thickest Thorlos. Even the normal Thorlos are no good any more, my foot flops and rolls in the boot. I'd rather thin socks, but it's just not going to happen. As soon as I have to do up the boots tighter in the lower foot, the boots get too narrow.
post #57 of 57
Let's talk brassiere's, shall we? Talk about forward lean and packing out! Harumph!
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