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What skis should I get for Big Sky?

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
Hey all,
This winter I'm planning on doing a season out at Big Sky and I had a question about skis. I already have a pair of Volkl Dogens (twintip) which are great for park riding and skiing groomers, but they are not up to snuff when the snow gets deep. I'm looking for a pair of skis that will be able to handle the deep stuff and be sturdy enough to huck cliffs. I'm 6' 1", 165 and do not have a very large budget (less than a grand). Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks and THINK SNOW!!!!
post #2 of 31
Get something used which you won't mind destroying, because a winter at Big Sky will shred your bases until they cry.
post #3 of 31
 ^^^  What he said.  There are all these little sharp rocks even on the groomers that work their way to the surface at Big Sky.  Off piste can be even worse.  I can't imagine the impact of an entire season.  Spend the money saved by buying used on some tuning equipment if you don't already have some.
post #4 of 31
yes what they said.   Buy used, and the choices are limited only buy skiing style, feel and budget. Give us some more info on how you like to ski and what you like in a ski
post #5 of 31
Don't forget to pick up a good set of groomer skis.  Big Sky has great groomer runs and there is always a dry spell in January where you'll see little or no soft snow.  You'll have a blast on the wide open, empty groomers at Big Sky.
post #6 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbuzz View Post

yes what they said.   Buy used, and the choices are limited only buy skiing style, feel and budget. Give us some more info on how you like to ski and what you like in a ski
 
Im not a hard charger, balls to the wall at all times type skier, but I do like to open it up once in a while. I want something that will be able to handle most deep snow conditions and be able to handle cliff drops, so a stiff tail is a benefit. All im looking for is a good ski for when the snow gets deeper.
post #7 of 31
There is a tendency to go for overkill when picking a Big Sky ski.  I always chuckle watching skiers on big, fat, stiff skis stuggle through the VW bug size crud moguls that develop there.  While there will be epic days now and then most of your skiing will be on smaller dumps and on snow that is only partially skied out. 

One ski that is very popular with the patrollers there is the Rossi B94.  While you can knock it for being damp and somewhat lifeless on groomers it is very solid in off piste conditions you'll encounter there.  One reason it is probably so popular is its the terrain and the snow that makes the skiing Big Sky exciting so you don't have to worry about having a ski that's exciting, also.  You just need something that works for you.  Sticking with something within your abilities both technically and physically will help keep you out of trouble there.
post #8 of 31
I'm surprised nobody has given any specific recommendations yet.  If I were to pick a single ski for someone I haven't seen ski before for skiing Big Sky I would stay with something with a waist in the 90s.  My first choice would be the Head Mojo 94.  It is a great all-around off-piste ski with enough float for light powder and enough grip for hard steeps.  Other choices would be the Volkl Bridge, Nordica Enforcer and the Dynastar Big Trouble.  All the skis I listed are previous year models so you should be able to get good deals.  I've seen the Bridge, Enforcer and Big Trouble sold on www.tramdock.com with big discounts. 
post #9 of 31
WIskier, I am from the midwest, like you, skiing on small home hills, like you.
When I was at BigSky I had the good fortune of hooking up with Rio who did not steer me wrong on my ski choice out there.
sumthin tells me that he's got some good advice there.
post #10 of 31
If I were to describe in one word a good Big Sky ski it would be versatile. Even with a wider powder ski you want a lot of versatility built in. The snow conditions can be very variable, even on a powder day, with wind redistributed snow, wind scoured snow , skied up chop, long road runouts, and large patches of untouched pow (be carefull seeking these out because of hidden rocks).

Rio's advice was good, but I personally wouldn't rule out skis in the high eighties either. In the atomic line from last year I would look at the regular Crimson or the Snoop Daddy. If you want bigger then there is the sugar daddy or the big daddy.

