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DPS Skis?

post #1 of 54
Thread Starter 
Have you skied DPS skis? What do you think of them?

I've become curious about them the past few weeks after getting email from them for a while. I'm quite curious to hear from anyone who has experienced them what they think...

What do you think?

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #2 of 54
Man up and get the 202s
Me on 202s

They look like reverse side cut.  Other than that I know nothing of them. 

If I were to try them I'd probably get a 190 cm 120 Lotus soft in car green.  That is if I frequently skied somewhere that got over 5" of snow a week.  I look forward to skiing vicariously through someone else that does find a use for such a tool.
post #3 of 54
Super light. Super torsionally rigid. I assume the construction improvements the past few years are as advertised. 

I've skied the older design 138s (flex 2) vs Praxis Powders, Pontoons, Kuros... Newer 138s have changed rocker and tip profiles. As stated, they are uber light & uber torsionally rigid. Big fun in any soft snow. Certainly more fun in powder or slush than any conventional ski IMO. I find them fun and rewarding but somewhat more demanding than their competition.  Not as mellow as the others - they seem to have a distinct preference for a more "charging" style compared to the others (at least to my mind). Given my middle of the road quality of skiing - if I am "off" they will throw me on my ass ASAP. If I'm really "on" they are confidence inspiring and smile generating. Based on the old flex 2s, I'd assume a flex 3 is a seriously stiff ski.

I can't speak to their other designs- but I suspect it is to safe assume similar weight and torsional  characteristics - and temperment.

There's a fair bit of discussion at TGR - including significant posts from DPS. marshalolson on TGR was reping them and I think he had a demo fleet at some point. He is a great guy & is in your neck of the woods. Probably a great source of info.

Edited by spindrift - 8/1/2009 at 04:07 am GMT
post #4 of 54
Thread Starter 
Thanks, Spinner... I should have expected you to have skied them! And thanks for the pointer locally. I've been speaking with the western rep about them which is part of what got my interest piqued.

I'm actually looking at the skis for more frontside or mixed, given the typical conditions here in Colorado. But, I admit to being really drawn to the idea of very torsionally stiff skis with a smoother fore/aft flex. I tend to like that a lot.
post #5 of 54
I've had a Lotus 120 for a couple seasons and really like it a lot. Slowest bases ever, however. They are super light, torsionaly rigid with an easy tip-to-tail flex that has a unique 'load up and snap' feel to it. They seem to store and return energy in a way other skis do not, probably the carbon construction. They are lively and 'bright' feeling, not damp at all. I'm a big fan of the Lotus, but what makes me like it makes me think I would not like a more carving oriented ski built like this. The lack of dampness and seriously light weight makes me think it would feel like skiing on a ping pong ball.
post #6 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Slowest bases ever, however.
...
I'm a big fan of the Lotus, but what makes me like it makes me think I would not like a more carving oriented ski built like this. The lack of dampness and seriously light weight makes me think it would feel like skiing on a ping pong ball.

My buddy had the same issue with his bases, they soaked up a lot of wax in the first month. He also had issues with snow freezing to his bases. They worked much better with a finer structure. As for a carbon carving ski I fully agree with you. I skied on a few Goode full carbon models. Really really precise, incredible grip from the torsional stiffness, and super lively. Problem is they terrifying to ski on, especially at speed or in any type of variable snow because they have zero mass.
post #7 of 54
One thing to be aware of is is that they have been changing things up a bit the past few years. Changes include rocker/camber profiles, supposedly shape on at least the 138, - and yes - base material.  I would not project too much about base behavior this year based on older skis...
post #8 of 54

For those looking for good deals on unusual skis..

Philip Drake and the folks at Drake Powderworks  sent me a press release announcing they are offering their entire quiver of models in two different constructions: "Pure" and "Hybrid".  The "Pure" skis are constructed using their more expensive "pre-peg carbon and nanotech" materials they helped pioneer and perfect into their trademark powder boards.  The Hybrid line reduces costs, but  boasts carbon stringers, urethane dampening and high-quality assembly around a bamboo core, all with the same shapes and high-quality emphasis as the "Pure" lineup.

There are some new lengths available, as well as different colors.

Check out the DPS summer preorder page for more details.

From their site:


Quote:

Summer Preorder Info

Through August 15th, Pure: Carbon+Nano skis will be $910, with a special introductory price on Hybrid: Fiberglass+Carbon+Bamboo skis of $575.

