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Single quiver - All Mountain/Free Ride ski

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I've skied for 40yrs and still ski anything comfortably in or out of the resort and feel I could still place myself as an L8 skier (it's all subjective anyway -- but a very strong skier in any terrain/conditions). I'm 6'2" and after these past few years have trimmed down to 190/195lbs now.  Skied for years at Alta/Snowbird/Park City, closer to home now is Fernie, Lake Louise, Panorama and love to ski Kicking Horse & Revelstoke (GREAT Resorts) if you've skied any of those.  I really enjoy a wide range of terrain, chutes, bowls, trees, morning groomers, bumps, and powder-bumps -- its all good.

I can't afford multi ski collections (with a family of 7 skiing) so I'm looking for a great all around ski from somebodies left over stock from last year.  I skied and LOVED my Bandit XX's 191cm (original model) for years.  I beat the life out of them until they broke in '07/08.  last year I borrowed a friends B2's found they weren't too bad but nothing great, later busted (bent) another friend's Volant PowerCarves (wasn't wild about them).  Didn't really care for the Head Monsters I demo'd.  I did a couple of runs on a pair of Nordica Nitro demo-day and found them to be a fun ski that seemed to do bumps and carve groom pretty good (could try the off-piste stuff but the rep says they're great there too) and probably have them at the top of my list.  I find many of the mid-fats hold an edge too long in the bumps etc and tend to climb the back of the bump and these Nitros did nice job (like my Bandit XX's) in it all. 

The other skis that sounds good is the Volkl Gotama's or Rossi Phanton SC97's -- what are your thoughts on the Nordica's, Volkl's or Rossi's (absolutely Loved my original Bandits!!!) or are there other skis you would suggest I look at?
 
Thanks for any advice/direction
post #2 of 26
Mantra
post #3 of 26
I have Icelantic Nomads for my ' 80% ' ski - I've never skied them on ice (don't get that very often out here) and they're probably not as floaty as you might want in really deep powder, but I enjoy them on groomers, steeps, soft bumps , trees and moderate powder.  They are very similarly sized to Gotamas (True size is 140, 110, 130 vs 133, 105, 124 for the Gotama).  I found them very nimble & fun.  Icelantic is offering a softer model this year (there's a current thread on this in the gear review forum).  I am 5'10 & 160# L8/9 and  enjoy my 156's (yes 156)  They make them in 168 & 181 as well which would be more suitable for someone your size.   Seardch the threads here & TGR for reviews.

Just my 2c.
post #4 of 26
I demoed 2010 Blizzard Magnum 8.1 IQ Max and absolutley loved them - planning on buying.  Sounds like I'm a level or so below you in ability, but hoping these skis will get me there!  Designed for "advanced" skiers. These are 81 under foot, they also come in 8.7 (87 under foot).  Doesn't sound like too much changed from 2009 model, and there's some good deals on the '09s right now.  I noticed that Blizzards werent on your list, but they've been getting great reviews.  I also demoed the Nordica Nitro's and Head Monster's and I enjoyed the Blizzards much much more !
post #5 of 26
 Fischer Watea 94
post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILOJ View Post

I demoed 2010 Blizzard Magnum 8.1 IQ Max and absolutley loved them - planning on buying.  Sounds like I'm a level or so below you in ability, but hoping these skis will get me there!  Designed for "advanced" skiers. These are 81 under foot, they also come in 8.7 (87 under foot).  Doesn't sound like too much changed from 2009 model, and there's some good deals on the '09s right now.  I noticed that Blizzards werent on your list, but they've been getting great reviews.  I also demoed the Nordica Nitro's and Head Monster's and I enjoyed the Blizzards much much more !

Dimensions are the same for this upcoming season but they changed the IQ to IQ Max, this allows a Jester style toe vs. the traditional Marker toe, the ski feels laterally more responsive. 