Like everyone else said, you better be prepared to do lots of base welds. It's a great ski area but the hard scree is hell on skis.
post #11 of 31
 I have only 8 days at Big Sky with conditions ranging from "eastern hardpack" to 2'+ of powder but if I had to think about what I would want in that ski....
  • Torsional stiff for hard pack so it would hold a nice edge.
  • Tongitudinally, I would want a med flex in the fore body to perform on softer snow, but a med stiffer tail to make GS turns
  • Turn radius around 20m because there is a lot of room to let the ski "run"
  • Waist  90-100mm for float, yet carvible
  • Length, just above head height

Now, I have to think what that ski is. 
post #12 of 31
A budget of $1K? That would cover 2 or 3 pairs of skis with bindings at a decent used equipment store. Recycle Sports in Frisco, CO and Second Tracks in Dillon, CO have kept me floating and carving on the cheap for years. I like craigslist, too. I got two pair of powder skis for $100 and $80 (one with one without bindings) this last year on craigslist.

Used is the only a great way to go. Especially as someone mentioned earlier, you are going to shred your bases. Let someone else do that for you (along with the crying in their beer) and get 2 or 3 pair of used skis to cover a wide range of skiing without compromising.

Large quivers are the best. Think big! Buy cheap, buy often, never sell or get rid of anything. Before you know it you'll have skis coming out the wahzoo and will always have the right ski for the conditions. Great for when friends visit, too.

Put a couple pair of skis (or more) in the car when you go out and you can switch during the day!

MR
post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

 I have only 8 days at Big Sky with conditions ranging from "eastern hardpack" to 2'+ of powder but if I had to think about what I would want in that ski....
  • Torsional stiff for hard pack so it would hold a nice edge.
  • Tongitudinally, I would want a med flex in the fore body to perform on softer snow, but a med stiffer tail to make GS turns
  • Turn radius around 20m because there is a lot of room to let the ski "run"
  • Waist  90-100mm for float, yet carvible
  • Length, just above head height

Now, I have to think what that ski is. 
 

Icelantic Pilgrim

Fischer Watea 94

Good place to start?
post #14 of 31
Large quivers are great but they really don't work for Big Sky.  At Big Sky you will hits a dozen different snow conditions in one day (and sometimes in one run if you're coming down from the tram.)  You are better off with a solid all-around ski that will handle everything you'll hit in a typical day.  Adding a ski for big dumps and a good hardsnow/groomer ski for the dry spells is a plus but you'll spend 80+% of your time on the all-mountain ski so getting that ski right is critical.

RicB suggestions are good.  Another upper-80s ski to consider is the Dynastar Mythic Rider.  Its probably the most popular ski in the area.  Its the ski I use at Big Sky in everything but epic dumps and icy conditions. 
post #15 of 31
Rio makes a good point.  I use Dynatar Mythic Riders as my work ski.  These ski are well built and are a pleasure to ski.  With 88mm underfoot, the skis work well even with deep snow. Then again, I really do have the time to swap out skis. 
post #16 of 31




those will do the trick
post #17 of 31
 you guys have got to be kidding me. I've gone to big sky for the past 3 years and yes there are some sharp little dagger rocks sticking out on different parts of the mountain. I've taken many lessons their and many of the guides have the VOLKL MANTRA!!!!!! the 09 model has a 96 mm waist. the 08 and 07 models have somthing like a 94 93 mm waist. These skis can rip anything you can find at the sky. And if their happens to be a big dump one day just rent some fat pow skis for the day at the base. problem solved
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

 I have only 8 days at Big Sky with conditions ranging from "eastern hardpack" to 2'+ of powder but if I had to think about what I would want in that ski....
  • Torsional stiff for hard pack so it would hold a nice edge.
  • Tongitudinally, I would want a med flex in the fore body to perform on softer snow, but a med stiffer tail to make GS turns
  • Turn radius around 20m because there is a lot of room to let the ski "run"
  • Waist  90-100mm for float, yet carvible
  • Length, just above head height

Now, I have to think what that ski is. 
 