Normal Shipping charges apply: $40 to North America, $130 to EU/Global. Skis will ship as soon as they are ready or in stock: that means late-July for some models, with most models completed by mid October.

Deposits will be universally charged at USD. $510, with the your balance difference charged prior to shipment.

We are entering into a new dealer distribution channel this year, so deep discounts will soon become a thing of the past. The MSRP on Pure skis will rise to USD $1179 and an MSRP of Hybrid Skis ranging from USD $680-$740. We will sell out of popular models and sizes.

 


post #9 of 54

The guys at DPS have been busy increasing their lineup with their new:
 

 

  • Hybrid (carbon-fiberglass-bamboo cores) lower-cost, more-damp models (compared to the "Pure" carbon + nano constructions);
  • "S.S." metal-ribs-in-the-core-connecting-prepeg-carbon-laminates technology and;
  • New Wailer 112RP ("Resort Pow") skis....we are hoping to get some test time on their new skis very soon and post some reviews...

112RPlead-box01.jpg
4316149869_5eef763e79.jpg
DPS "S.S." Core Cutaway

The 112RP "Resort Pow" geometry is somewhat unusual (see pic above) and worth examination.

From their website:


Quote:

The thoroughbred Lotus series is now matched with a shape to be skied all day at the resort and in the backcountry. The Wailer 112RP bridges the gap with a shape that combines the loose and early planing feel of a fully rockered ski with aggressive sidecut and slight camber underfoot. It’s a one-ski quiver for planing untracked in the morning, laying trenches down to the lift on the groomed, and slaying crud in the afternoon. A 16m radius underfoot and great torsional stiffness allow for maximum versatility, while the rockered and tapered tips and tail allow the Wailer 112RP to get loose and be driven from the ball of the foot in deeper snow. It's a game changer.

 Wailer 112RP Specifications:

Dimensions: 141/112/128 | R: 16m
Sizes: 168cm, 178cm, and 190cm
Colors: Yellow is standard. Custom colors available for pre-order: green, white, blue, and red.
Construction: There are two construction choices: 1. Pure: Carbon+Nano 2. Hybrid: Fiberglass+Carbon+Bamboo
Pricing: Pure: Carbon+Nano: $1,399 Hybrid: Fiberglass+Carbon+Bamboo: $949

 

Ladies Wailer 112RP Specifications:

Dimensions: 141/112/128 | R: 16m
Sizes: 168cm and 178cm
Colors: Baby Blue is standard. Custom colors available for pre-order: green, white, blue, and red.
Construction: There are two construction choices: 1. Pure: Carbon+Nano 2. Hybrid: Fiberglass+Carbon+Bamboo
Pricing: Pure: Carbon+Nano: $1,399 Hybrid: Fiberglass+Carbon+Bamboo: $949


Quote:

We are jazzed on the Wailer 112RP. It’s a groundbreaker.

Surf in the morning and load up g’s on the way to the lift. You don’t have to go in for a new ski once it’s cut up in the afternoon. The 16m radius underfoot is aggressive. The rocker profile is aggressive. The tip splay is aggressive. 2-3mm of camber underfoot. The flex is fairly firm, but friendly in the tip and tail—a completely new profile was designed for this ski. Yellow is the standard color: in the pre-order custom color options are available. Contact mike@dpsskis.com.

The Wailer 112RP is the center point of your quiver.

The sidecut is great on that shape. It’s fun at the resort—not the typical mandatory slide-fest that wider and straighter shapes are. You can hook this ski up and ride the sidecut and actually pull g’s and round clean carves on the groomed—and at 112 underfoot there is no boot-out.

While dynamic and high-performance while on edge, the Wailer 112RP is also incredibly friendly when off edge, and the sidecut isn’t a hindrance. With the rocker design providing a loose tail, it is incredibly balanced and slides beautifully- massive power slides are easy and very controlled- going sideways at 30 mph isn’t a battle of fore/aft balance, rather a stable ride on the ball of your foot… It’s the best of both worlds in that sense.

But the groomer performance is ridiculously good. With the torsional stiffness of the carbon construction, you can ride the edge in fully g-loaded, railed carves. With the rockered tip and tail you can also let go of the edge and launch into controlled high-speed powerslides- so fun. They are speed and confidence inspiring. At 112, there is no boot out either at high edge angles- super nice.

The versatility and fun factor continues in soft snow—very surfable and planable for 112 underfoot. The rocker and tip lets you drive from the ball of the foot.