For a western all mountain ski, I would go into the 90mm+ waist range. I like the previously mentioned skis inc the Icelantics and Volkls I would also add the very sweet although expensive Kastles to the shopping list. 
post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies everyone. It is very helpful to hear and talk about the different skis.  almost all of which I've never personally skied -- so it is hard to conclude on something that is so dependent on personal taste.  Here is what some of what I concluded -- please feel free to interject with thoughts and opinions

Volkl Gotama -- Here is what Ski Mag says about it - "Best For: Smearing, surfy style in deep snow; Not For: Hard-snow carving or tight-spot quicknessthe."   The Mantra looks more like my beloved Bandit XX's (rest in peace) and with a better side cut for skiing the bumps and front-side of mountain but fully enjoyable/capable on the back-side and trees (thanks MntnTom)

Notica Nitrous - Here's what Ski Mag says - "The tester favorite earns praise for its balance of performance attributes. Carbon-reinforced laminates give it outstanding quickness, and it’s eminently calm at high speeds. ... With a wide, stable platform and a broad tip that dives obediently into arcs, it’s a natural carver with excellent soft-snow skills."  Still looks like a good one to me

Talking to my local Ski buddy -- old ski sales guy -- he says the ski for me is last year's K2 Outlaw that the shop here has for 1/2 price.  It sound like a great ski and think I might go for it -- just hate to buy something I've never tried -- but the price is right in the economy we're in right now.  Anyone tried these to offer any thoughts.  Another one he likes is the Line Prophet 100's but I think that steps back to the Gotama area again -- which would be fun for many days but not for all days.

Sorry gotta cut this short -- heading out the door for the weekend.  please post any thoughts you may have.  Thanks, 
post #8 of 26
VOlkl mantra is a great all around ski
post #9 of 26
 Not a fan of the Nitrous at all. The Prophet 100 and even the Outlaw are much nicer skis. 
post #10 of 26
 188 Lib-Tech NAS Freeride.

That's been my everyday ski for the past 2 seasons. It's moderately stiff, has a 93/99mm waist (wavy edges due to "Magnetraction"), has a 19 turning radius and the aforementioned "Magnetraction", which seems like a gimmick, but in reality works quite well in terms of edge-hold (I rode mine about 50+ days before even getting a tune on 'em and they gripped hardpack as well as any other ski I've owned).

Again, they often get over looked by "serious" skiers because of the "Magnetraction." It kills me that some folks can be so small-minded as to only look at the "gimmick", yet this very same technology has been heralded by snowboarders who have been utilizing the patented edge-hold of Lib-Tech for years. Think about it, snowboarders only have 1 edge, so if they love Magnetraction, it must work.

While I'm not a fan, a lot of my riding partners favor the PM Gear Bro, which has a 99mm waist and is fairly stiff. Comes in a variety of sizes. These same folks use the Bro as their all-around ski and then have a reverse camber or rockered powder ski (I have the Lib-Techs as everyday and a pair of Spatulas for powder, for example).

At any rate, that's my 2cents. 

The NAS (Narrow-Ass Snowboards) may get crazy looks for more traditionally minded skiers, but the dang things can lay down some nice railroad carves, handle fairly well in light pow, and are fun and stable.
post #11 of 26
Assuming you want a response based on your stated preferences in your first post: Volkl, Rossi or Nordica...I'd lean toward either the Volkls or Rossignols.  Given that you like a wide range of conditions, I think your best bet would be looking at models with a 90 to 105mm waist.  For Volkl that is the Bridge (92mm), the Mantra (96mm) and the Gotama (105mm).   In the Rossi Freeride Line you'd be looking at the S5 (98mm).  All are highly regarded skis.  The next level in your decision tree would help narrow it further.  If you think you lean more toward on-piste than off...I think that pushes you down closer toward the Bridge or Mantra.  If POW and off-piste is the bias you need then I would suggest the Gotama or S5.  For full disclosure, I own the Gotama and Bridge and like them both a lot.  The Gotama does carve very well on groomers but doesn't like ice very much.  The Mantra is stiffer than the Gotama and can really rail groomers but doesn't perform as well in the POW.  People I know who have skied the S5 love it as well.  My suggestion would be figure out which way to lean in this class of ski and then simply jump on the best deal you can find from last year's skis.  Both Rossi and Volkl are not cheap and I don't recommend paying full price on either.  
post #12 of 26
 I like my Gotomas as a one quiver ski.  I think they work very well on groomers, even firm groomers.  I don't have a lot of experience with them on ice.  I suck on ice anyway.  I haven't skied than Mantra, but feel like I would prefer the Goat in most conditions.  Most people I know prefer the Goat, although some very good skiers like the Mantra for a 1 quiver ski.
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutorq View Post