Quote:
Originally Posted by powderhound95 View Post

 you guys have got to be kidding me. I've gone to big sky for the past 3 years and yes there are some sharp little dagger rocks sticking out on different parts of the mountain. I've taken many lessons their and many of the guides have the VOLKL MANTRA!!!!!! the 09 model has a 96 mm waist. the 08 and 07 models have somthing like a 94 93 mm waist. These skis can rip anything you can find at the sky. And if their happens to be a big dump one day just rent some fat pow skis for the day at the base. problem solved

Lighten up. If you notice the Mantra falls w/in parameters stated in posts like mine. 
post #19 of 31
Ahh, the beauty of Big Sky, you can find rocks after it's snowed all week and powder when it hasn't snowed in a week. Like Rio said, get something versitile - FLOAT is not usually a big issue at Big Sky. Like VA said, one season and they'll be done so I'd get a 2008/09 model or something lightly used. I know most of you guys go a lot wider but I've always thought a not-too-short Recon or D-8000 was about the perfect fit for BS. In other words I might go one size longer and one model narrower at BS than at some places.
post #20 of 31
Rio is the man....

I would add: older models of Volkl Mantra or Dynastar Legend Pro, and other skis WITH METAL in 90-100mm range...
post #21 of 31
I tend to forget about the Mantras and Legend Pros when recommending skis more because of personal taste than the skis ability.  Both are very solid, versital skis with an emphasis on solid.  They are ideal for someone who plans to mainly ski the upper regions of Big Sky where their stiffer flex will help cut through the sun drenched powder and windpack.  Due to the long weekend lines on the tram and my love of moguls I end up spending much of my time in the glades on Andesite where a softer ski is more suited.
post #22 of 31
Armada ARV: these are all mountain skies with durability of park skies. I have 'm too
post #23 of 31
Thread Starter 
Hey all,
Thanks for the help. I got the position so now I just have to pick out my new boards. I'm torn between the Head Mojo 94's and the Dynastar Big Trouble. I'm leaning toward the Big Trouble because I've heard lots of good things about them.

PS: Rio, if you ever want to ride together this year, pm me and we'll work something out.
post #24 of 31
 Warning:
Spending time with Rio will make you fat!
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

 Warning:
Spending time with Rio will make you fat!

Not if you only spend time skiing with me.

Trekchick - Its peek berry season right now.  Do you want me to save you a piece of raspberry, blackberry or blueberry pie?
post #26 of 31
 Yes Please 

.......Mmmmmmmmm, flashback to pear dessert with fresh whipped cream.....
post #27 of 31

Hey all...came across this old thread and was hoping that some of the locals would care to update their picks?? I guess the manufacturers update/change the names/styles so it has been hard to find the current equivalents to some of the above skis??

 

46yo, 5'10, 200lbs...ski Moonlight and Bridger...been skiing 'well used' Volant Gravity 71's in 175 length that I bought left over in '03 with S700's...believe one of the volants has a slight bit of custom rocker from a nice crash last year so prob time to retire them lol...will say intermediate to advanced and have been skiing on and off since the late 70's...grew up back East so mainly still ski the groomers esp when the kids were young but now that the kids are older, expert, and skiing the whole mountain the old man is not cool enuf to ski with anymore...

 

I want to update my ride so I can keep up with the kiddos and on those solo days learn to ski more of the mountain...i am looking for something that will do it all and is forgoving...used or ex-demo say under 400$ if possible??...also not sure what length or width to target??...been trolling CL and EBAY but so many choices and junk out there my head is spinning...

 

Any help appreciated to narrow the search...Thanks again B

post #28 of 31

Look for any ski made in the last 5 years that is 85mm to 105mm wide underfoot and still has edge material left. Any ski that fits this criteria will be way better than what you have.

post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Look for any ski made in the last 5 years that is 85mm to 105mm wide underfoot and still has edge material left. Any ski that fits this criteria will be way better than what you have.

 any opinion on length?

post #30 of 31

My guess is about the Length you've been using in a mid to high 80s width would be a significant upgrade. Even an old pair of Chubbs would be better at BS than the 71s. they're only 90 in the waist. Wide at the time but only mid-fat today.

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