You do give up a bit of straight line stability in the deep compared to the bigger/straighter Lotuses, but you get that back in fun and playfulness… it initiates instantaneously.

This ski is going to have a ton of people stoked as the centerpiece of their quiver.

When we check a photo or video of a ski working in soft snow, we are looking for surfing tips and a reeling line of spray coming off the downhill ski- that means the ski is planing effectively- and the Wailer 112RP does that, and more.


If anyone has ridden these new DPS boards...post some reviews!


 

post #10 of 54
I have not skiied on the current or last season's models (would psyched to ski RP 112s), but I do own Lotus 120s from the year before (black topsheet; less splay in the tip rocker).  I love them.  They have made be a much better "3D" snow skier and they are good on packed snow either unless it's frozen pretty hard.  I used to lack confidence in 3D snow, but now it is just fun.  Here are some pictures of them in action in both "3D" higher density powder (about ~10% density - not Sierra cement, but not champagne pow either) and groomed "2D" frozen granular:


1.jpg2.jpg3.jpg5.jpg6.jpg7.jpg8.jpg9.jpg10.jpg11.jpg12.jpg13.jpg14.jpg15.jpg16.jpg17.jpg18.jpg19.jpg20.jpg21.jpg
post #11 of 54
Have logged one day on Lotus 120's 178's, Whiteroom's description is pretty solid. I think 120's would be superb for AT hiking and sidecountry tasks, probably work really well with skins, too. Not so sure I'd choose them for primarily resort use. Construction becomes pretty lively, long radius more work, as the surface gets harder. Lots of reviews over at TGR, including more info on the new 112RP (which is a stiffer lighter S7).
post #12 of 54

I just got a day on the DPS RP-112 Hybrids (not the "Pure" model) in 178cm and new 184cm lengths at Stowe after the 24"+ storm.  All I can say is the other ski builders should be paying serious attention to the RP112, because that ski just wowed me in everything from powder, cut up powder, snowy bumps, hardpack, groomers..you name it.  It is truly a game-changer, and I don't use that term very often, if ever. Stay tuned for a full review in a day or two.

post #13 of 54

cool, a 184 sounds like $ for steamboat.......... I have heard nothing but raves about that 112....

post #14 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExoticSkis View Post

I just got a day on the DPS RP-112 Hybrids (not the "Pure" model) in 178cm and new 184cm lengths at Stowe after the 24"+ storm.  All I can say is the other ski builders should be paying serious attention to the RP112, because that ski just wowed me in everything from powder, cut up powder, snowy bumps, hardpack, groomers..you name it.  It is truly a game-changer, and I don't use that term very often, if ever. Stay tuned for a full review in a day or two.


I should have said hello, I was getting off the quad and you asked the guy I was with (he was on the 190 RP112 Pure) if he was 'Mike'. As we skied past I saw the White Dot skis and it sort of clicked who you most likely were. Glad you had a good day out with Mr Cannon.

 

post #15 of 54

I'm really happy to hear they are adding a 184 to the line-up for next year.  It seems like many skis out there go from the upper 170's straight to 190. 

post #16 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post




I should have said hello, I was getting off the quad and you asked the guy I was with (he was on the 190 RP112 Pure) if he was 'Mike'. As we skied past I saw the White Dot skis and it sort of clicked who you most likely were. Glad you had a good day out with Mr Cannon.

 


Howdy Whiteroom....
It was a great day!  White Dot Director review getting posted in a day or so...along with the RP112 and Wailer 105 review.  I stopped in at SkierShop on the way home...excellent lineup of skis in stock (Icelantic, Kastle, Surface, Boone, Libery, Stockli...etc.)!  Hope to meet you face to face soon!
How did the guy on the Pure RP112 like them? I only skied the hybrid constructions in 178 and 184cm.
 

 

post #17 of 54

Exotic Skis...

Have you ever tried the Boone skis...

Stumbled across them on the internet...

looked like some nice stuff...

post #18 of 54

My current quiver includes a 190cm Wailer 112 RP Hybrid with STH 12's and a 192 Lotus 138 Hybrid Rocker 3.2 with Griffons.  Next season I plan on getting a 190cm Wailer 112 RP Pure and setting it up with Dynafits and if the budget permits I am going to try to pull the trigger on pair of Lotus 138 Pures with Dynafits.  Everything else in the quiver has been sold except for my Salomon Enduro's, which are currently for sale.   I also have a pair of Charters with Dynafits that I am going to hang on to till the end of the season then sell.