 Fischer Watea 94
Yeah, a real nice choice. 
post #14 of 26
2nd the nomads. end of story, does it all. and its easy to find them after lunch on the rack!  :)
post #15 of 26
Have a look at the Movement Sluff in a 184. It's 134-99-118 with a 22m radius and weigh 2.02kg per ski.

Good review here on TGR really sums up the ski well. Ignore the talk of a 194, it never made it to press, too few orders to justify a mold.

They are really gaining a cult following in BC. ROAM in Nelson has built a legion of devout fans by running demo's up at Whitewater monthly. At the resort in Revelstoke they have added the Sluff to rental fleet as their high-end ski. A large number of the guides at Selkirk Tangiers have chosen them as their personal ski.

The ski has a wonderful flex. It hand flexes soft in the tip but never feels floppy on the snow. The flex ramps up fairly progressive to stiff under foot and back out to soft in the tail. The stiffness under foot is really helps the ski power thru variable snow. The construction is a full sandwich, wood core with unidirectional glass top and bottom. For added torsional stiffness the ski runs two beech wood rails down either side of the core.

For full disclosure I am the Movement skis technical rep here in North America.
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by shirk_007 View Post

For full disclosure I am the Movement skis technical rep here in North America.
Despite this last line, I have been itching to demo a pair.  They look like one of those close to holy grail skis that one can have fun in anything....
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbuzz View Post



Despite this last line, I have been itching to demo a pair.  They look like one of those close to holy grail skis that one can have fun in anything....
 

Where do you ski? There are not a ton of places that have demo's but I might be able to direct someone that has some.
post #18 of 26
STR:

In answer to your PM..........I'm not here much at all in the off season and am just sorta dipping my toe in the water today.

I have skied all the skis that you mention and most of the others so here's my $0.02.

First, I own a Gotama (love it) and a Mantra (don't luvit........heck.....don't even like it). There are lots of good skis in the range of high 80's to mid 90's that would work well for ya depending on your priorities. I live in Tahoe and ski about 80% or more off trail. If I had to choose one ski, I would want a balance of hard snow grip with off trail forgiveness and deepish snow capabilities. The Goat fits that bill fairly well but it is wide enough to be a little cumbersome if it hasn't snowed in a week or so. I'd probably choose a Watea 94 or possibly a Volkl Bridge in the 90-95mm width category.

But of course.....there are others.................
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

STR:

In answer to your PM..........I'm not here much at all in the off season and am just sorta dipping my toe in the water today.

I have skied all the skis that you mention and most of the others so here's my $0.02.

First, I own a Gotama (love it) and a Mantra (don't luvit........heck.....don't even like it). There are lots of good skis in the range of high 80's to mid 90's that would work well for ya depending on your priorities. I live in Tahoe and ski about 80% or more off trail. If I had to choose one ski, I would want a balance of hard snow grip with off trail forgiveness and deepish snow capabilities. The Goat fits that bill fairly well but it is wide enough to be a little cumbersome if it hasn't snowed in a week or so. I'd probably choose a Watea 94 or possibly a Volkl Bridge in the 90-95mm width category.

But of course.....there are others.................


 
I second the Volkl Bridge as a versatile performer, on and off piste, 92mm waist....

I happen to have a pair of new, unmounted, never skied 09 Volkl Bridges, 185 cms for sale, $300 shipped within the US, $325 shipped to Canada via USPS/Canada Poste...
Check it out....
post #20 of 26
No offense to SJ, but I've skied both the Mantra and the Gotama, and, unlike most, I prefer the Mantra. Just goes to show you should try them both.

I found the Mantra responded well to tipping because of its torsional stiffness and sidecut; the Goat wanted to be steered a bit more.

At 165 lb, I ski a 177cm Mantra, which I find provides me with plenty of float in the little bits of powder we get at Whitewater . My perspective, however, is warped, since I first learned to ski deep powder at Berthoud Pass, CO on 203cm skis that were about 67mm wide.

Anyway, I find the Mantra light, steerable and willing to carve when tipped and easy to bend in deep snow, despite their alleged stiffness. I ski trees regularly. I am a fairly slow and conservative skier, but I'm perfectly capable of going fast enough to generate the forces necessary to touch a hand down when arcing the corduroy.

The Mantra can be smeared, but it requires more accuracy with angle and pressure than the Goat to do so.

For bumps (which we don't have much of at Whitewater, but I've also spent plenty of time at Mary Jane, Colorado), I prefer a narrower ski than the Mantra, although the Mantra does OK on big, soft bumps.

I've skied the Movement Thunder for about a day and half, but not the Sluff. The Thunder is an excellent, versatile ski that responds well to tipping and accurate fore-aft weight distribution. It powered through crud nicely, but wanted a bit more room in the trees than the Mantra.

I've done a couple of runs on the K2 Outlaw as well. It skis very much like the narrower Recon, and, like the Mantra, it has versatility on its side. It's damp, and, with the system binding, heavy. It plows through crud quite well, but the Mantra is lighter and more lively, IMHO. Considering Lake Louise and Panorama are on your list, you might want to consider them. A lot of people don't like K2, though.

I haven't skied the Volkl Bridge or the Watea 94, but they could be excellent choices if you're not spending all your time at Revelstoke or in the sidecountry somewhere. Again, if I were skiing Lake Louise and Panorama, I would tend to choose something less than 100mm wide. But that's just me.

You'll probably find that any of the skis mentioned will be more lively than the old Bandits, but they might be more demanding, too. Demo if you can - preferably all day in a variety of conditions, not just a couple of runs. If you do get to demo multiple skis in one day, develop a top-to-bottom line that goes through as many of your favorite conditions as possible, and ski the same line with every pair of skis. Give each pair at least two runs.

Have fun!

My presence here indicates that a village somewhere is missing its idiot.
post #21 of 26

Keep in mind that the Gotamas for the coming season are going to have rocker for the first time, so they are not the same ski everyone has skied, and appear to be talking about here.

post #22 of 26
Check out the icelantic Pilgrim.

"The Pilgrim is a twin tip, highly stable, powerfully fun ski designed for hard packed as well as varied slopes.  Available in 151cm, 169cm and 179cm lengths, The Pilgrim features a soft tail combined with a solid flex and substantial sidecut.  This gives The Pilgrim the edge – literally.  Our own riders describe the Pilgrim as lightweight, playful and powerful – a tool that does it all!"
post #23 of 26
  I haven't skied K2s since I demoed them against Volkls years ago. The Gotama is my everyday ski now, but when the Mantra first came out, I liked it so much that I sold and gave away my whole quiver. They ski differently. The Mantra is quicker, but the Goat is hardly sluggish. I disagree with Ski mag on that. The Goat is better in powder and more stable in big turns and crud, the Mantra good on ice and hardpack. Both are great skis, but once I got the Gotamas, the Mantras stayed on the rack. Skied the Prophet 100's once, on ice. Scary.
post #24 of 26
 Salomon Tornado Ti's  FTW !
post #25 of 26
Probabbly 1001 skis for you to try. I would add you should try something descended from the Dynastar Legend serries what used to be the 8000, mythic, LP, etc...
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by shirk_007 View Post




Where do you ski? There are not a ton of places that have demo's but I might be able to direct someone that has some.
 

Shirk. Thanks for this offer. I live in nyc so dont have a home mountain per se.  (Butternut does not count right?)

I will week in LCC in January and some southern VT  for a few days xmas. Will also be heading out west in late feb, but due to kiddie concerns, we have not selected a destination yet. Most likely, telluride, sundance or possibly big sky. Shoot me  pm when ever you get a chance. 
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