 

The Wailer 112 RP lives up to the hype of being a quiver of one, a quiver killer, and a game changer.  As Exotic Skis stated they do everything exceptionally well - powder, crud, wind effected, ice, carving, slarving, turn initiation, variety of turn shapes, trees, hauling ass, billy goating, etc., etc.  The balance of flex, torsional stiffness, dampness, responsiveness, and sidecut is dialed.  I have demoed other skis that are conceptually similar to the 112's but found most of them to come up short on stability, variety of turn shapes, and harder snow conditions and close but not quite as good in every other way.  For me personally, I think the 112 is the most well rounded complete package rockered ski available - period!

 

The Lotus 138's are the single best powder/soft snow ski I have ever owned or demoed.  Anytime its 6"+ of new snow this is probably what I am skiing on.  Zero tip dive, any turn shape, any speed, any terrain, any powder or soft snow condition - no contest!  They are a little challenging on groomers and icy conditions but way more manageable than I expected, was told about, and read about.  However, if they are on my feet its a pow day and groomers and icy conditions are few and far between.  The pro's far out way any con's.  If you ever get the chance to demo them DO IT!

 

 

 

 

post #19 of 54

Hey Exotic...

Did you ever put up your review of the DPS RP112...

Was looking forward to reading that...

 

post #20 of 54

 

Title:  Review: 2011 DPS 112 Hybrid

 

Product:

 

Length/size Tested: 190

 

Environment of Conditions:

*Location of review: Northstar

*Runs Taken: 8

*Snow Conditions: 12-20" heavy windblown 30% water content sierra cement

*Demo or Purchase: demo

 

Summary (inc. Strengths & Weaknesses):

 Strengths: Even being a 190, this ski was amazingly nimble even in the trees. I recently spent a couple of days on a BentChelter in similar but slighty lighter conditions and I must say the 190 DPS out performed the Chetler in every aspect. While groomers and crud are not this skis preferred conditions the 112 did much better than expected. 

 

Weaknesses: While the ski skied very well, I am not sure the quality/ fit & finish is up to being a $899 (or $1199 in the Nano) but skiing it sure makes me feel that DPS is on the right track with this design. I do hear the 2012 production has improved. 

 

Mount Position: I had these mounted at +1 which I didn't realize until I was out skiing, even at that forward mount point I felt the ski had no desire to submarine nor did I ever feel that I was close to going over the handlebars. This position also gave me a bit more tail and not once did I feel like I was wheelying. 

 

Other skis in class: Rossi S7, Atomic BentChetler

 

 

Tester Info:

Age: 47

Height/Weight:

Average days on snow: 0-10, 11-25, 30+  (pick one)

Years Skiing: 0-5, 6-15, 15-30, 30+  (pick one)

 

Aggressiveness: Conservative / Moderate / Aggressive / Competitor (pick one)

 

 

post #21 of 54

Thanks for the review.  I've been wondering about these for awhile now, especially after hearing about their quickness, and their nimbleness in the trees.  But did you get a chance to ski them hard and fast in wider open terrain?  I only ask because others on the list have sometimes said that these 5 point designs while great in untracked and very nimble, sometimes get downright scary at speed.  But a couple of others have said the Wailer is much more stable at speed then one would expect.  Also, I notice they come in both a 176 and a 190.  What length would you recommend for a light weight skier? 

 

Thanks again.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

 

Title:  Review: 2011 DPS 112 Hybrid

 

Product:

 

Length/size Tested: 190

 

Environment of Conditions:

*Location of review: Northstar

*Runs Taken: 8

*Snow Conditions: 12-20" heavy windblown 30% water content sierra cement

*Demo or Purchase: demo

 

Summary (inc. Strengths & Weaknesses):

 Strengths: Even being a 190, this ski was amazingly nimble even in the trees. I recently spent a couple of days on a BentChelter in similar but slighty lighter conditions and I must say the 190 DPS out performed the Chetler in every aspect. While groomers and crud are not this skis preferred conditions the 112 did much better than expected. 

 

Weaknesses: While the ski skied very well, I am not sure the quality/ fit & finish is up to being a $899 (or $1199 in the Nano) but skiing it sure makes me feel that DPS is on the right track with this design. I do hear the 2012 production has improved. 

 

Mount Position: I had these mounted at +1 which I didn't realize until I was out skiing, even at that forward mount point I felt the ski had no desire to submarine nor did I ever feel that I was close to going over the handlebars. This position also gave me a bit more tail and not once did I feel like I was wheelying. 

 

Other skis in class: Rossi S7, Atomic BentChetler

 

 

Tester Info:

Age: 47

Height/Weight:

Average days on snow: 0-10, 11-25, 30+  (pick one)

Years Skiing: 0-5, 6-15, 15-30, 30+  (pick one)

 

Aggressiveness: Conservative / Moderate / Aggressive / Competitor (pick one)

 

 



 

post #22 of 54

I hope to have my review up later this week (traveling now), but the short of it is the 112RP is a legitimate candidate for the ultimate one-ski quiver unless you live to ski boilerplate all day. The 112 RP ( I rode the 178cm and new 184cm hybrid, not "pure" models) has a degree of fun-factor way up there on nearly all surface conditions and snow depths.  It really is as impressive as everyone reports.  I can't think of a ski with such a high level of performance on such a wide range of conditions. Can't wait to try the "pure" versions.  Phil is right when he says the 112RP is nimble in the trees. My demos were mounted on the line "0". I gotta say the 178cm version I rode was probably the best Eastern "tree noodler" I have tried yet. Light, responsive, playful, accurate and secure underfoot.  I had no problems arcing the 178 or 184cm hybrids at GS-speeds on groomers...Secure, grippy and not a hint of squirely behavior evident in some other "5 point" fun shapes.  Wicked fun.  They have an excellent demo program for non-believers...check out their website.

post #23 of 54

What exactly is the attraction of a one ski quiver? th_dunno-1[1].gif  nonono2.gif

Kinda makes me think of a "No Season" tire.....compromises at both ends

Quote:
Originally Posted by ExoticSkis View Post

I hope to have my review up later this week (traveling now), but the short of it is the 112RP is a legitimate candidate for the ultimate one-ski quiver unless you live to ski boilerplate all day.

 


Edited by Rossi Smash - 3/19/11 at 7:49am
post #24 of 54


Looks like I might have to go over to the dark side and try one of these.  Thank you for the reply.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ExoticSkis View Post

I hope to have my review up later this week (traveling now), but the short of it is the 112RP is a legitimate candidate for the ultimate one-ski quiver unless you live to ski boilerplate all day. The 112 RP ( I rode the 178cm and new 184cm hybrid, not "pure" models) has a degree of fun-factor way up there on nearly all surface conditions and snow depths.  It really is as impressive as everyone reports.  I can't think of a ski with such a high level of performance on such a wide range of conditions. Can't wait to try the "pure" versions.  Phil is right when he says the 112RP is nimble in the trees. My demos were mounted on the line "0". I gotta say the 178cm version I rode was probably the best Eastern "tree noodler" I have tried yet. Light, responsive, playful, accurate and secure underfoot.  I had no problems arcing the 178 or 184cm hybrids at GS-speeds on groomers...Secure, grippy and not a hint of squirely behavior evident in some other "5 point" fun shapes.  Wicked fun.  They have an excellent demo program for non-believers...check out their website.



 

post #25 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

What exactly is the attraction of a one ski quiver? th_dunno-1%5B1%5D.gif  nonono2.gif

Kinda makes me think of a "No Season" tire.....compromises at both ends



I used to think the "all mountain ski" was like the "all season tire"...a mediocre performance in multiple situations....somewhat capable, never inspiring, but "did the job" acceptably in many conditions, sometimes sucking big-time in extreme conditions, never excelled or thrilled a person in any particular set of conditions....completely unremarkable in nearly every way, always coming up short of what you really wanted at any one time, and definitely not the right tool to improve your skis or happy-factor.  Nearly every "all mountain ski" or so-called "one ski quiver" seemed to be the same....disappointing in nearly every situation, but never enough to toss your skis and walk down.  I personally love a quiver of different skis...but some people think I'm obsessed.  I think the "one-ski-quiver" is what the bulk of the skiing public lives with, especially when I look at people getting back into the sport after [n] years.  They don't want to buy or manage several pairs...they buy one pair of skis and get back into it.  When I see most recreational skiers in the parking lots, I see they have one pair on the rack or in their pods.  Our best friend and neighbor just got back into skiing after more than a decade+ not skiing, and he saved up to buy one pair of skis to use on snowy days, groomed, packed days, cruddy days, every day.  I think that market is ripe for the one-ski quiver.  I bet most of the folks here at Epic have a couple pairs (old or new) they keep in service...but then again, they are enthusiasts.  I tell people if they are going to live with one ski, buy one that makes them happiest on the conditions they like to ski in (carpet-groomers, powder, bumps..etc.), and be prepared to struggle or have fewer yippie! moments on surfaces outside the optimal performance envelope of their "speciality" skis...or be content to have an "all-mountain" ski that "works OK", but not "great" in multiple situations (a-la "all season tire"),  Before the last two or three seasons, the "one-ski, all-mountain quiver" was really a myth (in my tiny brain).  Based on some skis people have been making lately, the performance envelope of the new skis is getting really, really wide, but also the level of performance across that envelope is climbing higher and higher....making the elusive "one-ski-quiver" a reality for many skiers, including the picky ones.  I found the 112RP to cause me to rethink the idea of a one-ski quiver to make some skiers really really happy.  I will write in my review that I thought if a skier had a race-carver and a 112RP...that would be it.  Total fun and happiness in nearly any situation other than the racecourse or epic, bottomless days or high-intensity spine surfing in Alaska or wherever (I never get to do that anyway).  The days of mediocre performance in an "all terrain" ski is over since some of these new skis have been invented....or at least the level of expected performance has been raised waaay up!  Other opinions may vary....I'm no guru...I just like skis that make me happy! (and not lugging around 3 or 4 pairs to suit the conditions is a nice change!)...

 

post #26 of 54

I skied these again today in light fluffy powder...I think these big bananas could be my next powder ski. 

post #27 of 54

My 112RPs have held up very well this season.  I have about 15 days on them and they still look practically new.  Surprisingly I was on a lift a few weeks ago with a guy who had the Lotus 120 skis and his only had about 10 days on them and they were really chipped up across the top sheets - not sure what to make of that.

 

The 112RP avoids what I consider a "mistake" on deeply rockered skis.  The mistake is making the tips and tails soft.  IMO it's just not necessary for a ski with significant rocker to have the sections where the rocker lives able to flex easily.  They're already rockered so do I really need bend them more in those areas?  Not really.  So by making the rockered tips and tails firmer, the 112RP avoids a major amount of destabilizing flop when at speed.  I wish DPS would make the tips and tails even stiffer.

 

Happy to hear that others here are having good experiences on the 112RP.  Of course it's all the rage over on TGR.

 

BTW - I've even pounded them through moguls quite a bit and have been really surprised at how well they handle that kind of skiing too!

post #28 of 54

I bought a pair of the Wailer 112RPs in Pure for this season, 190cm.  I am 53, 5'11" 163 lbs, ski all my life, good skier, aggressive for my age, but don't like to leave the ground.  I skied for two weeks over Christmas at Whistler, and any time there is any semblance of loose/soft/powder snow they are great.  Having said that, when it hadn't snowed for a few days and I knew the majority of the snow was going to be firm, I went out on K2 Apache Recons - the 112RPs are ok on firm snow, but not that much FUN.  

 

Two weeks ago I did a heliski trip with CMH in the Gothics.  I brought a pair of DPS Lotus 138s in 190 CM and my 112RPs.  The Lotus 138s are a BLAST in powder - easy to turn, float, quick - and now I know what "slarve" means.  Having said that, after three days I switched to my 112RPs, which are also great in powder, just marginally below the Lotus 138s.  Why switch?  Because heliskiing is not all untracked powder,  later in the week it got crusty towards the pickups at the bottom, and the 138s with full reverse/reverse are difficult to ski in those conditions, I just didn't feel safe on them.  If it were pure "alpine" above treeline skiing, the Lotus 138s are the ski, but the 112RPs are more versatile and still way high on the fun meter.  And it is impossible to sink the tips:

 

DSC_0438.jpg

 

post #29 of 54

Just added a review of the "big bananas", 112 RP to the review forum.  In a few words, funny looks, great ski.  Totally defied my expectations, finally a rockered tip/tail powder ski that you can ski all day in the resort, morning AND afternoon.  I may be thinking what Philpug is thinking about these boards.   


Edited by alexzn - 3/22/11 at 6:19pm
post #30 of 54

I just posted my review and some pics of the 184cm and 178cm 112RP in the Gear Review forum at

 

:http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/102734/2011-2012-dps-wailer-112rp-hybrid-184cm-yvette-112rp-hybrid-178cm



 

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